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World Biochar Fuel Market Research Report 2022 (covering USA, Europe, China, Japan, India …

20 May, 2021
 

By ReportMines.com

World Biochar Fuel Market Research Report 2022 (covering USA, Europe, China, Japan, India, South East Asia And Etc) Story

114

$ 2960

World Biochar Fuel Market Report report is categorised based on following features:

1. Global Market Players

2. Geopolitical regions

3. Consumer Insights

4. Technological advancement

5. Historic and Future Analysis of the Market

$ 2960


Biochar Fertilizer Market at a Rapid Growth Pace Until 2027 With Top Companies to Watch Out in …

20 May, 2021
 

The market research report 2021 on global Biochar Fertilizer Market primarily highlights market standing and forecast, categorizes the world Biochar Fertilizer for market size (value & volume) by makers, type, application, and region. It in addition executes the great study of value, current Biochar Fertilizer for a geographical area, technology, and demand-supply.

The Biochar Fertilizer industry will still be a highly energetic industry. Although sales of Biochar Fertilizer brought a lot of opportunities, the study group recommends the new entrants who just having money but without technical advantage and downstream support, do not enter into the Biochar Fertilizer field hastily.

The worldwide market for Biochar Fertilizer is expected to grow at a CAGR of roughly XX% over the next five years, will reach XX million US$ in 2027, from XX million US$ in 2021.

Request a sample copy at: https://www.worldwidemarketreports.com/sample/627117

This report focuses on the Biochar Fertilizer in the global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East, and Africa. This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type, and application.

China is expected to have high consumption in the next few years. For the demand for high-quality products, the price is expected to increase but on a small scale.

Market Segment by Type covers: Organic Fertilizer , Inorganic Fertilizer , Compound Fertilizer

Market Segment by Applications can be divided into Cereals , Oil Crops , Fruits and Vegetables , Others

Market Segment by Manufacturers, this report covers Biogrow Limited , Anulekh , GreenBack , Global Harvest Organics LLC , Pacific Biochar , American BioChar , Pyrotech Energy , AIRTERRA , MBD Industries

These major players have adopted various organic as well as inorganic growth strategies such as mergers & acquisitions, new product launches, expansions, agreements, joint ventures, partnerships, and others to strengthen their position in this market.

In this study, the years considered to estimate the market size of Biochar Fertilizer are as follows:

History Year: 2015-2020
Base Year: 2020
Estimated Year: 2021
Forecast Year 2021 to 2027

A competitive landscape that identifies the main competitors of the worldwide market and their Biochar Fertilizer market share further highlighted during this analysis report. A deliberate identification of major competitors of the Biochar Fertilizer market further as an innovative analysis of their current developments, core competencies, and investments in every phase are careful within the Biochar Fertilizer analysis report.

The research objectives of the Biochar Fertilizer Market are :

The study will also feature the key companies operating in the industry, their product/business portfolio, market share, financial status, regional share, segment revenue, SWOT analysis, key strategies including mergers & acquisitions, product developments, joint ventures & partnerships, and expansions among others, and their latest news as well. The study will also provide a list of emerging players in the Pharmaceutical Plant Extracts market.

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*If you have any special requirements, please let us know and we will offer you the report as you want.

** The Values marked with XX are confidential data. To know more about CAGR figures fill in your information so that our business development executive can get in touch with you.

About WMR

Worldwide Market Reports is your one-stop repository of detailed and in-depth market research reports compiled by an extensive list of publishers from across the globe. We offer reports across virtually all domains and an exhaustive list of sub-domains under the sun. The in-depth market analysis by some of the most vastly experienced analysts provide our diverse range of clients from across all industries with vital decision making insights to plan and align their market strategies in line with current market trends.


Forests and climate change: 'We can't plant our way out of the climate crisis'

20 May, 2021
 

Some climate activists advocate large-scale tree-planting campaigns in forests around the world to suck up heat-trapping carbon dioxide and help rein in climate change.

But in a Perspectives article scheduled for publication May 21 in the journal Science, a University of Michigan climate scientist and his University of Arizona colleague say the idea of planting trees as a substitute for the direct reduction of greenhouse gas emissions could be a pipe dream.

“We can’t plant our way out of the climate crisis,” said Arizona’s David Breshears, a top expert on tree mortality and forest die-off in the West. His co-author is Jonathan Overpeck, dean of the U-M School for Environment and Sustainability and an expert on paleoclimate and climate-vegetation interactions.

Instead of wasting money by planting lots of trees in a way that is destined to fail, it makes more sense to focus on keeping existing forests healthy so they can continue to act as carbon “sinks,” removing carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and storing it in trees and soils, according to the researchers. At the same time, emissions must be reduced as much as possible, as quickly as possible.

Overpeck and Breshears say they hope the role of the world’s forests—and specifically the urgent need to protect existing forests and keep them intact—is thoroughly debated when the world’s climate action leaders gather at the COP26 climate change conference in Glasgow this November.

“Policymakers need to enable new science, policy and finance mechanisms optimized for the disturbance and vegetation change that is unstoppable, and also to ensure that the trees and forests we wish to plant or preserve for the carbon they sequester survive in the face of climate change and other human threats,” Overpeck and Breshears wrote.

“Failure to meet this challenge will mean that large terrestrial stores of carbon will be lost to the atmosphere, accelerating climate change and the impacts on vegetation that threaten many more of the ecosystem services on which humans depend.”

Keeping forests healthy will require a new approach to forest management, one that Overpeck and Breshears call managing for change. As a first step, policymakers and land managers need to acknowledge that additional large-scale vegetation changes are inevitable.

Climate change has been implicated in record-setting wildfires in the western United States, Australia and elsewhere, as well as extensive tree die-offs that are largely due to hotter, drier climate extremes. Those disturbing trends are expected to accelerate as the climate warms, according to Overpeck and Breshears.

“Even in a world where climate change is soon halted, global temperature rise will likely reach between 1.5 and 2 C above pre-industrial levels, with all the associated extreme heat waves that brings, and thus global vegetation will face up to double the climate change already experienced,” they wrote.

At the same time, deforestation continues to expand globally and is especially damaging in tropical forests, which hold vast amounts of biodiversity and sequestered carbon.

The next step toward a new managing-for-change paradigm is to manage forests proactively for the vegetation changes that can be anticipated—instead of trying to maintain forests as they were in the 20th century, Overpeck and Breshears say.

Managing for change means, for example, more aggressive thinning of forests to reduce the buildup of fuels that stoke massive wildfires. It also means selectively replacing some trees—after a wildfire, for example—that are no longer in optimal climate zones with new species that will thrive now and in coming decades.

Such activities, where needed, will inevitably increase the costs of forest management, according to the researchers. But such costs should be considered a prudent investment, one that helps preserve an underappreciated service that forests provide to humanity for free: carbon storage, also known as carbon sequestration.

Forests are already managed to preserve the natural resources and ecosystem services they provide. In addition to supplying timber, fuelwood, fiber and other products, forests clean the air, filter the water, and help control erosion and flooding. They preserve biodiversity and promote soil formation and nutrient cycling, while offering recreational opportunities such as hiking, camping, fishing and hunting.

Carbon sequestration should rank high on the list of invaluable services that forests provide, and efforts to preserve and enhance this vital function should be funded accordingly, Overpeck and Breshears say.

For example, there’s a big opportunity to improve the ability of forests to store carbon through increased use of biochar, a form of charcoal produced by exposing organic waste matter—such as wood chips, crop residue or manure—to heat in a low-oxygen environment. Large amounts of wood generated during forest thinning projects could be converted to biochar, then added to forest soils to improve their health and increase the amount of carbon that is locked away, Overpeck says.

“Thinning of forests, conversion of the removed wood to biochar and burial of the biochar in forest soils is a way to bring new jobs to forested rural areas while allowing forests to play a bigger role in keeping carbon out of the atmosphere and thus fighting climate change,” he said. “Forest carbon management could be a boon for rural areas in need of new economic engines.”

In the long run, such projects are likely to benefit forests and enhance their ability to store carbon far more than massive tree-planting campaigns conducted without appropriate management strategies, according to Overpeck and Breshears.

“Tree-planting has great appeal to some climate activists because it is easy and not that expensive,” Breshears said. “But it’s like bailing water with a big hole in the bucket: While adding more trees can help slow ongoing warming, we’re simultaneously losing trees because of that ongoing warming.”

In their Perspectives article, Overpeck and Breshears explore the implications of a new study by Ondřej Mottl et al., also scheduled for publication May 21 in Science, titled “Global acceleration in rates of vegetation change over the past 18,000 years.”

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More Than $45 Million Coming to Support Wood Projects

20 May, 2021
 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is providing funding support for a variety of wood projects through USDA Forest Service programs. The goal is to expand the use of wood products, bolster wood energy markets, and safeguard community forests. USDA has awarded more than $15 million in grant funding for a variety of projects. Forest Service awards will also leverage an additional $30 million in matching and partner funds. A total of 60 projects will receive funding support for a variety of different activities.

“To manage wildfire and address climate, we need to manage our forests. Today’s investments underpin USDA’s commitment to address the climate crisis with a market-based approach that begins to move us toward a clean energy economy, led by production of renewable fuel and energy and biobased products grown and manufactured here in the U.S.,” Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said in a press release. “The American Jobs Plan and USDA’s budget request for 2022 make sure the Forest Service can prioritize forest management and restoration.”

Twenty-eight wood projects have been awarded funding through the Wood Innovations Grant program. Some of the projects will help expand markets and species options for mass timber. Some of the projects awarded funding through the Community Wood Grant program include the development of a biochar plant, firewood kiln, and pole peeler to expand a forest products facility. Another 10 projects are also being supported through the Community Forest Program to conserve working forests that benefit communities.

“We are placing emphasis on assisting wood energy facilities in economically challenged areas to retool or add advanced technology to replace systems that are inefficient or fueled by fossil fuels,” said Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen. “The grants will also expand markets for cross-laminated timber in commercial and multi-family housing, which supports the important connection to healthy forests and manufacturing in rural communities.”


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20 May, 2021
 

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Soybean residue based biochar prepared by ball milling assisted alkali activation to activate …

20 May, 2021
 

The advanced oxidation process (AOPs) has caused great concern in recent years. Among them, biochar has been widely studied as a catalyst for advanced oxidation process because of its low price and low environmental risk. In this study, a novel ball milling assisted KOH activation biochar (MKBC) was prepared and applied in peroxydisulfate (PDS) activation to degrade tetracycline hydrochloride (TC-H). In comparison with the oxidation (3.48%) by PDS alone and adsorption (36.19%) by MKBC alone, the removal rate of TC-H was increased to 84.15% in the MKBC/PDS system, indicating that MKBC can successfully activate PDS. Besides, the catalytic activity of the MKBC to activate PDS for the degradation of TC-H is 58.33% higher than that of pristine biochar (PBC). In addition, MKBC has outstanding stability that after three repeated experiments, the removal rate of TC-H by the MKBC/PDS system still remains 77.35%. Meanwhile, the mechanism was investigated that the singlet oxygen (1O2) seized the principal position in the degradation of TC-H in the PDS/MKBC system. This study explored a novel, solvent-free and economic method to propose this extraordinary biochar, which provided a new strategy for the future research of biochar.


Fine Biochar Powder Sales Industry Trends And Forecast. Latest Report Report Includes Covid-19 …

20 May, 2021
 

Up Market Research (UMR) published a new report entitled, “International Fine Biochar Powder Sales market” is an exceptional market study that provides the hottest detailed info and extensive analysis of this market. It offers a comprehensive summary of the market with in depth insights on essential aspects such as the present market situation, possible dimensions, quantity, and dynamics of this market. This study report produces a comprehensive evaluation of the COVID-19 pandemic and its effect on the present market and assesses the potential results of the market throughout the forecast period, 2021 – 2028.

Some of the key players included in the report:

Cool Planet
Biochar Supreme
NextChar
Terra Char
Genesis Industries
Interra Energy
CharGrow
Pacific Biochar
Biochar Now
The Biochar Company (TBC)
ElementC6
Vega Biofuels

This report provides a thorough view concerning the competitive landscape of this Fine Biochar Powder Sales Market and carries a wide description of functionality by a number of the key Global players finishing on the market. It offers a listing of newest upgrades of several business plans including Units, and collaborations embraced from these significant international players. The report Provides a very clear picture seeing R&D investment in key players and Adoption of advanced technologies to expand their customer base and enlarge the Present competitive place. Information concerning the position, reach of expansion, and chances of new Entrants or players on the market.

Get Free Exclusive Sample Report: https://www.upmarketresearch.com/request-sample/27567

The report provides a comprehensive analysis of these market segments and sub-segments using a transparent explanation of that segment is predicted to dominate the market throughout the forecast period.

To aid clients in coming informed decision regarding their enterprise investment strategies and strategies of this market, the report gives a extensive details concerning the operation of regional markets and competitions analysis. The report analyses the newest profiles and development of the significant international players competing on the market to know their rankings and expansion capability.

Segments Insight:

The global Fine Biochar Powder Sales market is divided into :

Wood Source Biochar
Corn Source Biochar
Wheat Source Biochar
Others

The report includes Key insights concerning segments and sub-segments of this market. It covers a comprehensive information concerning the operation and market evaluation of each segment together with the anticipated CAGR including a variety of sub-segments of this market throughout the forecast period. Also, the report provides insight about key driving variables which help expand the segment in addition to significant challenges that may hamper the development of segments during the projected period to comprehend the crystal-clear image of the total expansion extent of this market.

Buy the Complete Report: https://upmarketresearch.com/report/fine-biochar-powder-sales-market-global-industry-analysis

Applications

The global Fine Biochar Powder Sales market is categorized into

Soil Conditioner
Fertilizer
Others

The report lists a wide selection of applications of Fine Biochar Powder Sales and addresses the significant businesses that broadly use the product due to their respective applications. A detailed explanation is given in the report concerning the regions of applications describing where the item is embraced by key businesses to leverage their company portfolio. Additionally, it supplies information about variables that help enlarge market range of a number of the essential applications, their earnings share of every application, and also their segment parameters to comprehend that an entire sense of this segment.

Regional Analysis

The global Fine Biochar Powder Sales market is classified as

Asia Pacific

Europe

North America

Latin America

Middle East & Africa

This study moreover, the report contains a wide evaluation of that sub-regions and states within a region, which can be predicted to control the regional market throughout the forecast period. The report offers vital information regarding socioeconomic and political aspects which could help determine the overall functionality and expansion rate of their various regional markets. A special chapter is booked from the report for its COVID-19 outbreak and its effects on the regional market and further clarifies how this outbreak is projected to affect consumers’ behaviour of this Fine Biochar Powder Sales market in the next several years. The report also focuses on elaborating the functions and impacts of their current regional commerce regulations and federal policies & policies which may either boost or interfere with the regional market growth.

For any enquiry: https://www.upmarketresearch.com/enquiry-before-buying/27567

Some Major TOC Points:

Chapter 1. Report Overview

Chapter 2. Global Growth Trends

Chapter 3. Market Share by Key Players

Chapter 4. Breakdown Data by Type and Application

Chapter 5. Market by End Users/Application

Chapter 6. COVID-19 Outbreak: Fine Biochar Powder Sales Industry Impact

Chapter 7. Opportunity Analysis in Covid-19 Crisis

Chapter 8. Market Driving Force

And Many More…

Reason To Buy:

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UpMarketResearch
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Global Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Research Report 2021

20 May, 2021
 

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Global Wood Vinegar Industry Market Insights into the Competitive Scenario of the Industry by …

20 May, 2021
 

The new release by Fior Markets with the title Wood Vinegar Industry Market by Type (Wood Destructive Distillation, Chemical Synthesis), Application (Agriculture, Food Processing, Healthcare), Region, Global Industry Analysis, Market Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2020 to 2027 is intended to give insights into the current trends and happenings in the industry space. The report gives an assessment of different parts of this industry, including production volume, production rate, and others. The report contains a grouping of the business subject to the regions. This archive contains information about the figures relating to the development rate gauge, and the huge market share held by the business space. The report contains an investigation of the new ventures and happenings that are occurring in the business space. It also offers a comprehensive analysis of the global Wood Vinegar Industry industry, standing on the readers’ perspective, delivering detailed market data, and penetrating insights.

DOWNLOAD FREE SAMPLE REPORT: https://www.fiormarkets.com/report-detail/417840/request-sample 

Research Report Examines:

The major players in the market include: Tagrow, Taiko Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., DaeSeung, VerdiLife LLC, Nettenergy B.V., Applied Gaia, Sigma Aldrich, Agribolics Technology Sdn Bhd, and Byron Biochar.

The report has surveyed leading players functioning in this market. Report analysts have covered the sales, revenue, demand, price change, product type, recent development and plan, industry trends, drivers, challenges, obstacles, and potential risks. In a word, the report provides detailed statistics and analysis on the state of the global Wood Vinegar Industry industry. This report studies outstanding players in the market through a full analysis of the company profile, product portfolio, production and manufacturing capabilities, technology and product development, and revenue estimation.

Drivers And Constraints In The Market:

Numerous internal and external elements exist in the global Wood Vinegar Industry market that influences the industry’s performance to a substantial extent. The report then examines numerous elements such as the impact of rapid technological advancement, the impact of alterations in the demand and supply pattern in the industry. Similarly, external factors that impact the industry have been identified and investigated such as the high intensity of competition. These elements could impact market performance during the forecasted period.

The market is split by type and by application. It also provides accurate calculations and forecasts for sales by type and by application in terms of volume and value. The document also includes the latest types of progress and improvements in the market that are presumably going to influence this business space. The study provides a detailed analysis of changing market trends, current and future technologies used, and various strategies adopted by key players of the global Wood Vinegar Industry market.

Global Wood Vinegar Industry Market Analysis And Forecast, By Type

Global Wood Vinegar Industry Market Analysis And Forecast, By Application

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The major regions covered in the report are: North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, South America, and the Middle East and Africa.

Some Of The Key Questions Answered In This Report:

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20 May, 2021
 

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Green additive to upgrade biochar from spent coffee grounds by torrefaction for pollution mitigation

20 May, 2021
 

COVID-19 Information

Public health information (CDC)

Research information (NIH)

SARS-CoV-2 data (NCBI)

Prevention and treatment information (HHS)

Español

A green approach using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to intensify the fuel properties of spent coffee grounds (SCGs) through torrefaction is developed in this study to minimize environmental pollution. Meanwhile, a neural network (NN) is used to minimize bulk density at different combinations of operating conditions to show the accurate and reliable model of NN (R2 = 0.9994). The biochar produced from SCGs torrefied at temperatures of 200-300 °C, duration of 30-60 min, and H2O2 concentrations of 0-100 wt% is examined. The results reveal that the higher heating value (HHV) of biochar increases with rising temperature, duration, or H2O2 concentration, whereas the bulk density has an opposite trend. The HHV, ignition temperature, and bulk density of biochar from torrefaction at 230 °C for 30 min with a 100 wt% H2O2 solution (230-100%-TSCG) are 27.00 MJ∙kg-1, 292 °C, and 120 kg∙m-3, respectively. This HHV accounts for a 29% improvement compared to that of untorrefied SCG. The contact angle (126°), water activity (0.51 aw), and moisture content (7.69%) of the optimized biochar indicate that it has higher resistance against biodegradation, and thereby can be stored longer. Overall, H2O2 is a green treatment additive for SCGs solid fuel. This study has successfully produced biochar with greater HHV and low bulk density at low temperatures. The green additive development can effectively reduce environmental pollutants and upgrade wastes into resources, and achieve “3E”, namely, environmental (non-polluting green additives), energy (biofuel), and circular economy (waste upgrade). In addition, the produced biochar has great potential in the fields of bioadsorbents and soil amendments.

Keywords: Biochar; Environmental pollutants; Neural network; Spent coffee grounds; Torrefaction; Waste reuse.

Declaration of competing interest The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

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Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Research Report Covers Future Trends, Historical – Current Data …

20 May, 2021
 

Market Overview

The report captures the basic information pertaining to the Aluminum Alloy Wheels market along with the critical analysis of the core market factors. The overview highlights the definition of the industry offerings and their application in varying end-user industries. A thorough analysis of the manufacturing and management technology has been presented as well. The integrated report on the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market has been presented after conducting an exhaustive study on the core market elements such as key industry trends, competitive assessment, and thorough regional analysis for the forecasted period of 2021 to 2027.

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Key drivers and constraints

The Aluminum Alloy Wheels market has a deep connection with its market players as their performance directly influences the growth of the industry. The report assesses the volume trends, value and pricing history of the market. The objective is to accurately forecast the growth potential of the dynamic market during the forecasted period. A number of underlying factors have also been identified and evaluated in the report such as growth factors, market restraints, and opportunities. These elements have been studied as they could influence the market performance in the near future.

Regional classification

The report on the Aluminum Alloy Wheels market throws light on the market not only at the global level but also at the regional level. A detailed assessment of the regions has been carried out in the report where the Aluminum Alloy Wheels market is concentrated. Some of the major areas that the report mainly focuses on are North America, Europe, the Middle East and Africa, the Asia Pacific, and Latin America. The performance of the market in these regions has been thoroughly assessed with respect to the prevailing trends, opportunities, and threats that arise in these regional segments.

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Market Analysis By Type: Wood Source Biochar, Corn Stove Source Biochar, Rice Stove Source Biochar, Wheat Stove Source Biochar, Other Stove Source Biochar

Market Analysis By Applications: Soil Conditioner, Fertilizer, Others

Research methodology

In order to carry out a holistic and comprehensive assessment of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market during the forecasted period, numerous parameters have been examined. Porter’s Five Force model has been employed to assess the competitive intensity in the dynamic market. The framework fundamentally sheds light on the competition that arises in the market due to the bargaining power of buyers, bargaining power of suppliers, industry rivals, substitutes, and new market entrants. In addition to this, SWOT analysis has also been used in the report to get a detailed insight into the Aluminum Alloy Wheels market. The tool has shed light on the core strengths and weaknesses of the market players and the opportunities and threats that arise in their path while operating the market.

Major market participants

The competitive landscape of the Aluminum Alloy Wheels market has been thoroughly analyzed which could impact its performance during the forecasted period. The key players that operate in the dynamic market have been evaluated as their performance could mold the industry growth and performance. The strategies of the major market participants have been thoroughly assessed in the report.

Key players in the Global Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market are: Diacarbon Energy, Agri-Tech Producers, Biochar Now, Carbon Gold, Kina, The Biochar Company, Swiss Biochar GmbH, ElementC6, BioChar Products, BlackCarbon, Cool Planet, Carbon Terra, Pacific Biochar, Vega Biofuels, Liaoning Jinhefu Group, Hubei Jinri Ecology-Energy, Nanjing Qinfeng Crop-straw Technology, Seek Bio-Technology (Shanghai)

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Global Biochar Market – Industry Analysis and Forecast (2019-2026) – By Feedstock, By …

20 May, 2021
 

Maximize Market Research has published the “Global Biochar Market Report 2021”, which has covered the comprehensive analysis of market by different segment as well as demand & supply study and gaps between the same by region. The report gives an exclusive insights in key players by region with competitive landscape of the market. The market share in the industry is given by key players, which helps user of the report to understand the market structure at glance.

Global Biochar Market is segmented to reach US$ XX Mn by 2026 in terms of revenue with CAGR of XX% in the forecasting period 2019-2026.

The report has covered the market dynamics including demand drivers, restraints and opportunities by region. External factors and internal factors of companies affecting the growth of the companies and ultimately adding the total market are analysed in the report.

Request For View Sample Biochar Market Report Page :https://www.maximizemarketresearch.com/request-sample/11779

Global Biochar Market Key Competitors: The major players covered in the Biochar market report are

Global Biochar Market, By Feedstock

• Agriculture Waste
• Forestry Waste
• Animal Manure
• Biomass Plantation

Global Biochar Market, By Technology

• Pyrolysis
• Gasification
• Others

Global Biochar Market, By Application

• Gardening
• Agriculture
• Household

Global Biochar Market, By Geography

• North America
• Europe
• Asia-Pacific
• Middle East & Africa
• Latin America

Key Players operating in the Global Biochar Market:

• ECOSUS
• Cool Planet
• Biochar Supreme
• NextChar
• Terra Char
• Genesis Industries
• Interra Energy
• CharGrow
• Pacific Biochar
• Biochar Now
• The Biochar Company (TBC)
• ElementC6
• Vega Biofuels
• Carbon Gold
• Kina
• Swiss Biochar GmbH
• BlackCarbon
• Carbon Terra
• Sonnenerde
• Biokol
• Verora GmbH
• Biochar Products Inc.
• Diacarbon Energy Inc.
• Agri-Tech Producers LLC
• Green Charcoal International
• Vega Biofuels Inc.
• Full Circle Biochar
• Pacific Pyrolysis Pty Ltd.

Do Inquiry Before Purchasing Market Biochar Report Here : https://www.maximizemarketresearch.com/inquiry-before-buying/11779

Biochar Market report studies the top producers and consumers, focuses on product capacity, value, consumption, market share and growth opportunity in these key regions, covering

North America (United States, Canada and Mexico)
Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy)
Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia)
South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia etc.)
Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

About Maximize Market Research:

Maximize Market Research has served esteemed clients including Yamaha, Boeing, Sensata, Etnyre, Canada, ALCOR M&A, Microsoft, Harman, and other 200 MNCs worldwide. The Company provides B2B and B2C market research on 5000 high growth emerging technologies & opportunities in Transportation, Chemical, Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, Electronics & Communications, Internet of Things, Food and Beverages, Aerospace and Defence and other manufacturing sectors. We, at Maximize Market Research, are a strong unified team of industry specialists and analysts across sectors to ensure entire Industry ecosystem is taken in perspective, factoring all recent development, latest trends and futuristic – the technological impact of uniquely specific industries. In line with the agreed scope and objective of the study, our approach is uniquely custom detailed.

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Prince Albert students take part in Applied Research Student Showcase for Sask Polytech

21 May, 2021
 

Saskatchewan Polytechnic’s Applied Research Student Showcase featured 56 project videos focused on solving real-world problems. Some participants in the showcase were from the Prince Albert campus who are taking Geographic Information Science (GIS) certificates and Integrated Resource Management diplomas.

“It’s really to celebrate and show our students outside research projects. Oftentimes these are extra in addition to their programming and they collaborate with industry partners, community partners on projects and they provide a value to our partners in that. And as far as the students they experience that get, they get that hands on experience, they get to work with that industry partner but a lot of times this differentiates our students when they go for interviews when they get into the job market they see that they have done this extra research project,” Dr. Susan Blum, associate vice-president, Applied Research and Innovation for Sask Polytech explained.

“They deliver real world solutions to help all of us in our community,” she added.

The virtual showcase is a celebration of the applied research projects of Sask Polytech’s innovative and passionate students. Videos of the student projects were shared online for adjudication by judges, industry and community partner.

Some of the students participating have previously received a $1,000 scholarship to assist with their research. Other students presented capstone projects, a final assignment part of their academic program.

Students participating from the Prince Albert campus included Dan Richert and Jonah Sutter from GIS and the duo of Lauren Lukan and Tory Frankl from Integrated Resource Management.

“It’s right from nursing, health sciences, engineering, GIS, it’s quite broad and we have had a record number of students participating this year 56. I am really hoping it continues to grow so that we will have over 100 students involved in projects like this for people in our community,” Blum said.

The showcase continues to expand according to Blum.

“It’s been growing ever since it started so this was only I think our fourth year, so we had two in person and now we have had two virtual. So next year we will be in person hopefully.”

Richert’s project was mapping opioid addiction and opioid-related deaths in Saskatchewan. Using models from the United States, Richert created a spatial analysis based on relevant data regarding opioid addiction and opioid-related deaths in Saskatchewan. His analysis shares information that can help to better communicate the problems surrounding the opioid crisis in our province.

Sutter’s project was using GIS to help reduce response times to rural emergencies. For this project Sutter applied spatial analysis to the local fire and rescue services of Springside, Saskatchewan. His analysis shows changes that could be made to improve how jurisdictions are drawn and displays the power GIS could potentially provide to rural planners.

Frankl and Lukan’s project was growing Black Spruce seeds (picea mariana) in three biochar inoculations. Frankl and Lukan compared black spruce seedling growth in biochar/sand mixtures inoculated with compost-derived worm castings, manure, forest soils, peat and non-inoculated controls. Black spruce grown in manure-inoculated biochar displayed significant growth advantages over other soil amendments. These results are likely to contribute to the future success of oil sands reclamation on disturbed forested sites.

In a release from Sask Polytech Blum explained that participating in applied research gives students hands-on experience to transition into their chosen careers.

Some of the students participating have previously received a $1,000 scholarship to assist with their research. Other students presented capstone projects, a final assignment part of their academic program.

“Some students they get a $1,000 scholarship to work on the project. And some of the students have they are called Capstone projects as part of their program they have to do one. So those students can participate in the showcase also,” Blum explained.

The 2021 Applied Research Student Showcase was held virtually for the second year in a row due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Sask Polytech received almost 200 votes in the Industry/People’s Choice category.

The judging took place across all categories with experts in the field.

“We had panels of judges, so we had two panels one for the technology projects and one for our social and health projects. And then we also had an industry people’s choice award so that’s anybody in the public can vote for that one,” Blum said.

“Applied research is where ideas meet reality, delivering practical solutions to everyday challenges,” says Dr. Larry Rosia, president and CEO in a release.

“Applied research assesses a need, proves a concept, and tests new products to refine them for market. Congratulations to all of the students in this year’s virtual showcase on a job well done. You truly are the innovators of tomorrow.”

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Microwave Pyrolysis Market to Show Incredible Growth by 2027 Covid-19 Analysis

21 May, 2021
 

Industry analysis, growth development and current trends depicted in the Microwave Pyrolysis market report are of great help for the new industry players entering into the market. This market report delivers complete overview of the significant factors that will imapct the market growth such as drivers, restraints, and opportunities for the players, challenges, current trends and technological advancements. This Microwave Pyrolysis market report does the thorough assessment of the market and provides insights into market evolution by studying present market scenario and future projection. This research analysis further focuses on industry volume, growth aspects and market share.

Microwave pyrolysis is an important technology to produce Biochar by decomposing organic material at elevated temperature in the absence of oxygen. The heat is generated within the heated material by an electromagnetic irradiation. Microwave pyrolysis is highly efficient and controllable process where all material is treated without any emission to environment.

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Furthermore, the aim of this market report is to provide related valuing between key players, as well as the cost and benefit of the programmed market. It also uses graphics to concentrate on industry standards in order to assist companies in moving forward without difficulty. This market report makes determining the impact of COVID-19 on market growth easy. This Microwave Pyrolysis Market report’s main aim is to include quantitative data in the form of charts and graphs. The knowledge on market fundamentals is presented in a straightforward and understandable manner for the benefit of the readers. Through this well-planned market analysis, all readers, as well as vendors, purchasers, and stakeholders, will gain a detailed understanding of market conditions and industry environment.

Major enterprises in the global market of Microwave Pyrolysis include:
Green Charcoal International
Vega Biofuels
Diacarbon
Genesis Industries
Resynergi

Market Segments by Application:
Processing
Heating and drying food
Medical
Waste management
Sintering
Cooking
Pasteurizing
Synthesis of chemical compound

Type Synopsis:
Tires
Plastics
Timber
Biomass

Table of Content
1 Report Overview
1.1 Product Definition and Scope
1.2 PEST (Political, Economic, Social and Technological) Analysis of Microwave Pyrolysis Market

2 Market Trends and Competitive Landscape
3 Segmentation of Microwave Pyrolysis Market by Types
4 Segmentation of Microwave Pyrolysis Market by End-Users
5 Market Analysis by Major Regions
6 Product Commodity of Microwave Pyrolysis Market in Major Countries
7 North America Microwave Pyrolysis Landscape Analysis
8 Europe Microwave Pyrolysis Landscape Analysis
9 Asia Pacific Microwave Pyrolysis Landscape Analysis
10 Latin America, Middle East & Africa Microwave Pyrolysis Landscape Analysis
11 Major Players Profile

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Microwave Pyrolysis Market data is presented at the regional level for showing growth, sales and revenue according to regions from the year 2021 to 2027. It becomes possible to study about possible shortages along with problems faced by several crucial industries with this report. It flashes light on macro-economic indicators along with parent market trends. It also reveals market competition among chief companies and profiles. Channel features, end-user market data and key players are some of the important market aspects included in this Microwave Pyrolysis market report.

Microwave Pyrolysis Market Intended Audience:
– Microwave Pyrolysis manufacturers
– Microwave Pyrolysis traders, distributors, and suppliers
– Microwave Pyrolysis industry associations
– Product managers, Microwave Pyrolysis industry administrator, C-level executives of the industries
– Market Research and consulting firms

One of the key statistics provided in the report is position of the manufacturers in the market. Knowing the position of manufacturers helps companies as well as individuals to set the business in the global market. In addition, this Microwave Pyrolysis Market analysis explores a few opportunities too. It also helps businesses to attain major remark in the overall market. This in-depth Microwave Pyrolysis Market Report allows you to go through the forecasting of new findings in the market. It also brings you to go through regions covered such as Latin America, Europe, The Middle East and Asia Pacific.

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Synthesis, characteristics and mechanistic insight into the clays and clay minerals-biochar surface …

21 May, 2021
 

Synthesis route of BC-clay/mineral composites from natural sources is shown.

Physicochemical characteristics of various BC-clay/mineral composites are presented.

Removal efficiency of various recent BC-clay/mineral composites is also given.

Adsorption mechanisms for removal of in-/organic contaminants have been discussed.

Synthesis route of BC-clay/mineral composites from natural sources is shown.

Physicochemical characteristics of various BC-clay/mineral composites are presented.

Removal efficiency of various recent BC-clay/mineral composites is also given.

Adsorption mechanisms for removal of in-/organic contaminants have been discussed.

Biochar (BC), a low-cost, porous and carbon-rich material, exhibits excellent potential as an adsorbent in the immobilization and removal of environmental contaminants from water and soil. To enhance the surface area, functionalities and adsorption efficiency of BC, various clay and clay mineral-based physical and chemical modification methods have been adopted. Although extensive studies have been conducted to evaluate the removal efficiencies of BC-clays and clay minerals composites, insight into synthesis, characteristics, and mechanistic understanding between adsorbents and contaminants in environmental remediation has not been fully developed. Therefore, this review focuses on production methods of BC composites with different clays and clay minerals, their surface interactions, physicochemical characteristics, and specifically various adsorption mechanisms involved in the removal process of in-/organic contaminants, and explains how the sorption capacity of the BC-clay/mineral composites is altered. Environmental applications of various BC-clay/mineral composites and factors affecting the surface chemical reactions and interactions of BC-clay/mineral composites are also provided comprehensively. Moreover, this article discusses the increasing interest of BC-clay/mineral composites in enhancing the adsorption efficiency of different contaminants through various mechanisms. The combined effects of BC-clay/mineral composites for the adsorption of in-/organic contaminants both in soil and water are critically reviewed. Future challenges and prospects regarding the use of BC-clay/mineral composites in environmental remediation and achieving commercialization of this promising technology are also considered.


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21 May, 2021
 

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Granular Biochar Market Potential Growth, Size, Share, Demand and Analysis of Key Players …

21 May, 2021
 

The study offers a detailed analysis of the global market for granular biochar. Considering 2019 as the base year, the report provides market information for the 2020 to 2025 forecast period. The study includes information on the current size and projected growth of the overall granular biochar market and its associated business segments. It outlines the dynamics, the business environment, and emerging developments in the granular biochar market.
The study contains a chapter that explains the impact of COVID 19 on the global granular biochar market. The study further discusses the key factors, the business environment, and emerging developments in the granular biochar market. The report will help several vendors to make the right investment and development decisions. The research focuses on the global granular biochar scenario and its proliferation across various market verticals. The descriptions in this report cover factors that currently influence and impede market growth and also accelerate the future dimensions of demand for the granular biochar market. The report covers a fine-grained taxonomy of Market Segmentation.

By Product Type

Wood Source Biochar

Corn Source Biochar

Wheat Source Biochar

Others

By Application

Soil Conditioner

Fertilizer

Others

By Region

North America (The U.S., Canada)

Europe (Germany, France, the U.K., Italy and Rest of Europe)

Asia Pacific (China, India, Japan, Australia, South Korea, Taiwan, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines and Rest of Asia Pacific)

Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, and Rest of Latin America)

Middle East & Africa (GCC, South Africa, and Rest of Middle East & Africa)

The chapters included in the report describe leading players in the granular biochar market. The study provides landscape analysis, which offers detailed profiles of major players in the granular biochar market worldwide.

Market Players

Some of the major players in the granular biochar market are as follows:

Agri-Tech Producers, Biochar Now, Biochar Products, Blackcarbon, Carbon Gold, Carbon Terra, Cool Planet, Diacarbon Energy, Elementc6, Kina

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Some Point from Table of Content:

Chapter 1.Introduction

Chapter 2.Market Overview

2.1.Global Granular Biochar Market Introduction

2.2.Macro- Economic Factor

2.3.Market Determinants

2.3.1.Market Driver

2.3.2.Market Restraints

2.3.3.Market Opportunities

2.3.4.Market Challenges

2.4.Technology/Product Roadmap

2.5.PEST Analysis

2.6.Market Growth Opportunity Analysis

2.7.Impact of Covid-19 on Granular Biochar Market

Chapter 3. Market Segmentation

3.1.Global Granular Biochar Market Analysis (US$ Mn), By Product, 2019 – 2025

3.2.Global Granular Biochar Market Analysis (US$ Mn), By Application, 2019 – 2025

3.3.Global Granular Biochar Market Analysis (US$ Mn), By End User, 2019 – 2025

Chapter 4.Regional Analysis

Chapter 5.Company Profiles 

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Can combined compost and biochar application improve the quality of a highly weathered coastal …

21 May, 2021
 

Soil fertility decline is a major constraint to crop production in sub-Saharan Africa. The positive effect of biochar and compost applications on soil fertility has been reported by many authors. In this study, a 30-day laboratory incubation experiment was done using 120 g samples each of a Haplic acrisol amended with corn cob biochar (cbio), rice husk biochar (rbio), coconut husk biochar (coco300 and coco700) or poultry manure compost (compost); and co- composted rice husk biochar (rcocomp) or co-composted corn cob biochar (cococomp) at rates of 1 % w/w amendment: soil, respectively. Other treatments in the study were combined poultry manure compost and corn cob biochar or rice husk biochar (1 % compost + 1% biochar: 1% soil w/w), respectively, to examine their effects on basal soil respiration, soil pH; soil microbial carbon; cation exchange capacity; total organic carbon, total nitrogen and available nitrogen concentration. Biochar and compost applied solely or together, and composted biochar increased soil pH by 0.28–2.29 pH units compared to the un-amended control. Basal respiration from the sole compost or composted rice husk, or corn cob biochar or combined biochar and compost were higher than the un-amended control, which was similar to that from the biochar only treatments. TOC in the sole compost and combined corn cob biochar and compost treatments were up to 37% and 117% higher, respectively, than the control. Combined application of rice husk biochar and compost increased MBC by 132% while sole compost addition increased MBC by 247%, respectively, compared to the control. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that sole or combined application of compost and biochar, or composted biochar improved soil quality parameters such as soil pH and MBC, and promoted soil C stabilization through enhanced TOC and reduced soil C loss through basal respiration.


Instead of planting trees, keep forests healthy

21 May, 2021
 

By Chrissy Sexton

Earth.com staff writer

Many scientists support the idea that large-scale tree-planting will help to mitigate climate change and global warming. But in a new Perspectives article, two leading experts say the idea of planting trees as a substitute for the direct reduction of greenhouse gas emissions could be a pipe dream.

Jonathan Overpeck is dean of the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability and an expert on paleoclimate and climate-vegetation interactions. His co-author, University of Arizona’s David Breshears, is a top expert on tree mortality and forest die-off in the West. 

According to the researchers, instead of wasting money by planting lots of trees in a way that is destined to fail, it makes more sense to focus on keeping existing forests healthy so they can continue to act as carbon sinks, removing carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and storing it in trees and soils. “We can’t plant our way out of the climate crisis,” said Breshears.

The researchers hope the role of the world’s forests, and specifically the urgent need to protect existing forests and keep them intact, is thoroughly debated at the COP26 climate change conference in Glasgow this November.

“Policymakers need to enable new science, policy and finance mechanisms optimized for the disturbance and vegetation change that is unstoppable, and also to ensure that the trees and forests we wish to plant or preserve for the carbon they sequester survive in the face of climate change and other human threats.”

“Failure to meet this challenge will mean that large terrestrial stores of carbon will be lost to the atmosphere, accelerating climate change and the impacts on vegetation that threaten many more of the ecosystem services on which humans depend.”

Overpeck and Breshears explained that keeping forests healthy will require a new approach to forest management, one that they call managing for change. The first step of this approach is to acknowledge that large-scale vegetation changes are inevitable.

“Even in a world where climate change is soon halted, global temperature rise will likely reach between 1.5 and 2 C above pre-industrial levels, with all the associated extreme heat waves that brings, and thus global vegetation will face up to double the climate change already experienced,” wrote the researchers.

The next step is to manage forests proactively for the vegetation changes that can be anticipated, instead of trying to maintain forests as they were in the 20th century, explained Overpeck and Breshears.

Managing for change means, for example, more aggressive thinning of forests to reduce the buildup of fuels that stoke massive wildfires. Furthermore, the experts point to a big opportunity to improve the ability of forests to store carbon through increased use of biochar, a form of charcoal.

Biochar is produced by exposing organic waste matter, such as wood chips or manure, to heat in a low-oxygen environment. Overpeck noted that large amounts of wood generated during forest thinning projects could be converted to biochar, then added to forest soils to improve their health and increase the amount of carbon that is locked away.

“Thinning of forests, conversion of the removed wood to biochar and burial of the biochar in forest soils is a way to bring new jobs to forested rural areas while allowing forests to play a bigger role in keeping carbon out of the atmosphere and thus fighting climate change,” said Overpeck. “Forest carbon management could be a boon for rural areas in need of new economic engines.”

In the long run, according to the researchers, such projects are likely to benefit forests and enhance their ability to store carbon far more than massive tree-planting campaigns conducted without appropriate management strategies.

“Tree-planting has great appeal to some climate activists because it is easy and not that expensive,” said Breshears. “But it’s like bailing water with a big hole in the bucket: While adding more trees can help slow ongoing warming, we’re simultaneously losing trees because of that ongoing warming.”

The study is published in the journal Science.

By Chrissy Sexton, Earth.com Staff Writer

Find more related articles


Global Biochar Market 2021 Industry Opportunities, Manufacturers, Competitive and Regional …

21 May, 2021
 

MRInsights.biz has launched a new market report titled Global Biochar Market Growth 2021-2026 which is an output of a brief assessment and an all-inclusive analysis of the market’s key factors. The report has learned various factors like market growth, consumption volume, market trends, and business price structures throughout the forecast amount from 2021 to 2026. The report discovers general market scenarios and future market situations along with an analysis of market trends, current and future, drivers, challenges, recent trends, opportunities, advancements, and competitive landscape. The study covers details of market size, growth spectrum, and the competitive scenario of the global Biochar market in the forecast timeline.

Report Introduction:

The report shows market-driven results providing feasibility studies for client requirements. The research covers qualified and verifiable aspects of the global Biochar market. The client requirements are ensured by providing a thorough understanding of market capacities in the real-time scenario. The report examines the profiles of prominent market players, highlighting ratio, capacity, production, revenue, and consumption in terms of geographical areas. The research report has used the numbers and figures in a comprehensive manner with the help of graphical and pictorial representation which represents more clarity on the market.

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Key players profiled in the report include:

Segment by product type, this report focuses on consumption, market share, and growth rate of the market in each product type and can be divided into:

Segment by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share, and growth rate of the market in each application and can be divided into:

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Combustion ash addition promotes the production of K-enriched biochar and K release …

21 May, 2021
 

Pyrolysis of BR/MS blending with ASH benefits K-enriched biochar preparation.

Composite biochar possesses higher content of total K and slow release K.

The accumulative K release amount in 28 days was less than 80% of available K.

K-enriched biochar has the potential to be utilized as slow release fertilizer.

Pyrolysis of BR/MS blending with ASH benefits K-enriched biochar preparation.

Composite biochar possesses higher content of total K and slow release K.

The accumulative K release amount in 28 days was less than 80% of available K.

K-enriched biochar has the potential to be utilized as slow release fertilizer.

Biogas residues (BR) and maize silage (MS) from biogas plants were mixed with biomass combustion ash (ASH) for K-enriched biochar preparation. The characteristics and nutrient contents of biochar were determined by thermo-gravimetric apparatus, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and chemical extraction methods, respectively. The desorption kinetics and slow release mechanism of K in biochar were evaluated after an incubation experiment for 28 days. Results showed that biochar yields were improved from 36.6% to 49.0% for BR-based biochars (BRCs) and 24.9% to 38.2% for MS-based biochars (MSCs) with the addition of ASH during pyrolysis. The total potassium (TK) content of composite biochar increased to the highest TK content of 37.29 mg/g in biochar derived from MS with 20 wt% ash (MSCA20%). Furthermore, slow-available K content increased from 0.86 mg/g and 1.62 mg/g of primary biochar derived from BR and MS to 6.88 mg/g and 7.8 mg/g in composite biochar with 20 wt% ash respectively. The formation of K-Si-Al-O species involved unstable clay minerals and stable insoluble minerals during the catalytic pyrolysis improved slow release performance. The composite biochar showed a slower and continuable K+ release property in the incubation experiment, releasing less than 80% of the total available K into water in 28 days. The K+ desorption kinetics fitted the Power function well, indicating release of K+ was a complex reaction process. This lab-scale work showed that the pyrolytic composite biochar from wastes in biogas plants with combustion ash addition has the potential to be slow release fertilizer. The combined thermal conversion of solid wastes provides a sustainable strategy to simultaneously achieve the reclamation of nutrients and generation of environmental benefits via the production of biochar fertilizer.


Global Biochar Market By Manufacturers, Types, Regions and Application and Forecast to 2026 by …

21 May, 2021
 

The detailed review of Biochar was conducted in the Global Biochar Market 2020 Survey to collect important and substantive data on Biochar market size, growth rate, potential demand, and Biochar sales forecasts from 2021 to 2026. It gives an analysis of the industry chain situation, key market players, market volume, upstream raw material, production cost, and marketing channels, volume, region-wise import/export analysis, and forecast market from 2021-2026.

The Biochar market has been changing everywhere throughout the world and we have been seeing an extraordinary development in the Biochar and this growth is expected to be huge by 2026. The report covers Biochar applications, market elements, and the analysis of rising and existing market segments. It shows the market outline, product classification, application, and market volume forecast from 2021-2026.

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Key Companies Profiled in this research:


Phoenix Energy
Carbon Gold Ltd
Cool Planet Energy Systems Inc.
Diacarbon Energy Inc.
Biochar Supreme, LLC
Vega Biofuels, Inc.
Carbon Terra GmbH
The Biochar Company
Swiss Biochar GmbH
Agri-Tech Producers, LLC
ArSta Eco
PYREG GmbH
Sonnenerde
BlackCarbon A/S
Pacific Pyrolysis
Biochar Products, Inc.

Global Biochar Market Segmentation:

By Application:

Gardening
Agriculture
Household

By Type:

Agriculture Waste
Forestry Waste
Animal Manure
Biomass Plantation

The report includes insightful information about the primary part of the Biochar market. The report has a segmented market according to its type and application. Each part is thoroughly analyzed on the basis of its creation, use as well as earnings. It is classified by geographical area: North America, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.

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Report Objectives

– Analyze the size of the global Biochar market based on value and volume
– Accurate calculation of market shares, consumption, and other important factors in different segments of the global stock market
– Exploring the main driving force of the Global Biochar market
– Highlighting the important trends of the global Biochar market in terms of production, revenue, and sales
– Highly profiling the top players in the Global Biochar market and showing how they compete in the industry.
– Study of production pricing, manufacturing cost, production process, and various trends related to them
– Showing the performance of different provinces and countries in the Global Biochar market
– All key segments and regional market size and shared forecasts 2021-2026

Table of contents:

Global Biochar Market
Lesson 1: Biochar Market Overview, Drivers, Restrictions, and Opportunities
Chapter 2: Biochar Market Competition from Manufacturers
Chapter 3: Biochar Production by Provinces
Chapter 4: Type, Product by Type, Market Share by Type
Chapter 5: Consumption, by applications
Chapter 6: Detailed profiling and manufacturer analysis
Chapter 7: Product Cost Analysis
Chapter 8: Industrial Chain, Sourcing Policy and Downstream Buyers
Chapter 9: Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors / Merchants
Chapter 10: Biochar Market Effects Component Analysis
Chapter 11: Biochar Market Predictions
Chapter 12: Biochar Market Conclusion

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Research on MCGS biochar measurement and control system | ScienceGate

21 May, 2021
 

The ScienceGate team tries to make research easier by managing and providing several unique services gathered in our platform.


We can't “plant our way” out of the climate crisis, researchers argue

21 May, 2021
 

We won’t solve the climate crisis by planting a large number of trees around the world. Instead, countries should focus on keeping the existing forest healthy, so they can continue to act as carbon sinks and remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere through photosynthesis, according to a new commentary piece.

University of Arizona’s researcher David Breshears and his colleague from the University of Michigan Jonathan Overpeck said the world can’t “plant its way out of the climate crisis.” According to the two researchers, the idea of planting trees as a substitute for the direct reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is simply a pipe dream.

“Policymakers need to enable new science, policy and finance mechanisms optimized for the disturbance and vegetation change that is unstoppable, and also to ensure that the trees and forests we wish to plant or preserve for the carbon they sequester survive in the face of climate change and other human threats,” they wrote.

“Tree-planting has great appeal to some climate activists because it is easy and not that expensive,” Breshears said. “But it’s like bailing water with a big hole in the bucket: While adding more trees can help slow ongoing warming, we’re simultaneously losing trees because of that ongoing warming.”

The idea of planting trees as a low-cost and high-impact solution to climate change increasingly pops up time and time again. Previous studies have highlighted the potential of trees to soak up and store carbon, with countries like the US and the UK starting massive tree-planting campaigns as part of their climate plans.

But it’s not that simple. There are many tree-planting initiatives underway across the globe, all of which aim to capture carbon to compensate for the huge carbon dioxide emissions that are a major cause of rising global temperatures. But in some cases, they don’t actually increase carbon capture and instead have negative consequences.

Breshears and Overpeck said policymakers and land managers have to acknowledge that additional vegetation changes are inevitable. Climate change has recently been linked to record-setting wildfires in the United States and Australia, for example. These trends are expected to accelerate as the climate warms, the researchers argued. 

“Even in a world where climate change is soon halted, global temperature rise will likely reach between 1.5 and 2 C above pre-industrial levels, with all the associated extreme heat waves that brings, and thus global vegetation will face up to double the climate change already experienced,” they wrote.

While climate change is accelerating, deforestation continues to expand globally and is especially damaging in tropical forests, which hold vast amounts of biodiversity and sequestered carbon, Breshears and Overpeck said. Last year, at least 42,000 squared kilometers of tree cover were lost in key tropical regions such as the Amazon basin.

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Two-thirds of global forest cover loss is occurring in the tropic and subtropic regions of the world, where vast clusters of deforestation hot spots are destroying the important ecosystem services forests provide. There are 24 of these hot spots that are spread across Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, and Oceania.

The researchers advise countries to manage forests proactively for the vegetation changes that can be anticipated, instead of trying to maintain forests as they were decades ago. This means more aggressive thinning of forests to reduce the buildup of fuels that increase wildfires and replacing trees that aren’t in optimal climate zones. 

While these actions will increase the cost of forest management, Breshears and Overpeck described it as a prudent investment, helping to preserve the service of carbon capture provided by forests. Capturing carbon should rank high on the list of invaluable services that forests provide, and efforts to preserve it should be funded. 

“Thinning of forests, conversion of the removed wood to biochar and burial of the biochar in forest soils is a way to bring new jobs to forested rural areas while allowing forests to play a bigger role in keeping carbon out of the atmosphere and thus fighting climate change. Forest carbon management could be a boon for rural areas in need of new economic engines,” the researchers wrote.

The commentary was published in Science. 

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22 May, 2021
 

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Combined application of poultry litter biochar and NPK fertilizer improves cabbage yield and soil …

22 May, 2021
 

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Low soil fertility is a major problem limiting peri-urban vegetable production in the Kumasi metropolis. This study was conducted to assess the effects of poultry litter biochar (PLB) and NPK fertilizer application on soil chemical properties and the yield of cabbage. Twelve treatments (control, 100% NPK, 50% NPK, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK, 5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK, 7.5 t ha−1 PLB, 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK) were evaluated under field conditions in a randomized block design with three replications. Combined application of PLB and NPK fertilizer improved the soil chemical properties, growth, and yield of cabbage relative to the control and sole PLB treatments. Application of 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK increased the soil pH, soil organic carbon, available phosphorus, and cation exchange capacity by 26.6, 41.4, 296, and 78.7%, respectively, relative to the control. Moreover, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK increased the cabbage yield by 73% compared with the control. This study concludes that PLB and NPK fertilizers can be applied to improve the soil chemical properties and yield of cabbage.

Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.) is an important leafy vegetable widely cultivated by vegetable farmers in Ghana. It belongs to the family Brassicaceae together with turnips, cauliflowers, and brussel sprouts (Franzke et al. 2011). It is widely used in the preparation of local food either cooked or used fresh in making salads. Cabbage plays an important role in human nutrition as it contains essential vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals (Draghici et al. 2013). It serves as a major source of income for vegetable farmers involved in urban and peri-urban agriculture and all the actors in the cabbage value chain, i.e., farmers, middlemen, and market women. Cabbage farming has gained popularity in Ghana due to its lucrative returns from high yields with high profit margins particularly during the off season (December–April). In spite of the nutritional and economic benefits of cabbage, its production is, however, constrained by low soil fertility arising from continuous cropping without replacement of the lost nutrients. Cabbage farming in the Kumasi metropolis is mostly done close to streams where the soils are sandy and poor in nutrients. The global threat of climate change negatively impacts the soil fertility and crop production through erratic rainfall, prolonged periods of drought, and extremely high temperatures. The threat of climate change’s impact on soil fertility and agricultural food production with the potential of reducing crop yields in regions that are more vulnerable to its impacts (Chan and Xu 2009) calls for more integrated and sustainable soil fertility management interventions to enhance crop production.

Biochar application as a soil amendment has attracted a lot of attention over the past two decades due to its agronomic and environmental benefits in the agro-ecosystems (Wu et al. 2019). Biochar is a carbon-rich solid material obtained from the thermochemical conversion of biomass in an oxygen-limited environment, which can be applied for improving the soil fertility, increasing the resource use efficiency, and reducting the greenhouse gas emissions (IBI 2012). Due to its specific properties, biochar is widely applied to soils for agricultural and environmental benefits; hence, it is important to understand its behavior and functions in the soil (Ahmad et al. 2014). Crop growth enhancement following biochar application has been attributed to its inherent structure and physicochemical properties which directly or indirectly affect the soil properties such as bulk density, porosity, and water content, which in turn promotes nutrient accumulation and growth of beneficial soil microbes (Jaafar et al. 2014). The benefits of biochar application for soil fertility improvement and carbon sequestration have been well studied (Amendola et al. 2017; Gul et al. 2015). Biochar incorporation has been found to increase soil pH, organic carbon, water-holding capacity, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and agronomic use efficiency of applied N (Abiven et al. 2015). Biochar also facilitates the cycling of nitrogen and phosphorus, thereby improving the soil fertility (Zheng et al. 2013). Generally, the elemental composition and the activity of biochar are determined by the biomass feedstock from which it is produced (Zhao et al. 2018). Biochar from animal wastes, e.g., poultry litter and biosolids, have higher levels of essential nutrients than that produced from woody or herbaceous sources (Bird et al. 2011).

Most vegetable farmers within the Kumasi metropolis use fresh poultry litter as an amendment to improve soil fertility for higher crop yields. However, the risk of food contamination by pathogens and emission of greenhouse gases remain the key food safety and environmental concerns associated with the application of fresh poultry litter for crop production (Lesschen et al. 2011). Moreover, biochar application has been shown to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural fields (Shen et al. 2017; Fidel et al. 2019) as conversion of waste biomass into biochar offers an effective means of sequestering carbon in the soil due to its recalcitrance to decomposition (Major et al. 2010). Charring of poultry litter also offers a means of optimizing its quality for application as a soil amendment as well as a renewable alternative for its disposal, which is sometimes problematic for poultry farmers.

Integrated use of organic and inorganic fertilizers has been advocated as a more sustainable means of improving soil productivity on highly weathered tropic soils. According to Bashagaluke et al. (2020), integrated application of biochar and mineral fertilizers holds promise for improving the productivity of cropping systems in sub-Saharan Africa, with higher economic returns particularly in intercropping systems. Biochar research work in Ghana mainly focused on the use of biochar produced from low-nutrient content biomass feedstock such as corn cob, rice husk, and rice straw (Yeboah et al. 2016; Calys-Tagoe et al. 2019). The effectiveness of biochar produced from nutrient-rich biomass feedstock such as poultry litter for improving soil fertility and crop yield has, however, not been assessed within the context of integrated soil fertility management.

Given the potential of biochar as an amendment to improve soil fertility and increase the use efficiency of applied N (Slavich et al. 2013), we hypothesized that combined application of poultry litter biochar (PLB) and NPK fertilizer will improve the soil quality, growth, and yield of cabbage. We conducted a field experiment to assess the effectiveness of PLB as an amendment for soil quality improvement and increased cabbage production. The objectives of the study were to (a) determine the effects of combined application of PLB and NPK fertilizer on growth and yield of cabbage, (b) determine the optimum rate of PLB and NPK fertilizer application for cabbage production, and (c) assess the effects of PLB application on soil chemical properties.

The experiment was conducted at the research station of CSIR – Soil Research Institute in Kumasi, Ghana, during the major planting season from April to July 2019. The area lies within the semi-deciduous forest zone of Ghana (Latitude 06°40′29.7″N, Longitude 001°40′08.2″W) at an altitude of 268 m above sea level. The area is characterized by a bimodal rainfall pattern, with the major rainy season starting from March to July and the minor season from September to November. The mean annual precipitation of the area is about 1,500 mm while the mean monthly temperatures range from 24 to 28°C. The study was conducted on a sandy loam soil classified as Ferric Acrisol (FAO 1998).

Ten core soil samples were taken from the entire experimental field at 5 m apart along a Z-plane at a depth of 0–20 cm using auger (Eijkelkamp, the Netherlands). The core samples were thoroughly mixed in a bucket and subsampled to obtain a representative composite sample for the experimental field. The composite sample after air-drying and passing through a 2-mm sieve was subjected to physical and chemical analyses. After harvesting, five core soil samples were taken from each treatment plot for analysis to determine the treatment effects on soil chemical properties. Soil pH was determined using a H1 9017 Microprocessor pH meter in a 1:2.5 suspension of soil and water. The modified Walkley-Black method as described by Nelson and Sommers (1996) was used to determine the soil organic carbon (SOC) while the total soil nitrogen was determined by the Kjeldahl method (Soils Laboratory Staff 1984). The available acid-soluble phosphorus was extracted with Bray 1 solution (HCl:NH4F mixture) as described by Bray and Kurtz (1945) after which the color of the solution was measured photometrically using Spectronic 21 D Spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 660 nm by mixing with coloring agent (ammonium paramolybdate) and a pinch of ascorbic acid. Exchangeable calcium and magnesium were determined in 1.0 M ammonium acetate extract buffered at pH 7 using the titrimetric method. Exchangeable potassium and sodium were determined using 1.0 M ammonium acetate extract buffered at pH 7 using Microprocessor Flame Photometer FP902 PG Instruments and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer Agilent Technologies 240 FS, respectively. Soil texture was determined by the hydrometer method. The initial chemical properties of soils at the experimental site are shown in Table 1. The soil at the study area was characteristic of a highly weathered Ferric Acrisol with nutrient deficiencies that limit crop production. The soil was moderately acidic with low levels of nitrogen, potassium, calcium, magnesium, total exchangeable base, and CEC but had adequate amounts of available phosphorus and organic carbon (Yeboah et al. 2013).

Initial soil physical and chemical properties

The PLB for this study was produced from poultry litter feedstock obtained from a local poultry farm close to the Soil Research Institute. The poultry litter was air-dried to a moisture content of 15% and was pyrolyzed at a temperature of 450°C using a slow pyrolysis batch kiln located at the Soil Research Institute, Kumasi, Ghana. The charring process had a resident time of 48 h resulting in 65% feedstock weight loss and a biochar recovery yield of 35%. After the charring process was completed, the charred poultry litter was sprinkled with water and left to cool for 3 h. It was then milled and stored in sacks till it was needed for field application. Subsamples of the charred poultry litter were taken from all the sacks, homogenized, and ground to <2 mm for chemical analysis. The pH and electrical conductivity of the biochar were determined after shaking it in deionized water for 30 mins in a 1:5 (biochar–deionized water) ratio. Total carbon and nitrogen concentrations were determined by loss on ignition and Kjeldahl methods, respectively, while total phosphorus was determined by the vanadate–molybdate method. Exchangeable cations (Ca, Mg, and K) were determined in 1 M ammonium acetate (pH 7) extract using the titrimetric method. Ash content of the biochar was determined by dry combustion in a muffle furnace at 550°C for 2 h. The PLB used for this study was alkaline in nature, with significant amounts of plant nutrients. Chemical properties of the PLB are indicated in Table 2.

Chemical properties of poultry litter biochar

The field experiment was laid out in randomized block design with 12 treatments, each replicated three times. The field was laid into plots measuring 3.0 × 4.8 m with an alley of 2 m between blocks and 1 m between plots. The treatments imposed consisted of control (no amendment), 100% NPK, 50% NPK, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK, 5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK, 7.5 t ha−1 PLB, 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK. One hundred percent NPK corresponds to the recommended NPK fertilizer for cabbage at 90 kg ha−1 N, 60 kg ha−1 P2O5, and 60 kg ha−1 K2O. The sources of N, P, and K were sulfate of ammonia, 23% N w/w; triple super phosphate, 46% P2O5 w/w; and muriate of potash, 60% K2O w/w, respectively.

The land which was used in the previous season for cropping maize was ploughed and harrowed using a farm tractor. PLB treatments were spot applied on the plots 2 weeks before transplanting of seedlings. Seeds of cabbage variety Oxylus were nursed by sowing in drills at 10 cm apart on solar sterilized seed beds measuring 1.2 × 5 m. The seed beds were covered with palm fronds after sowing to provide shade. The palm fronds were removed after emergence and used to provide shade at 2 m above the seed beds. Weak and malformed seedlings were thinned out to prevent overcrowding, and the seedlings were pricked out at 7 days after emergence. Two weeks prior to transplanting the seedlings out onto the field, the seedlings were fertilized with NPK 15:15:15 liquid feed (5 g NPK L−1 of water) by direct application to the soil. Insect pests were controlled by erecting nets around and over the seedling beds. The seedlings were transplanted at 4 weeks after emergence at a planting distance of 60 cm between rows and 40 cm within rows. Each plot contained nine rows with seven plants per row, giving a total of 63 plants per plot.

The plots were treated with Funguran 48 h before transplanting to prevent attack by fungal and bacterial pathogens, and the seedlings were irrigated immediately after transplanting using a watering can. Basal fertilizer application was done at planting where 60 kg ha−1 N, P2O5, K2O and 30 kg ha−1 N, P2O5, K2O were spot applied on plots receiving 100% NPK and 50% NPK, respectively. The remaining dose of N fertilizer was applied as top dress at 5 weeks after transplanting. Regular shallow hoeing was done as and when necessary to control weed growth. Insect pests of cabbage such as caterpillars, diamondback moth, mole cricket, etc. were controlled by spraying with Bypel (Bacillus thuringiensis) insecticide at a dosage of 20 g 15 L−1 of water fortnightly.

Data on cabbage plant height, stem girth, leaf spread, fresh leaf biomass yield, head circumference, and fresh head yield were collected during crop growth and at harvest. Data on crop growth parameters were taken weekly for a period of 4 weeks. Five plants were randomly selected from each plot and tagged for weekly plant height, stem girth, and leaf spread measurements. Plant height and leaf spread were measured using a measuring tape while stem girth was measured with a digital vernier caliper. At harvest, 10 plants were randomly selected from each plot for the determination of yield indices. Yield indices determined included cabbage head circumference, fresh leaf biomass, and head yield. Partial factor productivity of applied N (PFPN) which is also an indication of agronomic nitrogen use efficiency (kg yield kg−1 N applied) was calculated using the formula:

Data collected on cabbage growth and yield indices were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) using GenStat Statistical Package Version 12.01 (VSN 2008). Comparison of treatment means was done using Duncan multiple range test (DMRT) at 5% level of significance.

Soil chemical properties as affected by the soil amendments at the end of the cropping season are as indicated in Table 3. Soil pH from the control plots was the least (5.25) among the treatments, and this increased significantly (p < 0.05) following the application of all the treatments except 100% NPK which was not different from the control.

Effects of poultry litter biochar and NPK fertilizer on selected soil chemical properties

Control = no amendment; 50% NPK = 45 kg ha−1 N, 30 kg ha−1 P2O5, 30 kg ha−1 K2O; 100% NPK = 90 kg ha−1 N, 60 kg ha−1 P2O5, 60 kg ha−1 K2O. Values followed by the same letters in a column are not significantly different (DMRT) at 5% and vice versa. SOC = soil organic carbon, Av. P = available phosphorus, CEC = cation exchange capacity.

SOC also increased significantly (p < 0.05) following the application of the soil amendments with 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK, giving the highest (14.9 g kg−1) SOC content; but the 50% NPK had the least (5.0 g kg−1). Moreover, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK significantly (p < 0.05) increased the SOC content by 50.5, 28.4, 12.0, and 20.1% as compared to the control, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB treatments, respectively; 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK also increased the SOC content by 198 and 63.7% relative to the 50% NPK and 100% NPK treatments, respectively.

Application of the soil amendments significantly (p < 0.05) increased the available soil phosphorus relative to the control. The available soil phosphorus was least (26.37 ppm) in the control and highest (104.43 ppm) with the application of 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK (Table 3). The increase in the available soil phosphorus over the control following the application of the soil amendments was in the order: 100% NPK < 5 t ha−1 PLB < 50% NPK < 7.5 t ha−1 PLB < 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK < 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK < 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK < 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK < 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK < 2.5 t ha−1 PLB < 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK. Significant increases in CEC compared to the control were recorded for all the amendments imposed except 50% NPK, 100% NPK, and 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK and 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK which resulted in significant decreases in CEC; 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK recorded the highest CEC representing increases of 98.1, 36.0, 10.8, 25.3, and 12.0% compared with the control, 5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK treatments, respectively.

No significant differences were observed between the mean plant height of the control and sole PLB treatments, i.e., 2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB (Figure 1). Combined application of NPK fertilizer and PLB, however, resulted in significant (p < 0.05) increases in plant height relative to the control and sole PLB treatments after 4 weeks; 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK gave the highest (39.12 cm) plant height while 2.5 t ha−1 PLB recorded the least (33.60 cm) plant height which was not significantly different from the control (34.02 cm). Plant height from application of 50% NPK and 100% NPK was not significantly different from the control and the other treatments.

Effect of poultry litter biochar and NPK fertilizer application on plant height of cabbage. Error bars represent ± SED. Treatment bars followed by the same letters are not significantly different (DMRT) at 5% and vice versa.

Stem girth responded positively to PLB and NPK fertilizer application (Figure 2). Application of 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK resulted in the highest (2.37 cm) stem girth representing significant (p < 0.05) increases of 30, 29, 20, and 20% relative to the control, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB treatments, respectively. Stem girth of plants from plots amended with 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK was comparable with that from 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK, 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK, and 100% NPK treatments but was significantly higher than the rest of the treatments including 50% NPK, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB, 7.5 t ha−1 PLB, and the control which gave the least stem girth (1.81 cm). Plots amended with sole PLB, i.e., 2.5 t ha−1 PLB and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB had stem girths that were not significantly different from that of the control. Plots treated with sole 50% NPK and 100% NPK gave stem girths that were comparable with each other when applied solely or in combination with PLB.

Effect of poultry litter biochar and NPK fertilizer application on stem girth of cabbage. Error bars represent ± SED. Treatment bars followed by the same letters are not significantly different (DMRT) at 5% level of significance and vice versa.

The effects of PLB and NPK fertilizer application on cabbage leaf spread are shown in Figure 3. A similar trend was observed in leaf spread with the application of the treatments, where the control treatment recorded significantly (p < 0.05) lower (56.51 cm) leaf spread than all other treatments except the sole PLB treatments, which were comparable with that from the control. Application of 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK gave the highest (68.97 cm) leaf spread representing increases of 22.0, 20.3, 13.6, and 14.3% compared with the control, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB treatments, respectively.

Effect of poultry litter biochar and NPK fertilizer application on leaf spread of cabbage. Error bars represent ± SED. Treatment bars followed by the same letters are not significantly different (DMRT) at 5% and vice versa.

Combined application of either 50% or 100% NPK fertilizer with the PLB treatments significantly increased the cabbage leaf spread compared to their respective sole biochar treatments (i.e., 2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB).

Cabbage head circumference, leaf biomass, and fresh head yields responded positively to the soil amendments with the control treatment recording the least head circumference, leaf biomass, and fresh head yields (Table 4).

Effects of poultry litter biochar and NPK fertilizer on cabbage head circumference, leaf biomass, and head yield

Control = no amendment; 50% NPK = 45 kg ha−1 N, 30 kg ha−1 P2O5, 30 kg ha−1 K2O; 100% NPK = 90 kg ha−1 N, 60 kg ha−1 P2O5, 60 kg ha−1 K2O. Values followed by the same letters in a column are not significantly different (DMRT) at 5% and vice versa.

Application of 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK resulted in the highest (63.22 cm) cabbage head circumference, which represented significant (p < 0.05) increases of 31.8, 30.1, 17.1, and 30.0% compared to the control, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB treatments, respectively. Sole application of 100% NPK and 50% NPK resulted in cabbage head circumference that was not significantly different from all the biochar amended NPK fertilizer treatments except 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, which recorded significantly higher head circumference (63.22 cm) than the 50% NPK treatment.

Soil amendments resulted in significant (p < 0.05) increases in fresh leaf biomass yield compared with the control except the sole biochar treatments (2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB), which were comparable with the control (Table 4). Application of 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK and 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK increased the leaf biomass yield by 107.7 and 59.0%, respectively, compared to 2.5 t ha−1 PLB while the application of 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK increased the leaf biomass yield by 52.6% compared with 5 t ha−1 PLB. Similarly, 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK increased leaf biomass yield by 49.0% relative to the 7.5 t ha−1 PLB treatment.

Combined application of PLB and NPK fertilizers resulted in significant differences in fresh head yield of cabbage, with the control treatment recording the least (41.63 t ha−1) head yield while 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK gave the highest (72.12 t ha−1). Moreover, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK significantly (p < 0.05) increased cabbage head yield by 73.2, 57.8, 35.0, and 59.9% compared with the control, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB, 5 t ha−1 PLB, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB treatments, respectively; 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK also significantly increased head yield by 27% compared to the 50% NPK treatment but was not different from that of the 100% NPK, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK, 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK treatments. Application of 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK significantly increased the cabbage head yield by 47% relative to the 7.5 t ha−1 PLB treatment.

The effect of PLB application on agronomic use efficiency of nitrogen is as shown in Table 5. No significant differences were observed in nitrogen use efficiency with application of 50% NPK, 100% NPK, 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, and 2.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK treatments.

Effect of poultry litter biochar application on agronomic nitrogen use efficiency (ANUE)

Control = no amendment; 50% NPK = 45 kg ha−1 N, 30 kg ha−1 P2O5, 30 kg K2O; 100% NPK = 90 kg ha−1 N, 60 kg ha−1 P2O5, 60 kg ha−1 K2O. Values followed by the same letters in a column are not significantly different (DMRT) at 5% and vice versa. ND = not determined.

Application of 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK, however, significantly increased the nitrogen use efficiency (p < 0.05) by 133% compared with the 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK treatment. Similarly, 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK significantly (p < 0.05) increased nitrogen use efficiency by 101% compared to the 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK treatment while 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK increased the efficiency of nitrogen use by 27% compared with the 50% NPK treatment but this was not statistically significant.

An improvement was observed in soil chemical properties following the application of PLB and NPK fertilizers. Application of PLB resulted in significant increases in soil pH, organic carbon, available phosphorus, and CEC (Table 3). This corroborates the findings of Abiven et al. (2015) that biochar amendment improves soil chemical properties such as pH, organic carbon, and CEC. Akolgo et al. (2020) also observed an increase in soil pH following the application of biochar derived from sawdust and NPK fertilizer. The increase in soil pH following biochar application is a confirmation of biochar’s potential as a liming material for managing acidic soils. Biochar’s ability to increase soil pH is due to its alkaline nature arising from the inorganic minerals, i.e., carbonates, phosphates, and ash produced during pyrolysis and carbonization (Yuan et al. 2011).

PLB application significantly increased the SOC content, and this can be attributed to the high proportion of stable carbon in biochar, which is the highest among all the mineral elements contained in the ash (Yuan et al. 2011). The PLB used in this study had a carbon content of 38%, and this coupled with the recalcitrant nature of biochar to decomposition significantly contributed to the increase in the organic carbon content of the soil. Arif et al. (2017) also reported an improvement in SOC after biochar addition.

The available soil P and CEC increased in plots amended with PLB relative to the unamended control plots. The increase in the available soil P is due to biochar’s ability to increase extractable P (PO43−) in the soil solution either directly through its anion exchange capacity or by influencing the availability of the cations (Fe2+, Al3+ and Ca2+) that interact with P (Gundale and DeLuca 2007). This is made possible through biochar-mediated increase in soil pH, which prevents P from reacting with these cations by bonding of these metal cations and preventing P from being precipitated in solution through the formation of a complex. The increase in the available soil P is also due to the fact that PLB is rich in extractable soil nutrients such as P, K, Ca, and Mg as reported by Arif et al. (2017).

A significant increase was observed in CEC with increased application of PLB (Table 3). According to Atkinson et al. (2010), increases in CEC are as a result of increases in charge density per unit surface of organic matter (greater degree of oxidation) or increase in the surface area for the adsorption of cations or their combination. The increase in CEC as a result of biochar addition also confirms the report by Oladele et al. (2019) that biochar application improved the fertility of a highly weathered tropical soil through increased CEC.

Combined application of PLB and NPK fertilizers significantly increased the cabbage plant height, stem girth, leaf spread (Figures 1–3), and head yield (Table 4) over the unamended control plots, indicating the agronomic benefits of the applied amendments. Moreover, plots that received 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK had a 27% increase in cabbage yield compared with 50% NPK treatment. The increase in cabbage yield could be attributed to the PLB addition. The positive growth and yield response of cabbage to NPK fertilizer and PLB application confirm the low nutrient status of the soils under study, which is characteristic of highly weathered tropical soils. The response of cabbage to the application of PLB and NPK fertilizers could be attributed to the improvement in soil chemical properties.

In this study, the application of PLB significantly increased the soil pH, SOC, available phosphorus, and CEC of the soil (Table 3). The increase in soil pH from the moderately acidic (5.25) in the control plots to slightly alkaline (7.5) in the biochar amended plots brought the soil pH within the optimum range (6.5–7.0) for growing arable crops, where there is increased availability of key plant nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, etc., for plant uptake and growth (Shackley et al. 2016). Abiven et al. (2015) attributed growth and yield responses of crops following biochar application to biochar-induced improvement in soil properties such as increased soil pH, water-holding capacity, and CEC. The ability of biochar to alleviate soil acidity constraints through increased soil pH is one of the main effects of biochar on tropical soils (Jeffery et al. 2015).

The increased growth response of cabbage to biochar application could also be due to other biochar-mediated improvement in soil chemical properties such as increased soil nutrient content, CEC, and fertilizer use efficiency. The data in Table 3 indicate that the application of PLB increased SOC content, available phosphorus, and CEC. The increase in these soil chemical properties coupled with the ability of biochar to retain soil moisture through its large surface area and porosity enhanced soil nutrient retention and availability for plant uptake and growth. Increased soil carbon content is also an indication for high organic matter content which is the primary source of nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S) for plant growth in highly weathered tropical soils (Van Zwieten et al. 2010). An increase in soil organic matter content also improves the soil structure through soil aggregate formation which ensures a balance between air and water within the soil matrix to promote soil health and plant growth. This corroborates with the findings of Arif et al. (2017) and Oladele et al. (2019) that the beneficial effect of biochar addition on low-fertility tropical soil was through improvement in CEC, SOC, and supply of plant nutrients. Berihun et al. (2017) also observed increases in growth indices of garden pea after the application of biochar.

Combined application of PLB and NPK fertilizers significantly increased leaf biomass, head circumference, and head yield of cabbage compared with the unamended control and sole PLB application (Table 4). The increased yield response of cabbage to combined application of PLB and NPK fertilizers corroborates the work of Akolgo et al. (2020) who reported 7.7% increase in the yield of cabbage, following the application of 20 t ha−1 sawdust biochar on a loamy sand in Ghana. It is evident that in their study the yield increase was marginal compared with those obtained in this study where the application of PLB at a low rate of 2.5–7.5 t ha−1 + 100% NPK or 50% NPK increased the cabbage head yield on the average by 50 and 43% compared with the unamended control plots and sole PLB-treated plots, respectively. The yield differences could be due to the different types of biochar applied, as the agronomic value of biochar depends on the type of biomass feedstock, its nutrient content, and the pyrolysis temperature under which it is produced (Wang et al. 2013). Moreover, the effects of biochar on crop yield is influenced by factors such as the amount of biochar applied, characteristics of the biochar, and the soil type to which it is applied (Chen et al. 2019).

Biochar produced from poultry litter has been found to be rich in nutrients due to the large amounts of carbon and macro- and micro-nutrients contained in the poultry litter feedstock (Chan and Xu 2009). The PLB used in this study contained significant amounts of the primary plant nutrients (i.e., nitrogen; 21 g kg−1, phosphorus; 19 g kg−1, and potassium; 40 g kg−1, Table 2). The observed yield increase with combined application of PLB and NPK fertilizers could also be attributed to biochar’s direct effect of supply of additional nutrients and indirectly by improving soil chemical, physical, and biological properties which enhance the retention of fertilizer nutrients and plant growth (Srinivasaro et al. 2013). The improved growth parameters, i.e., plant height, stem girth, and leaf spread observed from the biochar amended plots also contributed to the yield increases in cabbage following the application of biochar and NPK fertilizer as biochar contributed to the supply and retention of nutrients needed for plant growth and biomass production through mineralization of its nutrients.

It is worth noting that the sole application of biochar, i.e., 2.5, 5, and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB, however, did not significantly increase cabbage fresh leaf biomass and head yields irrespective of the increase in the biochar application rates (Table 4). The lack of yield response of cabbage to sole PLB application can be explained by the fact that the nutrients in biochar alone could not meet the nutrient requirements of cabbage. This could also be attributed to the short period of time from biochar application and cabbage life span. This observation also supports the assertion by some authors that although biochar contains some amount of nutrients, its sole application does very little in directly contributing to the soil nutrient status; but rather its combined application with mineral or organic fertilizers results in crop yield enhancement. The increase in cabbage leaf biomass and head yield with combined application of PLB and NPK also confirms the report by Siddiqui et al. (2016) that biochar in spite of its low nutrient content can improve soil fertility and crop yield when it is applied in combination with other nutrient sources. This is made possible through biochar’s ability to reduce leaching of fertilizer nutrients particularly N by adsorption onto its surfaces and thereby increasing the use efficiency of applied N as observed in this study and thus confirming the report by Steiner et al. (2008).

The agronomic benefit of biochar application with NPK fertilizer was clearly evident in this study, where application of 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK gave the highest cabbage head yield (72.12 t ha−1) with a 27% increase in yield compared with the 50% NPK-treated plots (Table 4) as yield benefits of biochar addition. This partly confirms the assertion that combined application of biochar and inorganic fertilizers has the potential of increasing crop productivity while reducing the amount of inorganic fertilizer (De Gryze et al. 2010). In assessing the effect of biochar type and rate of application on maize yield indices, Yeboah et al. (2016) also reported that the application of corn cob biochar at a rate of 5 t ha−1 reduced mineral fertilizer input of maize by 50%. The ability of PLB to reduce mineral fertilizer input for cabbage was not consistent in this study and requires further study to validate it and determine how it is influenced by different biomass feedstock used in biochar production.

The increase in cabbage yield with the application of 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK can be attributed to increased N availability and improved fertilizer nutrient use efficiency following biochar application. In this study, the ability of biochar to improve the use efficiency of applied N was evident as application of 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK increased the N use efficiency relative to the 5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK and 7.5 t ha−1 PLB + 100% NPK treatments, respectively (Table 5). An increase in the N use efficiency will enhance the plant’s photosynthetic activity leading to high biomass production and increased yields. Amoakwah et al. (2017a) reported on the ability of biochar to improve the quality of sandy loam, where there was an improvement in the water-holding capacity (Amoakwah et al. 2017b) and subsequent reduction in the leaching of N fertilizer. Moreover, 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK resulting in the highest cabbage head yield could be attributed to the fact that plants that received this treatment had increased N use efficiency of 133% and the soil had the highest available P content of 104.43 ppm, representing an increase of 296% in the available soil P content relative to the control. The increase in soil P levels might have enhanced the plant root development for efficient absorption of water and nutrients for plant growth. The agronomic benefits of biochar addition to mineral fertilizer has been reported by many authors including Chan et al. (2008) who observed significant additional increases in radish yield which were in excess of that resulting from the application of fertilizer alone when PLB was applied together with nitrogen fertilizer. Liang et al. (2014) also reported increases in shoot biomass and crop yield as a result of biochar application.

The effect of biochar application on plant growth and yield also depends on the soil type as well as properties of the biochar applied. Although biochar generally increases the crop yield (El-Nagger et al. 2019), its effects have been shown to be more effective on soils with low to medium fertility levels than to highly fertile soils. The sandy nature of the soils under study also influenced its response to biochar application as biochar has been found to give more agronomic benefits when applied to coarse-textured (sandy) soils than fine-textured (clayey) soils (Wolf 2008). This is mainly due to the biochar’s ability to increase moisture retention in soils (Fischer et al. 2019). Improved water-holding capacity will enhance plant nutrition through improved absorption of dissolved nutrients for plant growth and development.

The results of this study have revealed that combined application of PLB and NPK fertilizers significantly improved the soil chemical properties, growth, and yield characteristics of cabbage. Application of 5 t ha−1 PLB + 50% NPK increased soil pH, organic carbon, available phosphorus, and CEC by 26.6, 41.4, 296, and 78.7%, respectively, relative to the control. PLB at 5 t ha−1 + 50% NPK fertilizer is the optimum application rate for cabbage production on soils at the study site as it increased cabbage yield by 73 and 27% compared with the control and 50% NPK treatments, respectively. This study recommends combined application of PLB and NPK fertilizer as an effective amendment to improve soil chemical properties, nutrient use efficiency, and yield of cabbage on the Ferric Acrisol.

The authors are thankful to the management of CSIR-Soil Research Institute for the financial, technical, and logistical support in carrying out this work. Permission to publish the article was received from the CSIR Soil Research Institute Editorial Committee and License to publish letter was signed by the corresponding author.

Funding information: The authors are grateful to the Microbiology Division of CSIR-Soil Research Institute for the financial support to the study.

Author contributions: PO and EY conceptualized the study; BA and KOAA installed the trial and collected data; GA and PO analyzed the data and wrote the first draft; EY approved the final draft and served as the corresponding author.

Conflict of interest: The authors state no conflict of interest.

Data availability statement: The datasets generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

© 2021 Patrick Ofori et al., published by De Gruyter

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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22 May, 2021
 

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Biochar for Climate Change Adaptation: Effect on Heavy Metal Composition of Telfairia …

22 May, 2021
 

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Biochar Fine Granules Market Regional Outlook, Leading Companies, Product, End Users for the …

22 May, 2021
 

LOS ANGELES, United States: The research study presented here is a highly detailed and meticulous account of almost all key aspects of the global Biochar Fine Granules market. It digs deep into market dynamics including growth drivers, challenges, restraints, trends, and opportunities. Market players can use the research study to tighten their grip on the global Biochar Fine Granules market as they gain sound understanding of market competition, regional growth, segmentation, and different cost structures. The report provides accurate market outlook in relation to CAGR, market size by value and volume, and market shares. It also provides carefully calculated and validated market figures related but not limited to revenue, production, consumption, gross margin, and price.

Get Full PDF Sample Copy of Report: (Including Full TOC, List of Tables & Figures, Chart) https://www.qyresearch.com/sample-form/form/2843399/global-biochar-fine-granules-industry

Besides a dashboard view of the vendor landscape and important company profiles, the competitive analysis offers an encyclopedic examination of the market structure. The company share analysis included in this study helps players to improve their business tactics and compete well against leading market participants. The intensity map prepared by our analysts helps to get a quick view of the presence of several players in the global Biochar Fine Granules market. The report also provides a footprint matrix of key players of the global Biochar Fine Granules market. It dives deep into growth strategies, sales footprint, production footprint, and product and application portfolios of prominent names of the industry.

Key players profiled in the report on the global Biochar Fine Granules Market are: Cool Planet Energy Systems, Biochar Supreme, NextChar, Terra Char, CharGrow, Pacific Biochar, Biochar Now, The Biochar Company (TBC)

Global Biochar Fine Granules Market by Product Type: Wood Source Biochar, Corn Source Biochar, Wheat Source Biochar, Others

Global Biochar Fine Granules Market by Application: Soil Conditioner, Fertilizer, Others

This section of the Biochar Fine Granules report includes segmentation such as application, product type, and end user. These segmentations aid in determining parts of Biochar Fine Granules market that will progress more than others.  The segmentation analysis provides information about the key elements that are thriving the specific segments better than others. It helps readers to understand strategies to make sound investments. The global Biochar Fine Granules market is segmented on the basis of product type, applications, and its end users.

Key questions answered in the report:

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Table od Content

1 Report Overview
1.1 Biochar Fine Granules Research Scope
1.2 Market Segment by Type
1.2.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Market Size Growth Rate by Type
1.2.2 Wood Source Biochar
1.2.3 Corn Source Biochar
1.2.4 Wheat Source Biochar
1.2.5 Others
1.3 Market Segment by Application
1.3.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Market Size Growth Rate by Application
1.3.2 Soil Conditioner
1.3.3 Fertilizer
1.3.4 Others
1.4 Study Objectives
1.5 Years Considered

2 Global Market Production
2.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Production Capacity (2016-2027)
2.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Production by Region: 2016 VS 2021 VS 2027
2.3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Production by Region
2.3.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Historic Production by Region (2016-2021)
2.3.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Forecasted Production by Region (2022-2027)
2.3.3 North America
2.3.4 Europe
2.3.5 Japan
2.36 China
2.3.7 South Korea
2.3.8 India
2.4 Industry Trends
2.4.1 Biochar Fine Granules Industry Trends
2.4.2 Biochar Fine Granules Market Drivers
2.4.3 Biochar Fine Granules Market Challenges
2.4.4 Biochar Fine Granules Market Restraints

3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Sales
3.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Sales Estimates and Forecasts 2016-2027
3.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Revenue Estimates and Forecasts 2016-2027
3.3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Region: 2016 VS 2021 VS 2027
3.4 Global Top Biochar Fine Granules Regions by Sales
3.4.1 Global Top Biochar Fine Granules Regions by Sales (2016-2021)
3.4.2 Global Top Biochar Fine Granules Regions by Sales (2022-2027)
3.5 Global Top Biochar Fine Granules Regions by Revenue
3.5.1 Global Top Biochar Fine Granules Regions by Revenue (2016-2021)
3.5.2 Global Top Biochar Fine Granules Regions by Revenue (2022-2027)
3.5.3 North America
3.5.4 Europe
3.5.5 Asia-Pacific
3.5.6 Latin America
3.5.7 Middle East & Africa

4 Competition by Manufacturers
4.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Production Capacity by Manufacturers
4.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Manufacturers
4.2.1 Global Top Biochar Fine Granules Manufacturers by Sales (2016-2021)
4.2.2 Global Top Biochar Fine Granules Manufacturers Market Share by Sales (2016-2021)
4.2.3 Global Top 10 and Top 5 Companies by Biochar Fine Granules Sales in 2020
4.3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Manufacturers
4.3.1 Global Top Biochar Fine Granules Manufacturers by Revenue (2016-2021)
4.3.2 Global Top Biochar Fine Granules Manufacturers Market Share by Revenue (2016-2021)
4.3.3 Global Top 10 and Top 5 Companies by Biochar Fine Granules Revenue in 2020
4.4 Global Biochar Fine Granules Sales Price by Manufacturers
4.5 Analysis of Competitive Landscape
4.5.1 Manufacturers Market Concentration Ratio (CR5 and HHI)
4.5.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2, and Tier 3)
4.5.3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Manufacturers Geographical Distribution
4.6 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion Plans

5 Estimates and Forecasts by Type
5.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Type
5.1.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Historical Sales by Type (2016-2021)
5.1.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Forecasted Sales by Type (2022-2027)
5.1.3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Sales Market Share by Type (2016-2027)
5.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Type
5.2.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Historical Revenue by Type (2016-2021)
5.2.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Forecasted Revenue by Type (2022-2027)
5.2.3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Revenue Market Share by Type (2016-2027)
5.3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Price by Type
5.3.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Price by Type (2016-2021)
5.3.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Price Forecast by Type (2022-2027)

6 Market Size by Application
6.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Application
6.1.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Historical Sales by Application (2016-2021)
6.1.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Forecasted Sales by Application (2022-2027)
6.1.3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Sales Market Share by Application (2016-2027)
6.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Application
6.2.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Historical Revenue by Application (2016-2021)
6.2.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Forecasted Revenue by Application (2022-2027)
6.2.3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Revenue Market Share by Application (2016-2027)
6.3 Global Biochar Fine Granules Price by Application
6.3.1 Global Biochar Fine Granules Price by Application (2016-2021)
6.3.2 Global Biochar Fine Granules Price Forecast by Application (2022-2027)

7 North America
7.1 North America Biochar Fine Granules Sales Breakdown by Company
7.1.1 North America Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Company (2016-2021)
7.1.2 North America Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Company (2016-2021)
7.2 North America Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Type
7.2.1 North America Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Type (2016-2027)
7.2.2 North America Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Type (2016-2027)
7.3 North America Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Application
7.3.1 North America Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Application (2016-2027)
7.3.2 North America Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Application (2016-2027)
7.4 North America Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Country
7.4.1 North America Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Country (2016-2027)
7.4.2 North America Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Country (2016-2027)
7.4.3 U.S.
7.4.4 Canada

8 Europe
8.1 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Sales Breakdown by Company
8.1.1 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Company (2016-2021)
8.1.2 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Company (2016-2021)
8.2 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Type
8.2.1 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Type (2016-2028)
8.2.2 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Type (2016-2028)
8.3 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Application
8.3.1 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Application (2016-2028)
8.3.2 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Application (2016-2028)
8.4 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Country
8.4.1 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Country (2016-2028)
8.4.2 Europe Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Country (2016-2028)
8.4.3 Germany
8.4.4 France
8.4.5 U.K.
8.4.6 Italy
8.4.7 Russia

9 Asia Pacific
9.1 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Sales Breakdown by Company
9.1.1 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Company (2016-2021)
9.1.2 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Company (2016-2021)
9.2 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Type
9.2.1 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Type (2016-2029)
9.2.2 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Type (2016-2029)
9.3 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Application
9.3.1 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Application (2016-2029)
9.3.2 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Application (2016-2029)
9.4 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Region
9.4.1 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Region (2016-2029)
9.4.2 Asia Pacific Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Region (2016-2029)
9.4.3 China
9.4.4 Japan
9.4.5 South Korea
9.4.6 India
9.4.7 Australia
9.4.8 Taiwan
9.4.9 Indonesia
9.4.10 Thailand
9.4.11 Malaysia
9.4.12 Philippines

10 Latin America
10.1 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Sales Breakdown by Company
10.1.1 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Company (2016-2021)
10.1.2 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Company (2016-2021)
10.2 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Type
10.2.1 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Type (2016-20210)
10.2.2 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Type (2016-20210)
10.3 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Application
10.3.1 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Application (2016-20210)
10.3.2 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Application (2016-20210)
10.4 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Country
10.4.1 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Country (2016-20210)
10.4.2 Latin America Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Country (2016-20210)
10.4.3 Mexico
10.4.4 Brazil
10.4.5 Argentina

11 Middle East and Africa
11.1 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Sales Breakdown by Company
11.1.1 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Company (2016-2021)
11.1.2 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Company (2016-2021)
11.2 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Type
11.2.1 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Type (2016-20211)
11.2.2 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Type (2016-20211)
11.3 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Application
11.3.1 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Application (2016-20211)
11.3.2 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Application (2016-20211)
11.4 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Market Size by Country
11.4.1 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Sales by Country (2016-20211)
11.4.2 Middle East and Africa Biochar Fine Granules Revenue by Country (2016-20211)
11.4.3 Turkey
11.4.4 Saudi Arabia
11.4.5 UAE

12 Company Profiles
12.1 Cool Planet Energy Systems
12.1.1 Cool Planet Energy Systems Corporation Information
12.1.2 Cool Planet Energy Systems Overview
12.1.3 Cool Planet Energy Systems Biochar Fine Granules Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2016-2021)
12.1.4 Cool Planet Energy Systems Biochar Fine Granules Products and Services
12.1.5 Cool Planet Energy Systems Biochar Fine Granules SWOT Analysis
12.1.6 Cool Planet Energy Systems Recent Developments
12.2 Biochar Supreme
12.2.1 Biochar Supreme Corporation Information
12.2.2 Biochar Supreme Overview
12.2.3 Biochar Supreme Biochar Fine Granules Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2016-2021)
12.2.4 Biochar Supreme Biochar Fine Granules Products and Services
12.2.5 Biochar Supreme Biochar Fine Granules SWOT Analysis
12.2.6 Biochar Supreme Recent Developments
12.3 NextChar
12.3.1 NextChar Corporation Information
12.3.2 NextChar Overview
12.3.3 NextChar Biochar Fine Granules Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2016-2021)
12.3.4 NextChar Biochar Fine Granules Products and Services
12.3.5 NextChar Biochar Fine Granules SWOT Analysis
12.3.6 NextChar Recent Developments
12.4 Terra Char
12.4.1 Terra Char Corporation Information
12.4.2 Terra Char Overview
12.4.3 Terra Char Biochar Fine Granules Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2016-2021)
12.4.4 Terra Char Biochar Fine Granules Products and Services
12.4.5 Terra Char Biochar Fine Granules SWOT Analysis
12.4.6 Terra Char Recent Developments
12.5 CharGrow
12.5.1 CharGrow Corporation Information
12.5.2 CharGrow Overview
12.5.3 CharGrow Biochar Fine Granules Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2016-2021)
12.5.4 CharGrow Biochar Fine Granules Products and Services
12.5.5 CharGrow Biochar Fine Granules SWOT Analysis
12.5.6 CharGrow Recent Developments
12.6 Pacific Biochar
12.6.1 Pacific Biochar Corporation Information
12.6.2 Pacific Biochar Overview
12.6.3 Pacific Biochar Biochar Fine Granules Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2016-2021)
12.6.4 Pacific Biochar Biochar Fine Granules Products and Services
12.6.5 Pacific Biochar Biochar Fine Granules SWOT Analysis
12.6.6 Pacific Biochar Recent Developments
12.7 Biochar Now
12.7.1 Biochar Now Corporation Information
12.7.2 Biochar Now Overview
12.7.3 Biochar Now Biochar Fine Granules Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2016-2021)
12.7.4 Biochar Now Biochar Fine Granules Products and Services
12.7.5 Biochar Now Biochar Fine Granules SWOT Analysis
12.7.6 Biochar Now Recent Developments
12.8 The Biochar Company (TBC)
12.8.1 The Biochar Company (TBC) Corporation Information
12.8.2 The Biochar Company (TBC) Overview
12.8.3 The Biochar Company (TBC) Biochar Fine Granules Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2016-2021)
12.8.4 The Biochar Company (TBC) Biochar Fine Granules Products and Services
12.8.5 The Biochar Company (TBC) Biochar Fine Granules SWOT Analysis
12.8.6 The Biochar Company (TBC) Recent Developments

13 Value Chain and Sales Channels Analysis
13.1 Biochar Fine Granules Value Chain Analysis
13.2 Biochar Fine Granules Key Raw Materials
13.2.1 Key Raw Materials
13.2.2 Raw Materials Key Suppliers
13.3 Biochar Fine Granules Production Mode & Process
13.4 Biochar Fine Granules Sales and Marketing
13.4.1 Biochar Fine Granules Sales Channels
13.4.2 Biochar Fine Granules Distributors
13.5 Biochar Fine Granules Customers

14 Key Findings
15 Appendix
15.1 Research Methodology
15.1.1 Methodology/Research Approach
15.1.2 Data Source
15.2 Author Details
15.3 Disclaimer

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Planting forests to combat climate change is ineffective

22 May, 2021
 

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Some climate activists advocate for large-scale tree planting campaigns in forests around the world to absorb carbon dioxide. It traps heat and helps slow climate change. “We cannot plant to get out of the climate crisis”, says David Breshears of the University of Arizona, one of the leading experts on tree mortality and forest death in the Western United States. His co-author is Jonathan Overpeck, dean of the School of Environment and Sustainability at the University of Michigan and an expert in paleoclimate and climate-vegetation interactions.

Instead of wasting money planting many trees in a way that is destined to fail, the researchers say, it makes more sense to focus on keeping existing forests healthy so that they continue to act as carbon “sinks”, removing carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and storing it in trees and soil. At the same time, emissions must be reduced as much as possible and as quickly as possible.

Overpeck and Breshears say they hope that the role of the world’s forests – and in particular the urgent need to protect existing forests and keep them intact – will be fully discussed when global leaders on climate action meet at the COP26 climate change conference to be held in Glasgow next November.

“Policy makers must enable new scientific, political and financial mechanisms optimized for the change of disturbance and vegetation that is unstoppable, and also to ensure that the trees and forests we want to plant or conserve because of the carbon they sequester survive in the face of climate change and other human threats“Overpeck and Breshears write.

“If we fail to overcome this challenge,” they continue, “large terrestrial carbon stocks will be lost to the atmosphere, accelerating climate change and the impacts on vegetation that threaten many more ecosystem services on which human beings depend. humans”. Keeping forests healthy will require a new approach to forest management, which Overpeck and Breshears call managing for change. As a first step, the political leaders and managers of the territory they must recognize that new large-scale changes in vegetation are inevitable.

Climate change has been implicated in record-breaking wildfires in the western United States, Australia and elsewhere, as well as widespread tree extinctions that are largely due to hotter and drier weather extremes. According to Overpeck and Breshears, These disturbing trends are expected to accelerate as the climate warms.

“Even in a world where climate change stops soon, global temperature rise will likely reach 1.5 to 2 C above pre-industrial levels, with all the associated extreme heat waves, and therefore global vegetation will face up to twice the climate change already experienced“They write. At the same time, deforestation continues to increase around the world and is especially damaging in tropical forests, which are home to large amounts of biodiversity and sequestered carbon.

According to Overpeck and Breshears, the next step towards a new management paradigm for change is to proactively manage forests for the vegetation changes that can be anticipated, instead of trying to keep the forests as they were in the 20th century. Managing for change means, for example, more aggressive thinning of forests to reduce the accumulation of fuels that fuel massive forest fires. It also means selectively replacing some trees – after a forest fire, for example – that are no longer in optimal climate zones with new species that will thrive now and for decades to come.

According to the researchers, these activities, when necessary, will inevitably increase the costs of forest management. But those costs should be seen as a prudent investment, helping to preserve an undervalued service that forests provide to humanity for free: carbon storage, also known as carbon sequestration.

Forests are already managed to preserve natural resources and the ecosystem services they provide. In addition to supplying wood, firewood, fiber, and other products, forests clean the air, filter water, and help control erosion and flooding. They preserve biodiversity and promote soil formation and nutrient cycling, while offering recreational opportunities such as hiking, camping, fishing and hunting.

Carbon sequestration should be high on the list of invaluable services forests provide, and efforts to preserve and enhance this vital function should be funded accordingly, Overpeck and Breshears say.

For example, there is a great opportunity to improve the ability of forests to store carbon through increased use of biochar, a form of charcoal that is produced by exposing waste organic matter – such as wood chips, carbon residues. crops or manure – to heat in a low oxygen environment. The large amounts of wood generated during forest clearing projects could be turned into biochar, and then added to forest soils to improve their health and increase the amount of carbon that is storedsays Overpeck.

“Clearing forests, converting extracted wood to biochar and burying biochar in forest soils is one way to bring new jobs to forested rural areas, while allowing forests to play a more important role. important in removing carbon from the atmosphere and, therefore, in the fight against climate change –he affirms–. Managing forest carbon could be a boon for rural areas that need new economic engines. “

In the long term, these projects are likely to benefit forests and increase their capacity to store carbon much more than mass tree planting campaigns carried out without proper management strategies, according to Overpeck and Breshears.

“Planting trees is very attractive to some climate activists because it is easy and it is not that expensive,” says Breshears. “But it is like draining water with a big hole in the bucket: Although adding more trees it can help slow the ongoing warming, at the same time we are losing trees to that ongoing warming. “

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Biochar Market | COVID-19 Impact Analysis, Regional Growth With Top Players Data | Pacific …

22 May, 2021
 

The research report on Biochar Market has incorporated the analysis of various factors that augment the market’s growth. It shows the trends, restraints, and drivers that transform the market in either a positive or negative manner. The Biochar Market report also provides the scope of various segments and applications which will potentially influence the market within the future.The report also provides insightful particulars of the prevailing policies, laws, alongside guidelines.

Summary:

Global biochar market is expected to rise to an estimated value of USD 3.92 billion by 2026, registering a healthy CAGR in the forecast period of 2019-2026. Rising consumption of livestock feed and rapidly growing agricultural industry are the major factors for the growth of this market.

Few of the major competitors currently working in the global biochar market are Cool Planet, Pacific Biochar Benefit Corporation, Genesis Industries, LLC, CharGrow USA LLC, Black Owl Biochar, Phoenix Energy Group, Airex Énergie Inc., Ambient Energy LLC, Avello Bioenergy, ETIA Group, CharGrow USA LLC, Pyrocal Pty Ltd, Terra Humana Ltd, American BioChar Company, Bioforcetech Corporation, ECOERA Millennium Biochar and Carbon Emission Removal Service, Biochar Now, llc., EkoBalans Fenix, Carbo Culture, GreenBack Pte Ltd and others.

Request a Sample Copy of Biochar Market Report @https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/request-a-sample/?dbmr=global-biochar-market

The Biochar Market report is an appropriate compilation of all necessary data for the residential, industrial and commercials buyers, manufacturers, governments, and other stakeholders to implement their market-centric tactics in line with the projected also because the prevailing trends within the Biochar Market.

Key pointers of the Biochar Market Report:

The Biochar Market report provides details of latest recent developments, trade regulations, import export analysis, production analysis, value chain optimization, market share, impact of domestic and localized market players. The Biochar Market Report analyses opportunities in terms of emerging revenue pockets, changes in market regulations, strategic market growth analysis, market size, category market growths, application niches and dominance, product approvals, product launches, geographical expansions, technological innovations within the market.

Key Questions answered by the Biochar Market Report:

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Finally, the Biochar Market Report may be a credible source of marketing research which will accelerate your business exponentially. The report gives the foremost important regional framework conditions, economic situations with item value, advantage, limit, production, supply, demand, market development rate and number, etc. Biochar Industry Report Also includes a replacement SWOT review task, speculative test research, and company return on investment research.

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Data Bridge set forth itself as an unconventional and neoteric Market research and consulting firm with unparalleled level of resilience and integrated approaches. We are determined to unearth the best market opportunities and foster efficient information for your business to thrive in the market. Data Bridge endeavors to provide appropriate solutions to the complex business challenges and initiates an effortless decision-making process.We ponder into the heterogeneous markets in accord with our clients needs and scoop out the best possible solutions and detailed information about the market trends. Data Bridge delve into the markets across Asia, North America, South America, Africa to name few.Data Bridge adepts in creating satisfied clients who reckon upon our services and rely on our hard work with certitude. We are content with our glorious 99.9 % client satisfying rate.

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Peroxymonosulfate activation by tea residue biochar loaded with Fe3O4 for the degradation of …

22 May, 2021
 

(AGENPARL) – LONDON (UNITED KINGDOM), sab 22 maggio 2021

Fonte/Source: http://feeds.rsc.org/~r/rss/ra/~3/xrVv9zMpX60/D1RA01640G

listenButton2.onclick = function(){ if(responsiveVoice.isPlaying()){ responsiveVoice.cancel(); }else{ responsiveVoice.speak(“(AGENPARL) – LONDON (UNITED KINGDOM), sab 22 maggio 2021 RSC Adv., 2021, 11,18525-18538DOI: 10.1039/D1RA01640G, Paper Open Access &nbsp This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence. Qirui Wang, Yixuan Shi, Shiyi Lv, Ying Liang, Pengfei XiaoThe prepared tea residue biochar loaded with Fe3O4 has high-efficiency and environmental potential for activating peroxymonosulfate to degrade tetracycline hydrochloride.The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry Fonte/Source: http://feeds.rsc.org/~r/rss/ra/~3/xrVv9zMpX60/D1RA01640G”, “Italian Female”); } };


Peroxymonosulfate activation by tea residue biochar loaded with Fe3O4 for the degradation of …

22 May, 2021
 

The recycling of agricultural and food waste is an effective way to reduce resource waste and ameliorate the shortage of natural resources. The treatment of antibiotic wastewater is a current research hotspot. In this study, waste tea residue was used as a raw material to prepare biochar (T-BC) and loaded with Fe3O4 as a catalyst to activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for oxidative degradation of tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH). Analysis techniques such as BET, SEM, XRD, FT-IR, XPS and VSM indicated that the heterogeneous catalyst (Fe3O4@T-BC) with good surface properties and magnetic properties was successfully prepared. The results of batch-scale experiments illustrated that when the dose of the Fe3O4@T-BC catalyst was 1 g L−1, the concentration of PMS was 1 g L−1, and the initial pH was 7, the degradation rate of TCH with a concentration of 50 mg L−1 reached 97.89% after 60 minutes of reaction. When the initial pH was 11, the degradation rate of TCH reached 99.86%. After the catalyst was recycled four times using an external magnet, the degradation rate of TCH could still reach 71.32%. The data of removal of TCH could be best fitted by a pseudo-first-order model. The analysis of the degradation mechanism through a free radical quenching experiment and EPR analysis, as well as the exploration of TCH intermediate products and reaction paths through the LC-MS method, all confirmed that the Fe3O4@T-BC prepared by this method is expected to become a cost-effective and environmentally friendly heterogeneous catalyst for activating persulfate degradation of tetracycline antibiotics.

Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.


Peroxymonosulfate activation by tea residue biochar loaded with Fe3O4 for the degradation of …

22 May, 2021
 

The recycling of agricultural and food waste is an effective way to reduce resource waste and ameliorate the shortage of natural resources. The treatment of antibiotic wastewater is a current research hotspot. In this study, waste tea residue was used as a raw material to prepare biochar (T-BC) and loaded with Fe3O4 as a catalyst to activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for oxidative degradation of tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH). Analysis techniques such as BET, SEM, XRD, FT-IR, XPS and VSM indicated that the heterogeneous catalyst (Fe3O4@T-BC) with good surface properties and magnetic properties was successfully prepared. The results of batch-scale experiments illustrated that when the dose of the Fe3O4@T-BC catalyst was 1 g L−1, the concentration of PMS was 1 g L−1, and the initial pH was 7, the degradation rate of TCH with a concentration of 50 mg L−1 reached 97.89% after 60 minutes of reaction. When the initial pH was 11, the degradation rate of TCH reached 99.86%. After the catalyst was recycled four times using an external magnet, the degradation rate of TCH could still reach 71.32%. The data of removal of TCH could be best fitted by a pseudo-first-order model. The analysis of the degradation mechanism through a free radical quenching experiment and EPR analysis, as well as the exploration of TCH intermediate products and reaction paths through the LC-MS method, all confirmed that the Fe3O4@T-BC prepared by this method is expected to become a cost-effective and environmentally friendly heterogeneous catalyst for activating persulfate degradation of tetracycline antibiotics.

Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.


Role of biochar from corn straw in influencing crack propagation and evaporation in sodic soils …

22 May, 2021
 

Biochar can change the drying and cracking characteristics of sodic soil.

The biochar improved the soil texture and reducd the bulk density of soil.

The addition of biochar increased the content of soil organic matter.

The biochar increased the water retention capacity in the soil.

Biochar can change the drying and cracking characteristics of sodic soil.

The biochar improved the soil texture and reducd the bulk density of soil.

The addition of biochar increased the content of soil organic matter.

The biochar increased the water retention capacity in the soil.

Soil degradation has become one of the serious global environmental problems, biochar is a recyclable natural material which has been widely used in soil remediation. Soil cracking can significantly change the migration path of water and nutrients in the soil, which affects the remediation performance of biochar and plant growth. The effects of different amounts of corn straw biochar on the evaporation and drying shrinkage characteristics of sodic soil are investigated in this paper. Different amounts (by mass) of biochar: 0%, 1%, 2%, 4% and 8% are added to the soil. A customized experimental device is used to measure the rate of evaporation of water and record the images of surface crack development of the samples during drying. Using image processing technology, the crack rate, crack entropy and fractal dimension of the cracks are obtained. The experimental results show that: (1) biochar can change the drying and cracking characteristics of sodic soil by changing the evaporation process of the soil. With biochar contents of 1%, 2%, and 4%, the residual water contents of soil samples are decreased by 4.83%, 43.94% and 85.71%, respectively. With an 8% biochar content, the residual water content of soil sample is increased by 64.49%, (2) the addition of biochar reduces the rate of cracking and fractal dimension of sodic soil. With an 8% biochar content, the rate of cracking and fracture fractal dimension are reduced by 46.39% and 13.74%, respectively, (3) the addition of biochar can effectively reduce the degree of the disorderly arrangement of surface cracks. At biochar contents of 2%, 4% and 8%, the crack entropies are decreased by 2.22%, 6.46% and 7.37%, respectively, and (4) the mechanisms in which biochar changes crack development in sodic soil are: (a) improving the soil texture and reducing the bulk density of soil and (b) increasing the number of water migration channels, soil aggregates and the water retention capacity in the soil.


Bamboo Biochar Lava Stone Soap for Hands and Feet – Kessica Kolchins

22 May, 2021
 

Bamboo Biochar & Lava Rock Soap
for Deep Cleanse of Hands and Feet
Blue Sky Body Care is beyond soap — a hand-crafted
small batch yucca-based product line. Highest natural
source of resveratrol. Anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial
with no fragrance added. Biodegradable and gray
water and Vegan friendly with 100% natural organic ingredients:
Saponified Coconut Oil, Olive Oil & Sunflower Oil,
Bamboo Biochar Powder, Lava Rock Powder,
Colloidal Oatmeal, Yucca Root Powder

Bamboo Biochar & Lava Rock Soap
for Deep Cleanse of Hands and Feet
Blue Sky Body Care is beyond soap — a hand-crafted
small batch yucca-based product line. Highest natural
source of resveratrol. Anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial
with no fragrance added. Biodegradable and gray
water and Vegan friendly with 100% natural organic ingredients:
Saponified Coconut Oil, Olive Oil & Sunflower Oil,
Bamboo Biochar Powder, Lava Rock Powder,
Colloidal Oatmeal, Yucca Root Powder


Optimising pyrolysis conditions for high-quality biochar production using black soldier fly larvae …

22 May, 2021
 

The disposal of feacal matter from Urine Diversion Dry Toilets is a significant challenge due to limited land availability, possible underground water contamination, and the risk of spreading diseases. The collected faecal matter can be fed to Black Soldier Fly Larvae to produce protein-rich larvae used as animal feed. The disposal of the leftover waste (BSFL residue) is still a problem due to the risk of residual pathogen contamination. The BSFL residue contains residual plant nutrients and can be further processed into biochar. Faecal matter biochar offers an exciting value proposition where the pyrolysis process guarantees a 100% pathogen elimination. It also results in significant waste reduction in transport, storage weight, and volume. A preliminary study was conducted to (i) optimise pyrolysis conditions (optimal temperature treatment and residence time) for biochar production using residue obtained after faecal matter from urine diversion dry toilets was fed to black soldier fly larvae as feedstock; and (ii) determine the physicochemical and morphological characteristics of biochar produced. The residue was pyrolysed at 300, 400, and 500 °C and characterised for chemical, biological and physical characteristics. Surface area (6.61 m2 g−1), pore size, and C: N (9.28) ratio increased at 500 °C for 30 min. Exchangeable bases, (Calcium) Ca, (Magnesium) Mg, (Potassium) K, and (Sodium) Na increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature. The increase in basic cations resulted in an increase in pH from 6.7 in the residue to 9.8 in biochar pyrolysed at 500 °C. Biochar pyrolysed at 500 °C can therefore be used to improve acidic soils. Phosphorus increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature to 3 148 mg kg−1 at 500 °C. Biochar produced at 500 °C for 30 min had desirable characteristics: surface area, exchangeable bases, and pH. Also, biochar can be used as a phosphorus source with potential for crop production, although an external nitrogen source is needed to meet crop nutrient requirements.


BIOMASS TO BIOCHAR CONVERSION IN SUBCRITICAL WATER – diagram, schematic, and …

22 May, 2021
 

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Global Fine Biochar Powder Market Research Report 2020-2026

22 May, 2021
 

Under COVID-19 Outbreak, how the Fine Biochar Powder Industry will develop is also analyzed in detail in Chapter 1.7 of the report.
In Chapter 2.4, we analyzed industry trends in the context of COVID-19.
In Chapter 3.5, we analyzed the impact of COVID-19 on the product industry chain based on the upstream and downstream markets.
In Chapters 6 to 10 of the report, we analyze the impact of COVID-19 on various regions and major countries.
In chapter 13.5, the impact of COVID-19 on the future development of the industry is pointed out.

A holistic study of the market is made by considering a variety of factors, from demographics conditions and business cycles in a particular country to market-specific microeconomic impacts. The study found the shift in market paradigms in terms of regional competitive advantage and the competitive landscape of major players.

Also Read: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/global-pemetrexed-diacid-market-by-type-by-application-by-segmentation-by-region-and-by-country-2021-2021-04-14

Key players in the global Fine Biochar Powder market covered in Chapter 4:
BioChar Products
Swiss Biochar GmbH
Carbon Terra
The Biochar Company
Diacarbon Energy
Kina
Carbon Gold
BlackCarbon
ElementC6
Biochar Now
Cool Planet
Agri-Tech Producers

Also Read: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/global-cordless-drills-market-size-share-value-and-competitive-landscape-2024-2021-04-16

In Chapter 11 and 13.3, on the basis of types, the Fine Biochar Powder market from 2015 to 2026 is primarily split into:
Wood Source Biochar
Corn  Source Biochar
Wheat  Source Biochar
Others

In Chapter 12 and 13.4, on the basis of applications, the Fine Biochar Powder market from 2015 to 2026 covers:
Soil Conditioner
Fertilizer
Others

Geographically, the detailed analysis of consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate, historic and forecast (2015-2026) of the following regions are covered in Chapter 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13:
North America (Covered in Chapter 6 and 13)
United States
Canada
Mexico

Also Read: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/global-cotton-and-cotton-seed-industry-marketsize-share-value-and-competitive-landscape-2020-2021-04-19

Europe (Covered in Chapter 7 and 13)
Germany
UK
France
Italy
Spain
Russia
Others
Asia-Pacific (Covered in Chapter 8 and 13)
China
Japan
South Korea
Australia
India
Southeast Asia
Others

Also Read: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/global-glucagon-like-peptide-1-receptor-agonists-market-outlook-industry-analysis-and-prospect-2021-2021-04-22

Middle East and Africa (Covered in Chapter 9 and 13)
Saudi Arabia
UAE
Egypt
Nigeria
South Africa
Others
South America (Covered in Chapter 10 and 13)
Brazil
Argentina
Columbia
Chile
Others

Years considered for this report:
Historical Years: 2015-2019
Base Year: 2019
Estimated Year: 2020
Forecast Period: 2020-2026

Table of Content

1 Report Overview
1.1 Study Scope
1.2 Key Market Segments
1.3 Regulatory Scenario by Region/Country
1.4 Market Investment Scenario Strategic
1.5 Market Analysis by Type

Also Read: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/global-manganese-test-kits-market-outlook-industry-analysis-and-prospect-2021–2027-2021-04-29

1.5.1 Global Fine Biochar Powder Market Share by Type (2020-2026)
1.5.2 Wood Source Biochar
1.5.3 Corn  Source Biochar
1.5.4 Wheat  Source Biochar
1.5.5 Others
Also Read: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/global-dry-powder-inhaler-device-market-insights-overview-analysis-and-forecast-2021-2026-2021-04-02

1.6 Market by Application
1.6.1 Global Fine Biochar Powder Market Share by Application (2020-2026)
1.6.2 Soil Conditioner
1.6.3 Fertilizer
1.6.4 Others
1.7 Fine Biochar Powder Industry Development Trends under COVID-19 Outbreak
1.7.1 Global COVID-19 Status Overview

… continued

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Social Icons :: Biochar Network NZ

22 May, 2021
 

I'd like  to see the above text turn dark in this instance and then this box deleted. Otherwise, we need a plan B.

© C5BOX – Responsive


Biochar Production Method and Composition Therefrom – diagram, schematic, and image 05

22 May, 2021
 

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How much carbon can we remove from the atmosphere? British academics launch programme to …

23 May, 2021
 

Universities across the UK have teamed up to assess how tree planting, peat bog restoration and bioenergy could help the country reach net zero emissions.  

The £30m research programme will assess how effective carbon removal techniques are at locking away carbon emissions, and how far they could be scaled up to help the UK meet its climate goals.

In total 12 universities are taking part in the government-funded project, led by the University of Oxford. Experts will study data from five demonstrator projects to test the most effective approaches for mass carbon removal from the atmosphere.  

That will include assessing the best trees to plant in afforestation projects and testing the potential of biochar – a charcoal-like material – to sequester carbon. Bioenergy crops like grasses and willow will be tested in Lincolnshire, while ground-up silicate rocks will be spread across fields in Wales and Devon to investigate their ability to boost soil carbon.  

“Greenhouse gas removal is essential to achieve net zero carbon emissions and stabilise the climate,” said Professor Cameron Hepburn from the University of Oxford. “Alongside the need for much faster emissions reductions now, we also need to start pulling CO2 out of the atmosphere.” 

Researchers will also look at how far greenhouse gas removal projects could create new job opportunities, and whether the public will embrace such large-scale changes to the UK landscape.  

‘Greenhouse gas removal is not only essential, it also has the potential to become big business,” Professor Hepburn added. “As we rebuild societies and economies following Covid-19, we have an opportunity to orient ourselves towards the green jobs and industries of the future.” 


Biofuels Market Revenue, Demand, Share, Size | Global Industry Analysis and Research Report …

23 May, 2021
 

The Global Biofuels Market report provides vital information that prepares market players to give fierce competition to their toughest competitors based on growth, sales, and revenue, among other essential factors. The research study sheds light on the key growth opportunities and market trends along with other vital market dynamics, including the drivers and restraints on the industry growth. With this report, the prospective buyers can be sure to become capable of adapting to the changes in the Biofuels industry.

The report gives a comprehensive overview of the global market scenario after evaluating the available data and market trends. This study performs a thorough examination of the available data to predict the prospective market growth in the forecast period. The study examines historical data collected from the years 2014 and 2018 and considers 2019 as the base year to project the growth of the industry until the year 2027. It performs a detailed analysis of the market size, share, demand, trends, revenue, and sales to track the development of the industry through the years.

Click To get FREE SAMPLE PDF (Including Full TOC, Table & Figures) @ https://www.marketexpertz.com/sample-enquiry-form/13833

The major manufacturers covered in this report:

Diester Industries, Neste Oil Rotterdam, ADM, Infinita Renovables, Biopetrol, Cargill, Ital Green Oil, Glencore, Louis Dreyfus, Renewable Energy Group, RBF Port Neches, Ag Processing, Elevance, Marathon Petroleum Corporation, Evergreen Bio Fuels, Minnesota Soybean Processors, Caramuru, Jinergy, Hebei Jingu Group, Longyan Zhuoyue, Shandong Jinjiang, Poet, Valero, Green Plains, Flint Hills Resources, Abengoa Bioenergy, Pacific Ethanol, CropEnergies, Raizen, The Andersons, BP, Big River Resources, Vivergo, Jilin Fuel Ethanol, China Agri-Industries Holdings, Tianguan Group, COFCO Biochemical (AnHui) Others

Most important Products of Biofuels covered in this report are:

Bioethanol, Biodiesel, Others

On the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications:

Solid (Biocoal, Biochar, and Fuel Pellets), Liquid (Biodiesel and Bioethanol), Gaseous (Biogas, Biopropane, and Syngas)

The industry experts have left no stone unturned to identify the major factors influencing the development rate of the Biofuels industry including various opportunities and gaps. A thorough analysis of the micro markets with regards to the growth trends in each category makes the overall study interesting. When studying the micro markets the researchers also dig deep into their future prospect and contribution to the Biofuels industry.

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Research Methodology
The report provides an in-depth analysis of the competitive landscape, along with company profiling of key players involved in the global Biofuels market. The authors of the report make sure to equip readers with a thorough evaluation of the vendor landscape and inform them of the current and future changes that can be expected. The competitive analysis offered in the report inspects the market share, gross margin, product portfolio, consumption, market status, and technologies of leading players controlling a significant portion of the global Biofuels market.

Knowing the trends influencing the industry performance
Stakeholders, marketing executives and business owners planning to refer a market research report can use this study to design their offerings and understand how competitors attract their potential customers and manage their supply and distribution channels. When tracking the trends researchers have made a conscious effort to analyze and interpret the consumer behaviour. Besides, the research helps product owners to understand the changes in culture, target market as well as brands so they can draw the attention of the potential customers more effectively.

Browse Full Report [email protected] https://www.marketexpertz.com/industry-overview/biofuels-market

The Biofuels market report attempts to answer the questions below:

              –    Supply chain management

–    Distribution channel

–    Top-notch companies

–    Market segmentation

–    Sale

–    Brand positioning and more

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23 May, 2021
 

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2021-2026 Biochar Market: Analysis by Business Growth, Development Factors, Applications, and …

23 May, 2021
 

Latest report on Global Biochar Market research study 2021 by InForGrowth provides the definition and specifications of the market with current as well as forthcoming features of the Market industry. It has an extensive analysis of the upcoming progress of the market. It also highlights the main drivers and restraints factors influencing the expansion of the market in every region around the world. It represents the Historical Data and market data in a transparent and detailed view. Key trends and segmentation analysis which includes type, applications, top players, and all the regions are also analyzed by our analyst. The research highlights the key developments in terms of country-wise or region-wise growth opportunities with PESTLE, SWOT, and Porter’s five forces analysis of the world’s Biochar market. 

Get the Sample Copy (Including FULL TOC, Graphs, and Tables) of this report @ https://www.inforgrowth.com/sample-request/7208512/Biochar-market

Major Players Covered in Biochar Market Report are 

This report focuses on the key global Biochar Market manufacturers to describe and analyze the sales volume, value, market share, market competition landscape, and development plans in the next few years. Major parameters covered under these company profiles include revenues, gross profits, operating income, COGS, EBITDA, sales volume, product offerings, company landscape analysis, key strategic moves, key recent developments, and technological roadmap.

Report Target Clients:

Biochar Market Report Research Methodology:

The global Biochar market prepared by research methodology which involves of secondary research, primary research, as well as expert panel review. Global Biochar market report research process begins through secondary research in which different sources are used that includes company websites, industry reports, industry publications, other publications from the government as well as trade associations, among others.

After the data gathered from secondary research, several financial modeling techniques are used to reach market estimates. After the secondary research, primary research is conducted by accompanying investigative interviews with various industry experts, important opinion leaders, and decision-makers, among others. At last, all the research findings, insights as well as estimates are prepared and present the same to the team of in-house experts.

For more Customization of Biochar Market Report reach us @ https://www.inforgrowth.com/customization/7208512/Biochar-market

Based on type, Biochar market report split into

Based on Application Biochar market is segmented into

Regional Analysis Covered in this Report are:

Scope of the Report:

All types of research weigh in on different aspects, including but not limited to specialized industry definitions, product applications, and product types. A dynamic approach to the analysis of investment feasibility, supply chain management, import and export conditions, significant return on investment, consumption volume and end-use Biochar provides greater value for general data on the market. All the elements that help business owners identify the next steps for growth are given through self-explanatory resources such as tables, charts, and graphic images.

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To Buy the Full Report, Connect with us at https://www.inforgrowth.com/purchase/7208512/Biochar-market 

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The following sorbents of xylene would be used is TCR | Chegg.com

23 May, 2021
 

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The Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Chemical Properties of Empty Fruit Bunch and Palm …

23 May, 2021
 

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Biochar is a valuable by-product which has a potential as a new soil amendment in improving soil fertility. However, the properties of biochar highly depend on the types of feedstock used and the pyrolysis condition. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the effects of pyrolysis temperature on chemical properties of biochar derived from oil palm. Two types of biochars were produced from empty fruit bunch (EFB) and palm kernel shell (PKS) by slow pyrolysis process applied at different levels of pyrolysis temperature (350, 500 and 750°C). The chemical properties of biochars such as pH, electricity conductivity (EC), total nutrients and cation exchange capacity (CEC) were determined. The adsorption capacities of cadmium on biochars also were investigated. The results showed that pH value, EC and total macronutrients for both EFB and PKS biochars increased with the increased of temperature. In contrast, CEC value decreased when pyrolysis temperature is increased. Biochar derived from EFB produced at 750°C showed the highest adsorption capacity of cadmium.

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How to make a compost cake

23 May, 2021
 

Unlike a standard compost heap, The Land Gardeners‘ compost cake is constructed all in one go. In the British climate, you should construct the cake during the growing season, i.e. during the months of April to November.

Through the winter you can still prepare ingredients and keep them until you’re ready in spring. Grass clippings, for example, can be set aside after mowing and kept until ready to assemble the cake.

Below, you’ll find all you need to know about putting one together and looking after it. The aim is to produce a ratio of 60:1 of carbon to nitrogen as this is the best way to encourage the flow of oxygen and thus microbial action.

Stick 7–10 bamboo canes into the ground in a circle, ideally 5ft in diameter. Fork around the bases of the canes to aerate the soil.

Start building the cake, initially with a carbon-rich layer 9in–10in in depth. This first layer needs to be full of structure (good ingredients include artichokes and sunflower stems).

Check for moisture after each new layer is added. The aim is for the layers to have the wetness of a wrung-out sponge — a drop or two should fall when you squeeze it in your hand.

Next, add a nitrogen layer 1½in thick and check the moisture content again.

Add a layer just over half an inch thick of powdered clay and old compost.

Repeat the layers again — carbon, then nitrogen, then clay powder — checking for moisture content after the carbon and nitrogen layers. Stop when you reach a height of 4ft.

Finish with a 6in layer of straw, mounding it up in the centre so that water runs off.

Stick a thermometer in top third of the pile so you can monitor the temperature.

The aim is for oxygen, warmth and water to reach through the heap to encourage microbial activity. At first, the heap will be damp and brownish-green to yellow in colour.

The temperature can rise swiftly — to 57˚C-60˚C — and you’ll need to keep watching the heat and adjusting it accordingly. Between 59˚C and 65˚C, weed seeds and unwanted bacteria are killed. If it gets any higher, and beneficial microbes will be destroyed.

If the cake rises above 65˚C, turn the compost to bring down the temperature. Do not worry if it does not rise above 50˚C, as heaps retain more carbon at lower temperatures.

Water the heap if it becomes too dry, but avoid soaking as this will cause it to become anaerobic.

When the temperature drops and the heap darkens to blackish-brown, the process of decomposition is well under way and the humus is being formed.

The heap is ready when the material has become crumbly and friable. Depending on the weather and other factors, this should take about six months.

Use the humus to enrich garden soil by adding a small pinch into your planting medium when potting up. Add a small amount beneath seedlings when planting them out, incorporating a small layer into your soil.

Or you can make a compost ‘tea’: adding a tablespoon of compost to a bucket of water, stirring it and pouring it over your plants as a foliar feed.

Keeping on top of the gardening jobs can be daunting, and it’s all too easy to let things slide in

Gardener, writer and broadcaster Alan Titchmarsh has been going to the Chelsea Flower Show for half a century, and should


Biochar

23 May, 2021
 

In order to read or download Biochar ebook, you need to create a FREE account.

eBook includes PDF, ePub and Kindle version

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eBook includes PDF, ePub and Kindle version

We have made it easy for you to find a PDF Ebooks without any digging. And by having access to our ebooks online or by storing it on your computer, you have convenient answers with Biochar. To get started finding Biochar, you are right to find our website which has a comprehensive collection of manuals listed.
Our library is the biggest of these that have literally hundreds of thousands of different products represented.

Finally I get this ebook, thanks for all these Biochar I can get now!

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Search – Mak IR Home – Makerere University

23 May, 2021
 

 

 


Researchers Lead £4.5m Study On Sustainable Technology To Remove CO2 From Air – Odisha …

24 May, 2021
 

The College of Nottingham is to steer the world’s largest trial to guage the viability of a fabric known as biochar to retailer carbon from the environment to counter the influence of local weather change.

The £4.5m challenge is one in all 5 UK Analysis and Innovation-funded demonstrators investigating the adoption of Greenhouse Gasoline Removing (GGR) applied sciences to chop CO2 emissions at a scale that will assist the UK attain its net-zero goal by 2050.

Work on the 4-and-a-half-year challenge started on 1 Could 2021 and area trials will probably be performed at arable and grassland websites within the Midlands and Wales, in addition to former mines, railway embankments the place engineering work has resulted in lack of vegetation, and woodlands throughout England and Wales.

Biochar is a charcoal-like substance, produced by heating natural biomass from agriculture and forestry waste within the absence of oxygen (pyrolysis) to make it carbon-rich and chemically-stable. At current, within the UK, it’s produced on a particularly small-scale in kilns and it’s primarily offered as a mulch for horticulture.

In comparison with commercial-grade charcoal we use on BBQs, biochar is comparable however, ideally, ought to be produced at larger temperatures to provide carbon that will probably be steady over lots of of years. Nevertheless, its effectiveness, price, social acceptability and limitations should be higher understood and confirmed at scale.

Scaling-up manufacturing to make renewable energy

The UK presently imports over 90 per cent of the 100,000 tonnes of charcoal used domestically, however manufacturing must be elevated to a scale of thousands and thousands of tonnes every year to make a big contribution to assist authorities web zero emission targets by 2050. Subsequently, Britain would want to spend money on a number of large-scale crops which might not solely produce the biochar, however the gases generated within the charring course of can be utilized to supply renewable warmth and energy.

As challenge lead, Professor Colin Snape, Director of the Nottingham’s EPSRC Centre of Doctoral Coaching in Carbon seize and Storage and Cleaner Fossil Vitality explains, “40 per cent of carbon goes into the biochar and 60 per cent is transformed into warmth and energy which is recovered in a large-scale plant. It’s a really energy-efficient, carbon impartial system.”

The analysis group will take a “technology-neutral” stance and consider each the carbon storage and financial efficiency of biochar as a GGR know-how to tell policy-makers with their findings.

The goal is to take carbon from atmospheric emissions and lure it within the biochar. That carbon will then be locked within the soil for hundreds of years, if not millennia, so its sustainable manufacturing could possibly be a strong software within the battle in opposition to local weather change. Nevertheless, we have to get an in depth and correct image of the longevity and stability of biochar carbon in soils to make sure it has no detrimental influence.

Guaranteeing the well being of the UK’s soil ecosystem

To evaluate how a lot biochar might be deployed within the UK with out adversely affecting the soil ecosystem, the challenge will probably be established at business scale within the largest built-in trial of its form. To facilitate the analysis, over 200 tonnes of biochar will probably be ready from virgin and recycled wooden.

Biochars will probably be examined previous to area utility on the College of Nottingham, the place Dr Will Meredith, Assistant Professor in Gasoline Science and Know-how, will analyse its traits, the steadiness of the carbon it holds and the speed it degrades over time.

Chemical evaluation will inform us how a lot of the carbon utilized as biochar is definitely locked away within the soil long-term, and the way a lot goes again into the environment as CO2. It will present how efficient large-scale biochar deployment could possibly be as a technique of greenhouse fuel removing.

Small field-plot trials will then examine the interaction between biochars (utilized at totally different charges); fertiliser, soil well being and plant and microbial responses. The applying combos and charges that elicit probably the most constructive outcomes will probably be chosen and used on the demonstrator websites to determine if responses are replicable at scale.

The researchers will probably be including the protected most of some tonnes per hectare in various settings – arable, grassland and forestry – to know the influence this soil modification might have on plant-life and the soil ecosystem.

One-hectare everlasting plots will probably be established on 10 working farms throughout the Midlands that are engaged within the challenge’s area work. On every plot, biochar will probably be utilized on half the sector with the opposite half left untouched to check any notable variations within the soil.

Biochar can even be included in soil previous to tree planting at a number of nursery woodlands and unfold on the floor in different mature forest places. Moreover, biochar will probably be used on websites the place the land is contaminated with heavy metals from prior industrial use. Biochar acts as an adsorbent, binding steel pollution to its floor, which immobilises them and, over time, reduces their toxicity.

Researchers will even add biochar on railway embankments which have misplaced vegetation to look at if this encourages regrowth and prevents soil erosion. Former open forged mines can even be investigated as potential huge carbon shops, in-filled with biochar.

Dr Helen West is an environmental biologist on the College of Nottingham who will probably be monitoring land composition at some point of the challenge. Her group will take a look at soil and microbial well being and crop yields in addition to tree progress on the area websites. They can even examine how biochar performs as a soil improver, notably as a option to improve natural carbon ranges in soil that will been depleted because of previous farming practices.

The very last thing we wish to do is have a long-lasting, detrimental impact on crop yield or soil high quality, so we are going to totally examine the influence of including carbon-rich biochar to the soil on such an enormous scale.

Partaking with a spread of stakeholders

Along with testing on their land, farmers are key stakeholders on the challenge. Their views are being captured on what makes use of and advantages they need from the biomass that would supply financial in addition to environmental returns on funding.

To maximise biochar use in agriculture, the challenge goals to guage modern ‘non-carbon’ makes use of that might elicit agronomic advantages over and above direct soil utility. These embrace stopping agricultural run-off of vitamins and pesticides that may degrade water high quality, decreasing nitrogen losses throughout composting, stopping ammonia launch from poultry farm buildings and growing methane yields throughout anaerobic digestion (AD).

If the challenge findings are constructive, the federal government might think about giving farmers monetary incentives so as to add biochar to their land. This is able to be pertinent, notably given the introduction of the brand new Environmental Land Administration scheme, which pays farmers public cash to make their enterprise extra sustainable.

Help from the Nationwide Farmers Union’s – a challenge companion – which has a imaginative and prescient to drive a inexperienced revolution on British farms, making agriculture web zero by 2040, will elevate consciousness of the potential of biochar to assist drive extra sustainable farming practices

“Along with authorities incentives, industries that wish to obtain carbon neutrality, equivalent to airways, might think about paying farmers to use biochar on their fields; in an identical option to current tree-planting initiatives to offset carbon emissions from air journey.”

A variety of different stakeholders can even be consulted inside the challenge together with agronomists and different vital advisors to land managers, farming and horticultural organisations each nationwide and native, biochar producers, environmental organisations inside civil society, and public well being, agricultural and environmental coverage makers.

Dr Carol Morris, Affiliate Professor of Rural Environmental Geography and co-investigator will lead the investigation, by interviews, workshops and doc evaluation, of how these stakeholders know and perceive the environmental dangers and alternatives of biochar, and the way this inform their views on applicable coverage interventions in relation to biochar’s potential to seize and retailer (also called sequestration) carbon.

Working in direction of web zero

To contribute to assembly the UK’s web zero greenhouse fuel emissions targets, biochar have to be demonstrated to sequester carbon on lengthy timescales (centuries or longer) and for its manufacturing to end in minimal greenhouse fuel emissions. The challenge will quantify the monetary and life cycle environmental impacts of biochar manufacturing, contemplating a spread of feedstocks of relevance to the UK, and accounting for all phases of biochar manufacturing, its use, and the permanence of carbon sequestration.

Dr Jon McKechnie, Affiliate Professor within the School of Engineering, mentioned “Waste feedstocks provide a very promising alternative, the place biochar manufacturing might keep away from present prices and environmental impacts of waste remedy processes. We have to develop a complete understanding of the prices of biochar manufacturing and its life cycle environmental impacts to establish near-term routes to deployment.”

The analysis group for the multi-disciplinary challenge, entitled Biochar Demonstrator Addressing Key Deployment Boundaries for Carbon Sequestration, includes: Nottingham, Leeds and Bangor universities, UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Forest Analysis, and the Scottish Universities Surroundings Analysis Centre. They are going to be supported by challenge companions from the agricultural sector, biochar producers and the worldwide biochar neighborhood.

Professor Sir Duncan Wingham, Govt Chair of the Pure Surroundings Analysis Council, a part of UKRI, mentioned: “Lowering greenhouse fuel emissions is a precedence for the UK, nevertheless it’s clear that alone that won’t be sufficient to cut back CO2 and meet the UK’s web zero local weather goal by 2050.

“These initiatives will examine how we are able to actively take away greenhouse gases from the environment utilizing modern applied sciences on the scale required to guard our planet. This funding is particularly vital because the UK prepares to host COP26 in Glasgow later this 12 months.”

The £31.5m programme is a part of the second wave of the Government’s Strategic Priorities Fund (SPF), which invests in top quality multi and interdisciplinary analysis.

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News – Nottingham researchers lead £4.5m study on sustainable technology to remove CO2 from …

24 May, 2021
 

The latest University news

Monday, 24 May 2021

The University of Nottingham is to lead the world’s largest trial to evaluate the viability of a material called biochar to store carbon from the atmosphere to counter the impact of climate change.

The £4.5m project is one of five UK Research and Innovation-funded demonstrators investigating the adoption of Greenhouse Gas Removal (GGR) technologies to cut CO2 emissions at a scale that may help the UK reach its net-zero target by 2050.

Work on the 4-and-a-half-year project began on 1 May 2021 and field trials will be conducted at arable and grassland sites in the Midlands and Wales, as well as former mines, railway embankments where engineering work has resulted in loss of vegetation, and woodlands across England and Wales.

Biochar is a charcoal-like substance, produced by heating organic biomass from agriculture and forestry waste in the absence of oxygen (pyrolysis) to make it carbon-rich and chemically-stable. At present, in the UK, it is produced on an extremely small-scale in kilns and it is mainly sold as a mulch for horticulture.

Compared to commercial-grade charcoal we use on BBQs, biochar is similar but, ideally, should be produced at higher temperatures to produce carbon that will be stable over hundreds of years. However, its effectiveness, cost, social acceptability and limitations need to be better understood and proven at scale.

Scaling-up production to make renewable power

The UK currently imports over 90 per cent of the 100,000 tonnes of charcoal used domestically, but production needs to be increased to a scale of millions of tonnes per annum to make a significant contribution to support government net zero emission targets by 2050. Therefore, Britain would need to invest in multiple large-scale plants which would not only produce the biochar, but the gases generated in the charring process can be used to provide renewable heat and power.

As project lead, Professor Colin Snape, Director of the Nottingham’s EPSRC Centre of Doctoral Training in Carbon capture and Storage and Cleaner Fossil Energy explains, “40 per cent of carbon goes into the biochar and 60 per cent is converted into heat and power which is recovered in a large-scale plant. It’s a very energy-efficient, carbon neutral system.”

The research team will take a “technology-neutral” stance and evaluate both the carbon storage and economic performance of biochar as a GGR technology to inform policy-makers with their findings.

The aim is to take carbon from atmospheric emissions and trap it in the biochar. That carbon will then be locked in the soil for centuries, if not millennia, so its sustainable production could be a powerful tool in the fight against climate change. However, we need to get a detailed and accurate picture of the longevity and stability of biochar carbon in soils to ensure it has no detrimental impact.

Ensuring the health of the UK’s soil ecosystem

To assess how much biochar can be deployed in the UK without adversely affecting the soil ecosystem, the project will be established at commercial scale in the largest integrated trial of its kind. To facilitate the research, over 200 tonnes of biochar will be prepared from virgin and recycled wood.

Biochars will be tested prior to field application at the University of Nottingham, where Dr Will Meredith, Assistant Professor in Fuel Science and Technology, will analyse its characteristics, the stability of the carbon it holds and the rate it degrades over time.

Chemical analysis will tell us how much of the carbon applied as biochar is actually locked away in the soil long-term, and how much goes back into the atmosphere as CO2. This will show how effective large-scale biochar deployment could be as a method of greenhouse gas removal.

Small field-plot trials will then investigate the interplay between biochars (applied at different rates); fertiliser, soil health and plant and microbial responses. The application combinations and rates that elicit the most positive results will be selected and used at the demonstrator sites to ascertain if responses are replicable at scale.

The researchers will be adding the safe maximum of a few tonnes per hectare in a number of settings – arable, grassland and forestry – to understand the impact this soil amendment may have on plant-life and the soil ecosystem.

One-hectare permanent plots will be established on 10 working farms across the Midlands which are engaged in the project’s field work. On each plot, biochar will be applied on half the field with the other half left untouched to study any notable variations in the soil.

Biochar will also be incorporated in soil prior to tree planting at several nursery woodlands and spread on the surface in other mature forest locations. Additionally, biochar will be used on sites where the land is contaminated with heavy metals from prior industrial use. Biochar acts as an adsorbent, binding metal pollutants to its surface, which immobilises them and, over time, reduces their toxicity.

Researchers will even add biochar on railway embankments that have lost vegetation to examine if this encourages regrowth and prevents soil erosion. Former open cast mines will also be investigated as potential vast carbon stores, in-filled with biochar.

Dr Helen West is an environmental biologist at the University of Nottingham who will be monitoring land composition for the duration of the project. Her team will test soil and microbial health and crop yields as well as tree growth at the field sites. They will also investigate how biochar performs as a soil improver, particularly as a way to enhance organic carbon levels in soil that may been depleted due to past farming practices.

The last thing we want to do is have a lasting, detrimental effect on crop yield or soil quality, so we will thoroughly investigate the impact of adding carbon-rich biochar to the soil on such a vast scale.

Engaging with a range of stakeholders

In addition to testing on their land, farmers are key stakeholders on the project. Their views are being captured on what uses and benefits they want from the biomass that would provide economic as well as environmental returns on investment.

To maximise biochar use in agriculture, the project aims to evaluate innovative ‘non-carbon’ uses that would elicit agronomic benefits over and above direct soil application. These include preventing agricultural run-off of nutrients and pesticides that can degrade water quality, reducing nitrogen losses during composting, preventing ammonia release from poultry farm buildings and increasing methane yields during anaerobic digestion (AD).

If the project findings are positive, the government may consider giving farmers financial incentives to add biochar to their land. This would be pertinent, particularly given the introduction of the new Environmental Land Management scheme, which pays farmers public money to make their business more sustainable.

Support from the National Farmers Union’s – a project partner – which has a vision to drive a green revolution on British farms, making agriculture net zero by 2040, will raise awareness of the potential of biochar to help drive more sustainable farming practices

“In addition to government incentives, industries that want to achieve carbon neutrality, such as airlines, may consider paying farmers to apply biochar on their fields; in a similar way to existing tree-planting initiatives to offset carbon emissions from air travel.”

A wide range of other stakeholders will also be consulted within the project including agronomists and other significant advisors to land managers, farming and horticultural organisations both national and local, biochar producers, environmental organisations within civil society, and public health, agricultural and environmental policy makers.

Dr Carol Morris, Associate Professor of Rural Environmental Geography and co-investigator will lead the investigation, through interviews, workshops and document analysis, of how these stakeholders know and understand the environmental risks and opportunities of biochar, and how this inform their perspectives on appropriate policy interventions in relation to biochar’s ability to capture and store (also known as sequestration) carbon.

Working towards net zero

To contribute to meeting the UK’s net zero greenhouse gas emissions targets, biochar must be demonstrated to sequester carbon on long timescales (centuries or longer) and for its production to result in minimal greenhouse gas emissions. The project will quantify the financial and life cycle environmental impacts of biochar production, considering a range of feedstocks of relevance to the UK, and accounting for all stages of biochar production, its use, and the permanence of carbon sequestration.

Dr Jon McKechnie, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Engineering, said “Waste feedstocks offer a particularly promising opportunity, where biochar production may avoid current costs and environmental impacts of waste treatment processes. We need to develop a comprehensive understanding of the costs of biochar production and its life cycle environmental impacts to identify near-term routes to deployment.”

The research team for the multi-disciplinary project, entitled Biochar Demonstrator Addressing Key Deployment Barriers for Carbon Sequestration, comprises: Nottingham, Leeds and Bangor universities, UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Forest Research, and the Scottish Universities Environment Research Centre. They will be supported by project partners from the agricultural sector, biochar producers and the international biochar community.

Professor Sir Duncan Wingham, Executive Chair of the Natural Environment Research Council, part of UKRI, said: “Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a priority for the UK, but it’s clear that alone that will not be enough to reduce CO2 and meet the UK’s net zero climate target by 2050.

“These projects will investigate how we can actively remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere using innovative technologies at the scale required to protect our planet. This investment is especially significant as the UK prepares to host COP26 in Glasgow later this year.”

The £31.5m programme is part of the second wave of the Government’s Strategic Priorities Fund (SPF), which invests in high quality multi and interdisciplinary research.

More information is available from Professor Colin Snape at colin.snape@nottingham.ac.uk or 0115 95 14166

Our academics can now be interviewed for broadcast via our Media Hub, which offers a Globelynx fixed camera and ISDN line facilities at University Park campus. For further information please contact a member of the Communications team on +44 (0)115 951 5798, email  pressoffice@nottingham.ac.uk or see the Globelynx website for how to register for this service.

For up to the minute media alerts, follow us on Twitter

Notes to editors:

The University of Nottingham is a research-intensive university with a proud heritage, consistently ranked among the world’s top 100. Studying at the University of Nottingham is a life-changing experience and we pride ourselves on unlocking the potential of our students. We have a pioneering spirit, expressed in the vision of our founder Sir Jesse Boot, which has seen us lead the way in establishing campuses in China and Malaysia – part of a globally connected network of education, research and industrial engagement. The University’s state-of-the-art facilities and inclusive and disability sport provision is reflected in its status as The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2021 Sports University of the Year. We are ranked eighth for research power in the UK according to REF 2014. We have six beacons of research excellence helping to transform lives and change the world; we are also a major employer and industry partner – locally and globally. Alongside Nottingham Trent University, we lead the Universities for Nottingham initiative, a pioneering collaboration which brings together the combined strength and civic missions of Nottingham’s two world-class universities and is working with local communities and partners to aid recovery and renewal following the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Researchers lead £4.5m study on sustainable technology to remove CO2 from air

24 May, 2021
 

The University of Nottingham is to lead the world’s largest trial to evaluate the viability of a material called biochar to store carbon from the atmosphere to counter the impact of climate change.

The £4.5m project is one of five UK Research and Innovation-funded demonstrators investigating the adoption of Greenhouse Gas Removal (GGR) technologies to cut CO2 emissions at a scale that may help the UK reach its net-zero target by 2050.

Work on the 4-and-a-half-year project began on 1 May 2021 and field trials will be conducted at arable and grassland sites in the Midlands and Wales, as well as former mines, railway embankments where engineering work has resulted in loss of vegetation, and woodlands across England and Wales.

Biochar is a charcoal-like substance, produced by heating organic biomass from agriculture and forestry waste in the absence of oxygen (pyrolysis) to make it carbon-rich and chemically-stable. At present, in the UK, it is produced on an extremely small-scale in kilns and it is mainly sold as a mulch for horticulture.

Compared to commercial-grade charcoal we use on BBQs, biochar is similar but, ideally, should be produced at higher temperatures to produce carbon that will be stable over hundreds of years. However, its effectiveness, cost, social acceptability and limitations need to be better understood and proven at scale.

Scaling-up production to make renewable power

The UK currently imports over 90 per cent of the 100,000 tonnes of charcoal used domestically, but production needs to be increased to a scale of millions of tonnes per annum to make a significant contribution to support government net zero emission targets by 2050. Therefore, Britain would need to invest in multiple large-scale plants which would not only produce the biochar, but the gases generated in the charring process can be used to provide renewable heat and power.

As project lead, Professor Colin Snape, Director of the Nottingham’s EPSRC Centre of Doctoral Training in Carbon capture and Storage and Cleaner Fossil Energy explains, “40 per cent of carbon goes into the biochar and 60 per cent is converted into heat and power which is recovered in a large-scale plant. It’s a very energy-efficient, carbon neutral system.”

The research team will take a “technology-neutral” stance and evaluate both the carbon storage and economic performance of biochar as a GGR technology to inform policy-makers with their findings.

The aim is to take carbon from atmospheric emissions and trap it in the biochar. That carbon will then be locked in the soil for centuries, if not millennia, so its sustainable production could be a powerful tool in the fight against climate change. However, we need to get a detailed and accurate picture of the longevity and stability of biochar carbon in soils to ensure it has no detrimental impact.

Ensuring the health of the UK’s soil ecosystem

To assess how much biochar can be deployed in the UK without adversely affecting the soil ecosystem, the project will be established at commercial scale in the largest integrated trial of its kind. To facilitate the research, over 200 tonnes of biochar will be prepared from virgin and recycled wood.

Biochars will be tested prior to field application at the University of Nottingham, where Dr Will Meredith, Assistant Professor in Fuel Science and Technology, will analyse its characteristics, the stability of the carbon it holds and the rate it degrades over time.

Chemical analysis will tell us how much of the carbon applied as biochar is actually locked away in the soil long-term, and how much goes back into the atmosphere as CO2. This will show how effective large-scale biochar deployment could be as a method of greenhouse gas removal.

Small field-plot trials will then investigate the interplay between biochars (applied at different rates); fertiliser, soil health and plant and microbial responses. The application combinations and rates that elicit the most positive results will be selected and used at the demonstrator sites to ascertain if responses are replicable at scale.

The researchers will be adding the safe maximum of a few tonnes per hectare in a number of settings – arable, grassland and forestry – to understand the impact this soil amendment may have on plant-life and the soil ecosystem.

One-hectare permanent plots will be established on 10 working farms across the Midlands which are engaged in the project’s field work. On each plot, biochar will be applied on half the field with the other half left untouched to study any notable variations in the soil.

Biochar will also be incorporated in soil prior to tree planting at several nursery woodlands and spread on the surface in other mature forest locations. Additionally, biochar will be used on sites where the land is contaminated with heavy metals from prior industrial use. Biochar acts as an adsorbent, binding metal pollutants to its surface, which immobilises them and, over time, reduces their toxicity.

Researchers will even add biochar on railway embankments that have lost vegetation to examine if this encourages regrowth and prevents soil erosion. Former open cast mines will also be investigated as potential vast carbon stores, in-filled with biochar.

Dr Helen West is an environmental biologist at the University of Nottingham who will be monitoring land composition for the duration of the project. Her team will test soil and microbial health and crop yields as well as tree growth at the field sites. They will also investigate how biochar performs as a soil improver, particularly as a way to enhance organic carbon levels in soil that may been depleted due to past farming practices.

The last thing we want to do is have a lasting, detrimental effect on crop yield or soil quality, so we will thoroughly investigate the impact of adding carbon-rich biochar to the soil on such a vast scale.

Engaging with a range of stakeholders

In addition to testing on their land, farmers are key stakeholders on the project. Their views are being captured on what uses and benefits they want from the biomass that would provide economic as well as environmental returns on investment.

To maximise biochar use in agriculture, the project aims to evaluate innovative ‘non-carbon’ uses that would elicit agronomic benefits over and above direct soil application. These include preventing agricultural run-off of nutrients and pesticides that can degrade water quality, reducing nitrogen losses during composting, preventing ammonia release from poultry farm buildings and increasing methane yields during anaerobic digestion (AD).

If the project findings are positive, the government may consider giving farmers financial incentives to add biochar to their land. This would be pertinent, particularly given the introduction of the new Environmental Land Management scheme, which pays farmers public money to make their business more sustainable.

Support from the National Farmers Union’s – a project partner – which has a vision to drive a green revolution on British farms, making agriculture net zero by 2040, will raise awareness of the potential of biochar to help drive more sustainable farming practices

“In addition to government incentives, industries that want to achieve carbon neutrality, such as airlines, may consider paying farmers to apply biochar on their fields; in a similar way to existing tree-planting initiatives to offset carbon emissions from air travel.”

A wide range of other stakeholders will also be consulted within the project including agronomists and other significant advisors to land managers, farming and horticultural organisations both national and local, biochar producers, environmental organisations within civil society, and public health, agricultural and environmental policy makers.

Dr Carol Morris, Associate Professor of Rural Environmental Geography and co-investigator will lead the investigation, through interviews, workshops and document analysis, of how these stakeholders know and understand the environmental risks and opportunities of biochar, and how this inform their perspectives on appropriate policy interventions in relation to biochar’s ability to capture and store (also known as sequestration) carbon.

Working towards net zero

To contribute to meeting the UK’s net zero greenhouse gas emissions targets, biochar must be demonstrated to sequester carbon on long timescales (centuries or longer) and for its production to result in minimal greenhouse gas emissions. The project will quantify the financial and life cycle environmental impacts of biochar production, considering a range of feedstocks of relevance to the UK, and accounting for all stages of biochar production, its use, and the permanence of carbon sequestration.

Dr Jon McKechnie, Associate Professor in the Faculty of Engineering, said “Waste feedstocks offer a particularly promising opportunity, where biochar production may avoid current costs and environmental impacts of waste treatment processes. We need to develop a comprehensive understanding of the costs of biochar production and its life cycle environmental impacts to identify near-term routes to deployment.”

The research team for the multi-disciplinary project, entitled Biochar Demonstrator Addressing Key Deployment Barriers for Carbon Sequestration, comprises: Nottingham, Leeds and Bangor universities, UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Forest Research, and the Scottish Universities Environment Research Centre. They will be supported by project partners from the agricultural sector, biochar producers and the international biochar community.

Professor Sir Duncan Wingham, Executive Chair of the Natural Environment Research Council, part of UKRI, said: “Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a priority for the UK, but it’s clear that alone that will not be enough to reduce CO2 and meet the UK’s net zero climate target by 2050.

“These projects will investigate how we can actively remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere using innovative technologies at the scale required to protect our planet. This investment is especially significant as the UK prepares to host COP26 in Glasgow later this year.”

The £31.5m programme is part of the second wave of the Government’s Strategic Priorities Fund (SPF), which invests in high quality multi and interdisciplinary research.


Biochar Mitigates N2O Emission of Microbial Denitrification through Modulating Carbon …

24 May, 2021
 

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Green synthesis of ZnO coated hybrid biochar for the synchronous removal of ciprofloxacin and …

24 May, 2021
 

Preparation of biochar from kaolinite and coconut husk (KCB) and further activated with HCl (KCB-A) and KOH (KCB-B) via a microwave technique for the remediation of ciprofloxacin (CIP) and tetracycline (TET) from water was carried out. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction showed the successful synthesis of functionalized biochars. Batch adsorption experiments demonstrated the potential of the adsorbents for fast and efficient removal of CIP and TET from solution. The adsorption capacities were found to be 71, 140 and 229 mg g−1 for CIP and 118, 117 and 232 mg g−1 for TET removal on KCB, KCB-A and KCB-B, respectively. For KCB, KCB-B and KCB-B, CIP adsorption best followed the pseudo second order kinetic model (PSOM), pseudo first order kinetic model (PFOM) and intraparticle diffusion (IDP) respectively. TET adsorption followed PSOM for KCB, IPD for KCB-B and PFOM for KCB-A. CIP adsorption on KCB, KCB-A and KCB-B best fit the Temkin, Langmuir and Brouers–Sotolongo isotherms, respectively, and TET adsorption on KCB best fit Brouers–Sotolongo while KCB-A and KCB-B best fit Langmuir–Freundlich. Adsorption of both contaminants was thermodynamically feasible showing that these materials are excellent adsorbents for the treatment of pharmaceuticals in water.

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Huge £30m greenhouse gas removal trial begins in UK

24 May, 2021
 

Spreading rock chips, rewetting peatlands and examining the CO2-removing potential of grass species are among the techniques being backed by the government

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Research teams across the UK are set to begin work on various projects to suck greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere, as part of a £30m government-funded trial.

The aim of the 4.5-year-long project is to help the UK reach its legally-binding net-zero greenhouse gas targets by 2050, which it is thought can not be reached through cutting emissions alone.

The techniques which are being tested include using peat, biochar – a charcoal-like substance, tree and grass planting, and crumbling silicate rocks, all to draw CO2 out of the air.

The trials will assess the effectiveness of the methods, and the extent to which they can be scaled up to sequester significant amounts of carbon.

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), the government body funding the research, said the CO2 removal methods were only designed to complement existing efforts to cut greenhouse gases – particularly in areas which are currently difficult to decarbonise completely, including heavy industry, the aviation sector and agriculture.

Professor Cameron Hepburn from the University of Oxford is co-ordinating the research.

He said: “GHG removal is essential to achieve net-zero carbon emissions and stabilise the climate.

“Alongside the need for much faster emissions reductions now, we also need to start pulling CO2 out of the atmosphere.

“GHG removal is not only essential, it also has the potential to become big business. As we rebuild societies and economies following Covid-19, we have an opportunity to orient ourselves towards the green jobs and industries of the future.”

The project will be carried out on over 100 acres of land, making it one of the largest research works of this kind in the world.

UKRI said the programme will also engage with businesses and people in order to assess and promote the techniques’ progression and readiness for market to ensure they are viable.

The “enhanced rock weathering” technique will investigate amending soils on farmland with crushed calcium and magnesium rich silicate rocks, a process which can help accelerate natural CO2 sequestration, and as it improves the soil has the potential to enhance UK food security.

The accelerated peatland formation technique will re-wet existing peatlands and attempt to recreate and enhance the environmental conditions that lead to peat formation.

Currently peatlands store more carbon than any other terrestrial ecosystem. However, as a result of human disturbance, they are rapidly losing this carbon to the atmosphere.

Another of the methods – producing and depositing biochar, which is similar to charcoal and is produced from heating biomass in the absence of oxygen (pyrolysis) – will see trials in which it is buried at disused mines, in railway cuttings and forestry sites in England and Wales.

Meanwhile, other research teams will look at the UK’s tree planting efforts, including identifying land which could be turned into woodland, and examining the carbon-removing potential of growing miscanthus grasses and short rotation coppice willow, a woody fast-growing tree species usually cultivated to produce high biomass yields in a short period of time.

Professor Sir Duncan Wingham, the executive chair of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), part of UKRI, said: “Reducing GHG emissions is a priority for the UK, but it’s clear that alone that will not be enough to reduce CO2 and meet the UK’s net-zero climate target by 2050.

“These projects will investigate how we can actively remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere using innovative technologies at the scale required to protect our planet.”

He added: “This investment by UKRI is especially significant as the UK prepares to host COP26 in Glasgow later this year.”

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CapChar Ltd launches project with Biochar Project Services and UK Hardwoods Ltd to investigate …

24 May, 2021
 

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One-pot pyrolysis of metal-embedded biochar derived from invasive plant for efficient Cr(VI …

24 May, 2021
 

Metal-embedded invasive plant derived biochar through one-step pyrolysis.

Fe-BC was the most effective in the removal of Cr(VI) among metal-embedded biochar.

Highly pH-dependent was presented in Cr(VI) removal by all prepared biochar

Cr(VI) was removed via electrostatic attraction, complexation and redox reaction.

Metal-embedded invasive plant derived biochar through one-step pyrolysis.

Fe-BC was the most effective in the removal of Cr(VI) among metal-embedded biochar.

Highly pH-dependent was presented in Cr(VI) removal by all prepared biochar

Cr(VI) was removed via electrostatic attraction, complexation and redox reaction.

In this work, metal-embedded Eichhornia crassipes derived biochar (BC, Fe-BC, Al-BC, NH-BC) was synthesized through one-step pyrolysis to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. The effects of initial pH, adsorption kinetics, adsorption isotherms and competitive experiments were measured. SEM, XRD, FTIR showed that metals successfully embedded BCs. Raman indicated metal-embedded BCs are characterized by a greater extent of the disorder in aromatic ring structure than original BCs. The Cr(VI) removal was dependent on pH. The maximum adsorption capacity of Fe-BC500 was 47.72 mg/g under pH value of 2.0. In additions, the adsorption of Cr(VI) followed the Pseudo First Order kinetics and the Langmuir model, demonstrating that the adsorption process was controlled by chemical and monolayer adsorption. The intraparticle diffusion models showed adsorption was affected by many factors. In the Cr(VI) competitive system, Cu(II) and citric acid are favorable for Cr(VI) removal, while phosphate anion retarded Cr(VI) removal. Electrochemical analysis revealed that Fe-BC500 exhibited the lowest electrical resistance and the fastest electron transfer rate. The Cr(VI) removal mechanism on metal-embedded BCs included electrostatic attraction, surface complexation and redox reaction. Therefore, metal-embedded invasive plant derived biochar are of great significance to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

co-corresponding authors in this work


What are the Future Growth Prospects for Oil Mist Collector Market? | Detailed Insights and …

24 May, 2021
 

Oil Mist Collector Market Study Provides Latest Intelligence on Growth in 2021 and Beyond

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The latest study on Oil Mist Collector market offers in-depth analysis and insights for the forecast period 2021-2031. The study tracks Oil Mist Collector sales and adoption in over 20 countries, with analysis high-growth as well as emerging markets. The Global Oil Mist Collector Market research report also offer COVID-19 analysis on sales, providing readers with latest analysis.

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On the basis of installation, the global oil mist collector market can be segmented as:

On the basis of end user/application, the global oil mist collector market can be segmented as:

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Government funding for greenhouse gas removal projects

24 May, 2021
 

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The Government funding will go to research teams from universities across the UK, coordinated by University of Oxford experts.

It signals the Government’s biggest research programme to understand greenhouse gas removal (GGR) techniques.

Unlike techniques to reduce emissions at source, GGR aims to capture and remove greenhouse gases already in the air.

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The Oxford hub for the funding, CO2RE, will lead the programme.

Cameron Hepburn, director of the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment, said: “Greenhouse gas removal is essential to achieve net zero carbon emissions and stabilise the climate.

“Alongside the need for much faster emissions reductions now, we also need to start pulling carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.

“Greenhouse gas removal is not only essential, it also has the potential to become big business.

“As we rebuild societies and economies following Covid-19, we have an opportunity to orient ourselves towards the green jobs and industries of the future.”

Read more: University celebrates 100 years of admitting female students

A dozen universities will benefit from the funding, which will last for nearly five years.

The programme consists of five GGR projects across the country, with work beginning this month.

Projects include large-scale tree planting, peatland restoration and the use of biochar.

Patrick Grant, pro vice-chancellor for research at Oxford, said: “Crucially CO2RE will provide policy design options and business models to ensure GGR technologies are developed within a viable economic and political landscape.”

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Bartlett Trees' Glynn Percival identifies new approaches to tree health on Roots and All podcast

24 May, 2021
 

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Biochar a sustainable solution for wastewater treatment: Current status and perspectives …

24 May, 2021
 

The textile, printing, tanning, pharmaceutical, and food industries are the main sources of dye-containing wastewater and disposal of industrial effluent and organic contaminants without any treatment polluting the environment. Synthetic dyes have found wide application in manufacturing industries because of their easy accessibility at low price, stability, and availability of different colors compared to natural dye. The deterioration of water quality due to the presence of synthetic dyes and other contaminants poses a serious threat to ecosystem and human health. Biochar, a low-cost carbonaceous material, is emerging as an economical substitute to the activated carbon for the removal of various organic contaminants such as agrochemicals, antibiotics, polychlorinated biphenyls, and aromatic dyes. Biochar can be obtained from the thermochemical conversion of waste biomass in an oxygen-limited condition. Biochar has several unique properties such as large surface area, high porosity, the presence of functional groups and charges on the surface of biochar, which make it an efficient, cost-effective and eco-friendly material for the removal of contaminants. The present chapter highlights the role of biochar in different environmental applications such as recycling of agricultural waste, soil fertility improvement, carbon sequestration, pollution remediation, wastewater treatment, etc.


Global Biochar Market Estimation 2021-2026 Analysis by Key Players like Cool Planet, Pacific …

24 May, 2021
 

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Climate smart innovations in agriculture in Uganda: Improved food security, livelihoods and soil …

24 May, 2021
 

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Exploiting bioresources for environmental friendly strawberry production with enhanced yield …

25 May, 2021
 

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DEN Sustainable Soils

25 May, 2021
 

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Sequestering Carbon With Biochar – Interview With CEO Of Carbo Culture, Henrietta Moon The …

25 May, 2021
 

In episode 15 of The Detechtor Podcast, Scott Hickman is talking to Henrietta Moon, CEO of Carbo Culture, a Finnish startup that sequesters carbon for thousands of years thanks to biochar. Learn about biochar, and Carbo Culture’s mission of sequestering a gigaton of CO2 by 2030!

📰 Learn More About Biochar: https://thedetechtor.com/carbo-culture-biochar-carbon-sequestration/

🌐 Check Out Carbo Culture: https://www.carboculture.com/

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Biochar Market Outlook, Growth Prospects, Competitive Analysis, Upcoming Trend and Forecast …

25 May, 2021
 

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The “Global Biochar Market Analysis to 2028” is a specialized and in-depth study of the Chemicals & Materials industry with a special focus on the global market trend analysis. The report aims to provide an overview of the biochar market with detailed market segmentation by type, technology, application, and geography. The report provides key statistics on the market status of the leading biochar market players and offers key trends and opportunities in the market.

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Biochar + Humic Acid : lawncare

25 May, 2021
 


East Millinocket biochar production plant gets $800K boost from FAME

25 May, 2021
 

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The Finance Authority of Maine has approved an $800,000 FAME Direct Loan to Standard Biocarbon Corp., and the money will help fund equipment for the company’s biochar operation at the former East Millinocket mill site.

SBC, the anchor tenant of the new town-owned innovation campus, will use the loan to buy two kilns that will be used to produce biochar, which is a granular carbon substance produced when organic matter is decomposed thermally in an oxygen-starved chamber, a process called pyrolysis.

SBC signed a letter of intent in February with the East Millinocket Industrial Inc. board of directors to locate at the developing innovation and industrial park at the former Great Northern Paper site. The company will initially create eight jobs, with more possible in the future, FAME said in a news release about the financing. The board oversees the mill site, which is owned by the town.

The total project cost is $5.6 million, and FAME’s contribution to the overall project will be 14%. Financing also includes a $2 million loan from Coastal Enterprises Inc., of which $800,000 will be financed by FAME and $400,000 will come from from the Maine Technology Institute. CEI will retain $800,000 and be lead lender.

SBC will begin manufacturing biochar this fall, after the pyrolactic kilns, which will be imported from Germany, are installed. The company will stockpile and source feedstock across the Penobscot Valley with local suppliers. Kilns will be added with increasing demand.

“Solid early support from the Maine investment community, state, county and East Millinocket officials, and the Maine forest products industry, has been incredibly helpful in launching this business,” said Fred Horton, SBC cofounder, president and CEO.

“This investment supports the creation of an entirely new forest products industry in Maine, harnessing the existing underutilized infrastructure of our vast working forests to manufacture a product with rapidly growing and nearly unlimited potential demand.

“Trees are very efficient at taking carbon from the air, but they return it all when they die and decompose or are burned,” Horton said. “Our product does not break down in nature, keeping carbon out of the atmosphere for millennia while offering myriad other environmental benefits from soil enhancement to water purification, animal feed and other uses.”

David Daigler, FAME board chair, said, “FAME is pleased to support this project, which promotes utilization of Maine’s natural resources, adding value to produce biochar. It also will help to reduce Maine’s carbon footprint.”

Daigler said that the unemployment rate in the Millinocket region is nearly three times higher than the rest of the state, and the new production plant will help to create jobs in advanced technology in the region. He said it will also supports indirect jobs in construction, transportation and the wood products industry.

SBC’s vision is to be the largest biochar producer in North America, according to the release. The charcoal-like byproduct is highly porous and safe for the environment. The material is already used in Europe, and has become a fast-growing industry in the U.S. The commodity’s applications include agriculture, remediation, advanced polymer science, construction and building materials, odor control and animal feed additives.

Biochar also uses the process of carbonization as a climate protection tool. The production process of biochar sequesters carbon. Carbon sequestration is the process of capturing and storing atmospheric carbon dioxide and is one method of helping to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

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Waste eggshell membrane-templated synthesis of functional Cu2+–Cu+/biochar for an …

25 May, 2021
 

A fast and sensitive test of blood glucose levels is very important for monitoring and reducing diabetic complications. Herein, a simple and sensitive non-enzymatic glucose sensing platform was fabricated by employing Cu2+–Cu+/biochar as the catalyst. The Cu2+–Cu+/biochar was synthesized through a bio-inspired synthesis, in which waste eggshell membrane (ESM) was introduced as a template to absorb Cu2+, then converting it into Cu2+–Cu+ biochar via a rapid pyrolysis. The structure and properties of the as-prepared Cu2+–Cu+ biochar were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FT-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Due to great advantages of Cu2+–Cu+/biochar, such as high electrical conductivity, unique three-dimensional porous network and large electrochemically active surface area, the as-prepared Cu2+–Cu+ biochar modified electrode showed high catalytic activity towards glucose oxidization. The fabricated enzyme-free glucose sensor showed excellent performance for glucose determination with a linear range of 12.5–670 μM, and a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.04 μM. Moreover, the as-fabricated sensor has good anti-interference ability and stability. Finally, the proposed senor has been successfully applied to detect glucose in clinical samples (human serum). Owing to the green synthesis method, using biowaste ESM as a template, and the superior catalytic performance and low cost of Cu2+–Cu+/biochar, the developed sensor shows great potential in clinical applications for direct sensing of glucose.

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Agriculture | Free Full-Text | Production of Biochar from Vine Pruning: Waste Recovery in the Wine …

25 May, 2021
 

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Figure 1

Nunes, L.J.R.; Rodrigues, A.M.; Matias, J.C.O.; Ferraz, A.I.; Rodrigues, A.C. Production of Biochar from Vine Pruning: Waste Recovery in the Wine Industry. Agriculture 2021, 11, 489. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11060489

Nunes LJR, Rodrigues AM, Matias JCO, Ferraz AI, Rodrigues AC. Production of Biochar from Vine Pruning: Waste Recovery in the Wine Industry. Agriculture. 2021; 11(6):489. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11060489

Nunes, Leonel J.R.; Rodrigues, Abel M.; Matias, João C.O.; Ferraz, Ana I.; Rodrigues, Ana C. 2021. “Production of Biochar from Vine Pruning: Waste Recovery in the Wine Industry” Agriculture 11, no. 6: 489. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11060489

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Business Joensuu's tweet – "A new, diverse, and highly researched business can be created …

25 May, 2021
 


Sequestering Carbon With Biochar – Interview With CEO of Carbo Culture, Henrietta Moon by The …

25 May, 2021
 


University led study to evaluate the sustainable removal of CO2 from the air – Machinery Market News

25 May, 2021
 

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BEIS gives funding for carbon projects

25 May, 2021
 

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has announced that it is looking to support the deployment of advanced carbon, capture, usage and storage (CCUS) technologies within the UK. It has also released a list of projects for which funding support has been allocated.

The BEIS expenditure comes in wake of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Ten point plan for a green industrial revolution, which was announced in November 2020.

Funding support announced yesterday (24 May) is for projects primarily involving waste wood and biowaste and carbon capture. The announcement is HERE.

It includes support for work at:

Bioenergy Infrastructure Group (BIG) and Peel NRE, part of Peel L&P, have secured £250,000 from the BEIS Net Zero Innovation Portfolio for the Ince Bioenergy Carbon Capture and Storage project known as ‘InBECCS’.

The Phase 1 project aims to develop and design a 20 tonnes per day CO2 capture demonstration plant at the heart of the North West industrial cluster, “underpinned by C-Capture technology and a 28.5MWe biomass gasification unit”. Future phasing is to deliver the first operational BECCS plant in the North West of England, the first instance of integrated BECCS-gasification in the UK, the next “innovative stride in C-Capture’s technology” and ultimately accelerate the adoption of BECCS-based carbon negative power.

The project is being delivered via a collaboration between Peel NRE and Bioenergy Infrastructure Group at their biomass facility located at Protos, Peel L&P’s energy and resource hub in Cheshire.

This funding allocation is to support “Carbon Negative Community Energy” and is led by Severn Wye Energy Agency alongside Pure Leapfrog and industrial partner PyroCore.

Pyrolysis technology will be developed to incorporate enhanced carbon capture capacity, and to produce a range of marketable outputs, including biochar for carbon sequestration, carbon products for construction, and heat for a local district heating network. The project team say this enables improved management of local woodland and forestry by putting local waste wood to use, ultimately growing the local supply chain and improving the natural environment.

This project involves the use of hydrothermal carbonisation and post-carbonisation.

It is led by the University of Nottingham alongside its industrial partners CPL Industries and Severn Trent Green Power. The team say that the expansion of anaerobic digestion, including food waste, indicates there is potential to produce ca. 0.5 Mt p.a. of biochar from biowastes by 2030. “Since hydrothermal carbonisation (HTC) operates at 200oC, subsequent carbonisation of the resultant biocoal is required to produce stable biochar containing low proportions of potentially degradable carbon.”

Initial analysis has indicated that carbon sequestration costs are below (£100 t/CO2 avoided). The team say: “The aim is to establish the feasibility of this approach and optimise process design and operation. A digestate residue supplied by Severn Trent Green Power will be treated by HTC in the pilot plant at CPL. Up to 10 tonnes of the resultant HTC biocoal will then be treated in a pilot-plant to establish the quality of the biochar for sequestration that can be obtained by post-carbonisation, enabling design options to be considered for producing over 600 tonnes of biochar p.a. (2000 tonnes CO2 equivalent) in the next development phase to achieve deployment by 2030.”

More information about the funds available and the type of projects the government is supporting can be found at the BEIS web page about The CCUS Innovation 2.0 competition. This is part of the £1 billion Net Zero Innovation Portfolio (NZIP).

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BIOCHAR FOR LAWN humichar for lawns

25 May, 2021
 

26-05-2021


Organic Coffee Market Size, Share, Growth, Industry Analysis, Opportunities and Forecast 2019-2026

25 May, 2021
 

According to a new report published by Allied Market Research, titled, Organic Coffee Market by Type, Packaging Type and Sales Channel: Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2019–2026,” the global organic coffee market size was $6.8 billion in 2018, and is projected to reach $12.6 billion by 2026, registering a CAGR of 8.2% from 2019 to 2026.

Organic coffee is widely accepted as environmentally friendly product. Organic farming minimizes the utilization of synthetic and artificial additives added to the soil. For organic farming compost mulch and natural fertilizers are used in place of artificial fertilizers. Moreover, conventional methods used for farming have been replaced by new and advanced eco-friendly techniques. This improves production efficiency and produces high quality organic coffee. In addition, advanced farming technologies minimize the production time and manpower. For instance, Bio-char based organic soil amendment technology (BIOSAT), a soil additive made of mixture of bio-char and various organic nutrients, improves soil fertility, maintains soil strength, increases crop production, and minimizes dependency on artificial fertilizers. Hence, improved eco-friendly farming techniques act as major drivers for the global organic coffee market growth.

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The organic food and beverages industry is growing rapidly, which attracts companies to invest in the industry. Moreover, in recent years, several government organizations have also recognized significant growths registered by the organic foods market to come up with new policies to encourage contributors in the organic food sector. For instance, the Peru government has defined the coffee sector as a national priority and have implemented national renovation program with about $70 million budget, similarly, the government in India aids farmers who seek for loans and organic certification. Such government initiatives are expected to bolster production of organic coffee around the world.

The global organic coffee market is segmented into type, packaging type, sales channel, and region. By type it is bifurcated into Arabica and Robusta. On the basis of packaging type, it is segmented into stand-up pouches, jars & bottles, and others. By sales channel, it is studied across hypermarkets/supermarkets, departmental and convenience stores, specialty stores, online sales channels, and others. Region wise, the organic coffee industry is studied across North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and LAMEA. Demand for organic coffee in North America, Western Europe, and Japan remains high. Latin America remains one of the leading producers of organic coffee.

Get detailed COVID-19 impact analysis on the Organic Coffee Market @ https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/request-for-customization/6450?reqfor=covid

Key Findings of the Study:

Some of the key players in the organic coffee market analysis includes Nestle S.A., The Kraft Heinz Company, Starbucks Corporation, Jim’s Organic Coffee, F S Gourmet Private Limited, Wessanen, Complete Coffee Limited, Luigi Lavazza S.p.A., Java Trading Co. LLC, and Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Inc.(Green Mountain).

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Allied Market Research (AMR) is a full-service market research and business-consulting wing of Allied Analytics LLP based in Portland, Oregon. Allied Market Research provides global enterprises as well as medium and small businesses with unmatched quality of “Market Research Reports” and “Business Intelligence Solutions.” AMR has a targeted view to provide business insights and consulting to assist its clients to make strategic business decisions and achieve sustainable growth in their respective market domains. AMR offers its services across 11 industry verticals including Life Sciences, Consumer Goods, Materials & Chemicals, Construction & Manufacturing, Food & Beverages, Energy & Power, Semiconductor & Electronics, Automotive & Transportation, ICT & Media, Aerospace & Defense, and BFSI.

We are in professional corporate relations with various companies and this helps us in digging out market data that helps us generate accurate research data tables and confirms utmost accuracy in our market forecasting. Each and every data presented in the reports published by us is extracted through primary interviews with top officials from leading companies of domain concerned. Our secondary data procurement methodology includes deep online and offline research and discussion with knowledgeable professionals and analysts in the industry.


Trials to suck carbon dioxide from the air to start across the UK

25 May, 2021
 

This story was originally published by The Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

Climate-heating carbon dioxide will be sucked from the air using trees, peat, rock chips, and charcoal in major new trials across the United Kingdom.

Scientists said the past failure to rapidly cut emissions means some CO2 will need to be removed from the atmosphere to reach net zero by 2050 and halt the climate crisis. The £30 million ($42.5 million) project funded by UK Research and Innovation will test ways to do this effectively and affordably on over 100 hectares (247 acres) of land, making it one of the biggest trials in the world.

Degraded peatlands will be re-wetted and replanted in the Pennines and west Wales, while rock chips that absorb CO2 as they break down in soil will be tested on farms in Devon, Hertfordshire and mid-Wales. Special charcoal called biochar will be buried at a sewage disposal site, on former mine sites and railway embankments.

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The best large-scale ways to use trees to capture carbon will also be examined across the UK, including on Ministry of Defence and National Trust land. The last trial will measure the carbon removal potential of energy crops such as willow and miscanthus grass for the first time at commercial scale. These crops would be burned for energy, with the CO2 emissions trapped and stored underground.

“This is seriously exciting and pretty much world leading,” said Professor Cameron Hepburn, at the University of Oxford and who is leading the coordination of the trials. “Nobody really wants to be in the situation of having to suck so much CO2 from the atmosphere. But that’s where we are — we’ve delayed [climate action] for too long.”

He emphasized that cutting emissions from fossil fuel burning as fast as possible remains vital to tackling global heating: “There’s no suggestion that [CO2 removal] is a substitute for reducing our emissions.”

Scientists at the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have concluded there is no way of keeping the global temperature rise to the internationally agreed target of 1.5 degrees Celsius without both cutting emissions and removing billions of metric tons of CO2 a year by 2050. The UK’s official climate advisers estimate the UK is likely to need to remove about 100 million metric tons of CO2 a year by 2050 to reach net zero.

Carbon removal is also deemed essential because it will be difficult to halt all emissions from sectors such as aviation, farming and cement by 2050. The new trials are part of a £110 million ($142 million) government program that also includes trials of using technology to scrub CO2 directly from the air.

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The coordination hub for the new trials will consider the social, ethical, and legal issues related to removing carbon. For example, said Hepburn: “If you’re grinding up rocks and putting it on land to grow food, then you want to make sure that what’s going into the food system is completely safe — I’m sure it will be.”

There is a current debate on whether carbon removal could be used by companies to offset their emissions, rather than cut them, and whether such offsets can be guaranteed to be genuine.

“We are very alive to the possibility that companies will just use offsetting as greenwashing,” said Hepburn. “Part of what this program is about is to develop the monitoring, reporting and verification frameworks to ensure that removals are genuine.”

Spreading basalt chips on fields will be trialed on arable and grazing land. Chemical reactions that degrade the rock lock CO2 into carbonate minerals within months. It is expected that up to 13 metric tons of CO2 per hectare could be locked up each year. In degraded soils, the rock chips can also help reverse acidification and replenish essential plant nutrients. “The joy is that if it does sequester CO2 and lead to enhanced agricultural productivity, then everybody’s laughing,” said Hepburn.

The trial will be the most comprehensive biochar trial to date and will add 200 metric tons of the material to 12 hectares (29.7 acres) of arable fields and grasslands. The charcoal-like material is produced from wood or organic waste. About 10 metric tons of biochar per hectare can be added to crop fields, but 50 metric tons or more could be buried under grassland. Biochar increases the ability of soil to hold water and nutrients and can help prevent run-off of fertilizers and pesticides.

Coppiced willow and miscanthus grass can provide fuel for power stations and remove CO2 from the air if the exhaust gas is captured and stored underground. The trial will seek the best varieties and planting methods and assess how much carbon is also stored in the plants’ roots. Twenty hectares will be planted and current estimates are of 11-18 metric tons of CO2 being removed per hectare each year.

Today, damaged peatlands are the UK’s biggest source of CO2 emissions from the land and the trials aim to reverse this by blocking drainage and raising water levels. In lowland trials, former agricultural land will be converted into a “carbon farm” and in the upland trials peat will be restored via measures such as planting sphagnum moss. A restored peatland could absorb 10 metric tons of CO2/ha/year, as well as preventing the loss of about 30 tons of CO2/ha/year. Renewed peatland will also help wildlife, flood prevention and water quality.

“Trees represent the most cost-effective way of removing CO2 from the atmosphere, while also delivering benefits such as enhancing biodiversity and recreational and health improvements,” said Professor Ian Bateman, at the University of Exeter, who is leading these trials.

But he warned planting trees can have disastrous consequences, if they are planted on peat and release carbon, for example. The trials will test how to plant the right tree in the right place. The trees will be measured and also surveyed by drone and carbon buildup in the soils will be checked.

Up to 13 metric tons CO2 equivalent/ha/year could be stored, and Bateman said: “You can start now, you just need land and plants. There is huge potential to make an immediate difference towards the goal of net zero by 2050.”

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Biostimulation potential of biochar for remediating the crude oil contaminated soil and plant growth

25 May, 2021
 

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Crude oil contamination is a serious environmental threat to soil and plants growing in it. Biochar has the potential of biostimulation for remediation of crude oil-contaminated soil. Therefore, the current research was designed to analyze the bio-stimulatory impact of biochar for remediating the crude oil contaminated soil (10%, and 15%), and growth of maize under glasshouse conditions. Biochar was produced by pyrolysis of Australian pines at 350 °C. Soil incubations were done for 20 days. The results of soil analysis showed that the crude oil degradation efficiency of biochar was 34%. The soil enzymatic activities had shown 38.5% increase in fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis and 55.6% increase in dehydrogenase activity in soil incubated with biochar in comparison to control. The soil microbial diversity was improved to 41% in biochar treated soil with respect to untreated one, while microbial respiration rate had shown a 33.67% increase in soil incubated with biochar with respect to control under oil stress. Gas Chromatography Mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis had shown the high content of low molecular weight hydrocarbons (C9-C13) in the soil incubated with biochar in comparison to untreated soil. Biochar showed a significant increase in fresh and dry biomass (25%, 14.61%), leaf area (10%), total chlorophyll (11%), water potential (21.6%), osmotic potential (21%), and membrane stability index (12.7%). Moreover, biochar treatment showed a higher increase in the contents of proline (29%), total amino acids (18%), soluble sugars (30.4%), and antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (16.5%), catalase (11%), and peroxidase (12%). Overall, the results of the present study suggest the bio-stimulating potential of biochar for degradation of hydrocarbons in crude oil contaminated soil and their growth-stimulating effects on maize.

Keywords: Biochar; Biostimulation; Crude oil; Maize.

The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

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New £30m large-scale UK trial to remove greenhouse gases begins

25 May, 2021
 

One of the projects will investigate the management of peatlands to maximise their removal of greenhouse gas emissions

A new trial that will see researchers across the UK investigate the viability of five innovative methods of large-scale greenhouse gas (GHG) removal from the atmosphere has kicked off.

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) is investing £30 million in the projects and a central hub located at the University of Oxford to conduct the research over four and a half years.

An additional £1.5 million be invested in further studies in the third year of the research.

The demonstrator projects will investigate the management of peatlands to maximise their GHG removal potential in farmland near Doncaster and at upland sites in the South Pennines and Pwllpeiran in west Wales, enhanced rock weathering and large-scale tree planting to assess the most effective species and locations for carbon sequestration at sites across the UK.

In addition, researchers will also investigate the use of biochar, a charcoal-like substance, as a viable method of carbon sequestration and the rapid scale-up of perennial bioenergy crops such as grass and short rotation coppice willow at locations in Lincolnshire and Lancashire.

According to UKRI, all five methods have the potential to remove GHGs from the atmosphere, however, their effectiveness, cost and limitations need to be better understood and proven at scale.

The results from the research will be used to shape longer term government decision-making on the most effective technologies to help the UK reduce carbon emissions and tackle climate change.

Professor Sir Duncan Wingham, Executive Chair of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), part of UKRI, said: “Reducing GHG emissions is a priority for the UK, but it’s clear that alone that will not be enough to reduce CO2 and meet the UK’s net zero climate target by 2050.

“These projects will investigate how we can actively remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere using innovative technologies at the scale required to protect our planet.

“This investment by UKRI is especially significant as the UK prepares to host COP26 in Glasgow later this year.”

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Grants will help to further study Great Lakes, Finger Lakes

26 May, 2021
 

NEW YORK STATE–The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Syracuse-based Great Lakes Research Consortium (GLRC) announced $121,741 in grant awards for five research projects that will help restore and protect the health of New York’s Great Lakes and surrounding communities.
“Our rapidly changing climate, coupled with increased threats from invasive species, nutrient pollution, and emerging contaminants, are challenging the health of Great Lakes ecosystems,” DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said. “The research grants announced today will help New York state delve deeper into the science of these problems and broaden our ability to address these and future challenges.”
Five projects are receiving 2021 Great Lakes Research Consortium (GLRC) grants including Hobart and William Smith Colleges which will examine several Finger Lakes in the study.
The colleges will receive $25,000 to lead an international team of researchers that will measure shifts in algal abundance, composition, and nutrients over the past century. HWS Associate Professor of Geoscience Tara Curtin, Ph.D., will work with HWS Finger Lakes Institute Post-Doctoral Research Scientist Michael Brown, Ph.D., to lead the project team that includes researchers with Cornell University; Syracuse University; and the University of Regina, Saskatchewan. The team will evaluate the records of Canandaigua Lake, Cayuga Lake, Owasco Lake, and Seneca Lake, which have all experienced toxic HAB events since 2017. The team will use sediment cores to develop a long-term record of HABs and the associated environmental drivers as a data-based tool for developing mitigation strategies. New York’s Ontario County Water Resources Council is providing additional funding for this work.
In addition, the Seneca Watershed Intermunicipal Organization will be granted $23,000 to collaborate and evaluate optimizing the design of phosphorus sorption technology (removal) for deployment in agricultural settings in the Great Lakes region. In collaboration with the Finger Lakes Institute, the Yates, Seneca, and Ontario County Soil and Water Conservation Districts, and Seneca Farms Biochar in Odessa, Seneca Watershed Steward Ian Smith will lead this project to inform the design of field-scale systems that would be USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service-approved best management practices for mitigating phosphorus and HABs.
Other projects include funding to Clarkson University, Binghamton University and SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry.
“The Great Lakes Research Consortium is pleased to support a wide range of projects from across New York state to address important issues including invasive species, harmful algal blooms, changing water levels in Lake Ontario, the identification of new and emerging contaminants, and the use of phosphorus sorption technology,” said Great Lakes Research Consortium Director Gregory L. Boyer, Ph.D. “These small grant awards support first-of-their-kind and basic foundational research that is essential if we are to properly manage and conserve New York’s critical freshwater resources.”
This grant program is funded by New York’s Environmental Protection Fund. The Great Lakes Research Consortium is an organization of 18 colleges and universities in New York state, plus nine affiliate campuses in Ontario, Canada, dedicated to collaborative Great Lakes research and science education. Learn more at www.esf.edu/glrc.

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BIOCHARS AND BIOCHAR TREATMENT PROCESSES – diagram, schematic, and image 30

26 May, 2021
 

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UK BEIS selects biomass projects for carbon capture competition

26 May, 2021
 

The U.K. Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on May 24 announced 24 project have been selected for phase one of its direct air capture and greenhouse gas (GHG) removal technologies competition. Nearly half of those projects involve biomass.

The competition launched in June 2020, offering up to £100 million of new research and development funding to help develop direct air capture technologies in the U.K. As part of that effort, the competition aims to support the development of greenhouse gas removals (GGR) technologies to help them achieve commercialization. Phase two of the competition will support further development of the most promising phase one technologies.

Biomass-related projects selected under phase one include:

Biohydrogen GHG removal demonstration—Led by Advanced Biofuels Solutions Ltd., along with Progressive Energy Ltd. and University College London, the project aims to optimize the production of biobased hydrogen with CCS. Project partners will develop a design and project delivery plan for a demonstration plant that will capture 1,800 metric tons of CO2 annually.

Bio-waste to biochar via hydrothermal carbonization and post-carbonization—The project, led by the University of Nottingham with partners CPL Industries and Trent Green Power, aims to establish the feasibility and optimize the process of producing biochar from biowaste. Digestate residue will be treated by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) at a pilot plant. The resulting biocoal will be treated in a pilot plant to establish the quality of the biochar for sequestration that can be obtained by post-carbonization.

Mersey Biochar: Carbon negative community energy—Led by Severn Wye Energy Agency with Pure Leapfrog and PyroCore, the project will develop pyrolysis technology to incorporate enhanced carbon capture capacity, and to produce a range of marketable outputs, including biochar, carbon products for construction and heat for a local district heating network.

CCH2: Carbon capture and hydrogen production from biomass—KEW Technology has a gasification technology that converts biomass into hydrogen-rich gas. The project will develop designs for additional modules that will upgrade the gas to produce high-purity hydrogen and CO2 streams.

Negative emissions gasification—Led by Drax Corp., the project will further develop gasification as a future carbon negative technology.

The Biochar Network: A road to demonstration and beyond—Sofies U.K. will work with several industry and research partners to create an integrated biochar network consisting of one of the largest forestry and sawmilling businesses in the U.K. and a cooperative of more than 2,000 dairy farms.

Integration of biochar and enhanced mineral weathering carbon capture technologies into linear infrastructure projects—Arup, in conjunction with Costain and the Universities of Edinburgh and Newcastle, will explore the feasibility of using biochar and enhanced rock weathering for application on a large-scale infrastructure project.

BIOCCUS—Led by Ricardo U.K. Ltd., the project involves the design of carbon capture technology that includes biochar production, combined-heat-and-power (CHP) generation, and carbon dioxide capture, utilization and storage, using undried waste wood from sustainably sourced domestic timber.

REVERSE COAL: Development of a long-term solution to store and abate carbon whist generating food—Lapwing Energy Ltd., with assistance from University of Lincoln and the U.K. Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, will use short willow coppice on rewet degraded peat soils to produce biochar via pyrolysis.

Circular greenhouse gas removal (GGR) solution utilizing biochar produced from low-grade biomass—Led by Capchar Ltd. with partners Biochar Project Services Ltd. and U.K. Hardwoods Ltd., the project aims to demonstrate that low-grade biomass can be converted into biochar and sequestered in U.K. soils.

InBECCS—Peel NRE and Bioenergy Infrastructure Group will develop and design a 20-tons-per-day CO2 capture demonstration plant that is underpinned by C-Capture technology and a 28.5 MW biomass gasification unit.

Additional information, including a full list of phase one project, is available on the U.K. BEIS website

 


My Turn: Forests are critical for life on our planet

26 May, 2021
 

We need our state and national leaders to clearly take aggressive action to stop climate change. Unfortunately, not only are corporate interests ruthlessly fighting against the interests of saving life on our planet for their own financial interests, they are spreading outrageous falsehoods to confuse the issues that need to be addressed.

For example, in the town of Shutesbury, there have been several letters from those who have financial interests in a project to destroy acres and acres of privately owned forests to place fields of solar energy. While we very much need to replace nuclear and fossil fuels with clean renewable energy like solar, PV panels need to be placed on roofs, parking lots and already vacant lots. We desperately need to protect forests from commercial logging for any reason. We are losing forests at alarming rates.

When clean energy projects replace forests, we completely remove the many benefits that the clean energy could provide. Responsible solar companies do not clear forests for their renewable energy. Responsible companies to not manipulate data to pretend and convince officials that they are taking down forests to benefit us.

Outrageous falsehoods are also being spread by the logging and woody biomass industries offering itself as a solution to the climate crisis. Those who would profit from woody biomass or biochar are successfully lobbying governmental agencies and officials with manipulated data demanding that biomass become considered renewable and therefore subject to financial benefits. It takes decades for a forest to regrow to achieve the amount of carbon sequestration and bio diversity that intact and wild forests provide. In a time of climate emergency and biodiversity loss, we need wild, intact forests to save future generations from disaster.

Forests are critical for life on our planet. Wild forests contain numerous ecosystems which are homes to diverse species in their rich soils, undergrowth, leaves, bark, trunks, branches and more. Forests are necessary for the water cycle, weather, clean water, clean air, pure soils and more. Exploiting and excavating our forests for the products that feed economic gain for the few, sacrifices life on our planet.

It is time for the well-being of life on Earth to become the primary focus of our leaders. If public well-being became the primary focus, instead of financial growth, satisfying jobs that help the world could be developed. We would be able to save our planet for future generations and at the same time, provide beneficial lifestyles that would work for everyone, not just the top 1 percent.

NORTHAMPTON — Eric Carle, the beloved children’s book author and illustrator whose classic “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” and other works gave…

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Effects of biochar application and irrigation rate on the soil phosphorus leaching risk of fluvisol …

26 May, 2021
 

Biochar application was reported to influence soil phosphorus (P) leaching, but the reports are conflicting, and could be related to soil depth and water management. A field trial of a Wild Cabbage-Chinese Cabbage rotation was used to investigate the effect of biochar application and irrigation volume on P leaching risk in fluvisol soil profiles (0-20 cm, 20-50 cm, 50-100 cm) in the Chaobai River basin. The experiment included two biochar levels [0 (-BC), 30 t/hm2 (+BC)], and two irrigation levels [conventional irrigation (CI) and water-saving irrigation (WSI)]. The irrigation rate of WSI was 80% of CI. The results demonstrated that there was no significant difference in soil leachable P in the soil profiles under the two irrigation volumes, while biochar application tended to increase soil leachable P in the top layer soil (0-20 cm) and subsurface layer soil (20-50 cm) irrespective of the irrigation rate. The average value of the P leaching “change point” in the soil profiles with +BC was significantly higher than that with -BC (0-20 cm: 35.52 mg kg-1 vs. 25.86 mg kg-1; 20-50 cm: 27.61 mg kg-1 vs. 20.02 mg kg-1). Additionally, the P leaching risk was observed in all top layer soil (0-20 cm) irrespective of irrigation rate and biochar application, and the P leaching risk in the subsurface layer (20-50 cm) with +BC was lower than that with -BC, especially under WSI. Therefore, it is recommended that biochar application combined with water-saving irrigation could be used as a measure for controlling soil phosphorus leaching under open field vegetable rotation in the alluvial soil of Chaobai River basin.

据报道,生物炭的施用会影响土壤磷(P)的浸出,但这些报告相互矛盾,并且可能与土壤深度和水管理有关。野白菜-大白菜轮换的田间试验用于调查潮白地区氟维索土壤剖面(0-20厘米,20-50厘米,50-100厘米)中生物炭的施用和灌溉量对磷淋溶风险的影响。流域。实验包括两种生物炭水平[0(-BC),30 t / hm 2(+ BC)]和两个灌溉级别[常规灌溉(CI)和节水灌溉(WSI)]。WSI的灌溉率为CI的80%。结果表明,在两种灌溉量下,土壤剖面中的土壤可浸出磷没有显着差异,而生物炭的施用趋向于增加表层土壤(0-20厘米)和地下土壤(20-200厘米)中的土壤可浸出磷。 50厘米),与灌溉速率无关。+ BC的土壤剖面中P淋失“变化点”的平均值显着高于-BC(0-20 cm:35.52 mg kg -1与25.86 mg kg -1; 20-50 cm: 27.61 mg kg -1与20.02 mg kg -1)。另外,无论灌溉速率和生物炭施用量如何,在所有表层土壤(0-20 cm)中均观察到了磷淋失风险,+ BC的地下层(20-50 cm)中磷淋失风险低于土壤渗碳风险。 -BC,尤其是在WSI下。因此,建议将生物炭与节水灌溉相结合,作为控制潮白河流域冲积土在露天蔬菜轮作下土壤磷淋失的一种措施。


Most Americans support soil carbon storage as a climate strategy

26 May, 2021
 

Last year, as countries around the globe locked down because of the coronavirus, carbon emissions fell sharply. It was an important reminder that society is capable of quickly and dramatically reducing its greenhouse gas emissions to curb climate change. But emissions reductions alone might not be enough. Removing carbon that is already in the atmosphere may be necessary to avoid catastrophic warming. 

But do politics really make soil carbon storage “elusive,” as some have suggested? 

To investigate, we surveyed a random sample of 1,222 U.S. adults who reported believing in climate change at least “somewhat” (92 percent of our initial sample) about their support for soil carbon storage as a strategy for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Because we anticipated many people might be unfamiliar with this climate mitigation strategy, respondents were first provided with a brief description of soil carbon storage alongside other carbon dioxide removal strategies

Rather than resistance, our research shows broad public support. A majority of our respondents (62 percent) said they were “very likely” or “somewhat likely” to support soil carbon storage as a carbon dioxide removal strategy. Slightly fewer — but still a majority (55 percent) — supported a different version of soil carbon storage that involved biochar, a form of charcoal made from unused plant material and manure from farms that is then mixed into soil.  

But what about political partisans? Unsurprisingly, Democrats expressed more support than Republicans for both soil carbon storage (73 percent) and soil carbon storage with biochar (65 percent). However, even Republicans said they were more likely (52 percent) than unlikely (16 percent) to support soil carbon storage, which was also true when the approach included biochar (47 percent likely vs. 25 percent unlikely). The remainder said they were “neutral.”                                                                                                            

What about farmers, a group that could store a critically important amount of carbon if incentivized to adopt soil carbon practices? They voiced clear support as well. Although our survey included only 48 respondents who identified as “a farmer,” a majority of this group said they were likely to support soil carbon storage, with (59 percent) or without (66 percent) biochar. Only 16 percent and 7 percent, respectively, said they were unlikely to support it (the remainder were “neutral”). If farmers were truly resistant to soil carbon storage as a carbon dioxide removal strategy, we might have expected the opposite pattern. Instead, we see much more acceptance than resistance.

To be sure, these findings might have looked different had our survey included opinions from those who said they didn’t believe in climate change. But because this was such a small group (just 8 percent of our initial sample), it is unlikely that the results would have changed by much. 

Overall, these findings suggest that using soil carbon storage to address climate change is not only technically feasible but that it may enjoy more bipartisan support than previously assumed. It also suggests that U.S. farmers, who are poised to play a key role in its adoption and implementation, are open to the idea of using farmland to store carbon in order to address climate change.

As countries around the world, including the U.S., commit to ambitious climate targets and carbon dioxide removal strategies are more frequently debated in policy circles, understanding where resistance among the public lies — and where it doesn’t — is more important than ever. 

Jonathon P. Schuldt is an associate professor in the Department of Communication and board member of the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Cornell University.

Shannan K. Sweet is a research associate in the Department of Communication and the Soil and Crop Sciences Section at Cornell University.

Johannes Lehmann is a professor in the Soil and Crop Sciences Section at Cornell University.

Deborah Bossio is the lead soil scientist for The Nature Conservancy.

Dominic Woolf is a senior research associate in the Soil and Crop Sciences Section at Cornell University. 

View the discussion thread.

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Effects of biochar application and irrigation rate on the soil phosphorus leaching risk of fluvisol …

26 May, 2021
 

A cascade extraction method was used to evaluate the soil phosphorus leaching risk from soil profiles in a field trial.

Biochar application increased soil leachable phosphorus, but it did affect the risk of phosphorus leaching.

Biochar application increased the soil phosphorus leaching change point in open vegetable fields due to the biochar-induced increase in SOM.

Biochar application decreased the soil phosphorus leaching risk in open vegetable fields due to the biochar-induced increase in the soil P leaching change point.

Biochar application combined with water-saving irrigation could be used as a measure for controlling soil phosphorus leaching under open field vegetation rotations.

A cascade extraction method was used to evaluate the soil phosphorus leaching risk from soil profiles in a field trial.

Biochar application increased soil leachable phosphorus, but it did affect the risk of phosphorus leaching.

Biochar application increased the soil phosphorus leaching change point in open vegetable fields due to the biochar-induced increase in SOM.

Biochar application decreased the soil phosphorus leaching risk in open vegetable fields due to the biochar-induced increase in the soil P leaching change point.

Biochar application combined with water-saving irrigation could be used as a measure for controlling soil phosphorus leaching under open field vegetation rotations.

Biochar application was reported to influence soil phosphorus (P) leaching, but the reports are conflicting, and could be related to soil depth and water management. A field trial of a Wild Cabbage-Chinese Cabbage rotation was used to investigate the effect of biochar application and irrigation volume on P leaching risk in fluvisol soil profiles (0-20 cm, 20-50 cm, 50-100 cm) in the Chaobai River basin. The experiment included two biochar levels [0 (-BC), 30 t/hm2 (+BC)], and two irrigation levels [conventional irrigation (CI) and water-saving irrigation (WSI)]. The irrigation rate of WSI was 80% of CI. The results demonstrated that there was no significant difference in soil leachable P in the soil profiles under the two irrigation volumes, while biochar application tended to increase soil leachable P in the top layer soil (0-20 cm) and subsurface layer soil (20-50 cm) irrespective of the irrigation rate. The average value of the P leaching “change point” in the soil profiles with +BC was significantly higher than that with -BC (0-20 cm: 35.52 mg kg-1 vs. 25.86 mg kg-1; 20-50 cm: 27.61 mg kg-1 vs. 20.02 mg kg-1). Additionally, the P leaching risk was observed in all top layer soil (0-20 cm) irrespective of irrigation rate and biochar application, and the P leaching risk in the subsurface layer (20-50 cm) with +BC was lower than that with -BC, especially under WSI. Therefore, it is recommended that biochar application combined with water-saving irrigation could be used as a measure for controlling soil phosphorus leaching under open field vegetable rotation in the alluvial soil of Chaobai River basin.


Biochar as a Soil Amendment Tool: Effects on Soil Properties and Yield of Maize and Cabbage in …

26 May, 2021
 


Role of biochar in anaerobic digestion based biorefinery for food waste

26 May, 2021
 

DANS is an institute of KNAW and NWO


Rooted in the community, Reunity Resources farm opens for season

26 May, 2021
 

May 26—Mark Bundy looked at over the field of greens before him and smiled.

"I like that what you are buying is grown right here, right within sight," he said, his arms full of fresh-bought goods from the Reunity Resources community farm in Agua Fría.

The farm, previously known as the Santa Fe Community Farm, opened Tuesday for its third season under the nonprofit Reunity Resources. Fresh beets, broccoli, turnips, lettuce, scallions, spinach and tomatoes stood tall, as if called to military attention, while patrons, children and friendly dogs roamed the 1 1/2 -acre property.

The farm has a long history in Santa Fe, dating to the late 1940s when it opened under founder John Stephenson. He died in 2017 at the age of 102, putting the farm's future into doubt for two years.

Reunity Resources, a community farm and composting organization that turns food waste into soil and provides education on nutrition and agriculture, took over the farm in 2019.

The farm has long provided accessible fresh produce to needy families in the community, and new signs of renewed life are popping up. One is a communal refrigerator housed in a small shack near the front gate of the property. The appliance will contain free food for those who need it.

Also, a new food wagon on the premises, Rose's Kitchen, provides freshly made meals, salads and pastries made from locally grown food products. On Tuesday, volunteers were making biochar adobe bricks in a nearby children's educational garden, where kids can learn about the importance of growing food.

Juliana Peterson Ciano, program director for Reunity Resources, said the idea is to tie people back to the land.

"It's been exciting to reinvigorate this place," she said. "This area has had 7,000 years as farmland."

The farm has a story to tell, said Chandler Callahan, one of several workers on the property. It's the tale of people turning time and again to the land to make a living; grow food to provide for their families; and gather to share ideas, dreams and a love of community.

"I like the sense of togetherness that it brings," she said of the farm. "There's a real sense of fun and joyful anticipation because of the impact we have on one another, and the impact the community has on us."

That communal dependence and support was evident in 2020. Though it was a difficult time for many amid the pandemic, Ciano said it was a good year for the farm.

"Lots of businesses were shuttered," she said. "We quadrupled our business. There was so much need for food."

Grayce Zayas was one of the people who came to the farm last year. She said it's her "favorite place in the world" — an "oasis" where she can shop with her daughter, Maxine, and teach her how the food they eat is produced.

"For us, the fresh food aspect is the most inviting thing," she said as her 4-year-old daughter ran back and forth in a long line on the farm, as if to prove she were the fastest child on Earth.

Ciano said she hopes the farm continues to grow and offer more programs. In the autumn, Reunity Resources worked with other local nonprofits to start a new youth-run community garden in the village to address food insecurity and train young people to work the land.

She wants to find ways to use the farm to inspire people to get "skilled up" with tools to farm and cook healthy food, among other goals.

The farm, she said, serves as an intersection of culture, history and food, one that brings about a "wistfulness and nostalgia" to its visitors.

"They want to know where their food comes from," she said. "There is a real rootedness here. The community craves that."


Potential of biochar bamboo and sub-bituminous coal as amendment of acid mineral soils for …

26 May, 2021
 

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Improvement the characteristics of acid mineral soil [Ultisols] is needed to support plant productivity. However, the utilization of biochar combined with sub-bituminous in improving ultisol is still limited. Therefore, this research was conducted by using treatments: 1] Control 0% Sub-bituminous [SBC] + 0% Bamboo Biochar [B]; 2] 100% SBC [20 ton.ha−1]; 3] 75% SBC + 25% B; 4] 50% SBC + 50% B; 5] 25% SBC + 75% B; and 6] 100% B [20 ton.ha-1] This study was designed using Completely Randomized Design [CRD] with 3 replications. The results showed that the application of combined biochar and sub-bituminous had a significant effect in improving ultisol’s fertility characteristics. There are two treatments that provide the most significant results for improving soil properties, namely 100% sub-bituminous treatment with a significant effect in increasing pH [1.3 pH units], Organic carbon [3.34%], Total N [0.12%], CEC [10.87 cmol/kg and Ca2+ [1.2%]. However, 50% sub-bituminous + 50% bamboo biochar treatment have a significant effect in increasing Available P [1.1 ppm], CEC [9.04 cmol/kg K+ [0.51 cmol/kg], Ca2+ [1.37 cmol/kg], and Mg2+ [1.27 cmol/kg]. In addition, application of 50% sub-bituminous + 50% bamboo biochar gave the best result for the plant height, branches and leaves of the coffee plants.

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Biochar Market Size 2020 Global Trend, Segmentation, Regional Outlook and Opportunities …

26 May, 2021
 

The report offers insightful and detailed information regarding key players operating in the biochar market & their future strategies.

Request sample copy at: https://www.adroitmarketresearch.com/contacts/request-sample/698

There are cohesive government schemes for waste management leading to the growth of global biochar market. Taking measures for the climate change and need for sustainable agriculture are showing opportunities in the global biochar market. Bio char provides a solution for long-term carbon sequestration, contaminant remediation, and increased soil microbial biomass. Bio char has been considered beneficial in enhancing organic nature of soil and reducing emissions of highly potent greenhouse gases including nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide.

There are a certain lack of awareness for the production, consumption and availability of the bio char. The high cost of bio char and the labour issues may cause some hindrance in the global bio char market. Helping the degrading soil quality to improve, which in turn improves crop productivity which caters the increasing population is an opportunity for the global biochar market.

Read more details at: https://www.adroitmarketresearch.com/industry-reports/biochar-market

The global biochar market is categorized into several segmentation including technology, Feedstock, application and region. Based on the technology, the global biochar market is divided into Gasification, Pyrolysis and others. Based on the manufacturing process slow pyrolysis, Gasification, Fast an intermediate pyrolysis, the global biochar market is classified into Agricultural Waste, Animal Manure, Woody Biomass, and others. On the basis of types of application, the global biochar market is segregated Agriculture, Forestry, electricity generation and others. Looping on to the regional overview, the global biochar market is a wide range to North America, USA, Canada, Mexico, Egypt, Asia Pacific, China, Japan, Korea, India, Southeast Asia, The Middle East and Africa, UAE, Turkey, Nigeria, South Africa, Argentina, Europe, France, UK, Russia, Italy, South America, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, Germany, and Columbia. Leading players of the global biochar market includes Pacific Pyrolysis, Phoenix Energy, Airex Energy, BSEI, Diacarbon Energy, 3R ENVIRO TECH Group, Biochar Supreme, Cool Planet Energy Systems, Carbon Terra GmbH, Biochar Ireland, Sunriver Biochar, Pacific Biochar Benefit Corporation, Waste to Energy Solutions Inc., Airex Energy, Carbon Gold, and more others.

Reasons for the study

– Governments of different countries are implementing strict policies to reduce the carbon dioxide emission and switch to biochar

– Biochar has many uses in agriculture industry such as it improves the water holding capacity of soil as well as improves productivity and provide nutrition to soil

– While studying the global biochar market, we observed that there is lack of awareness among farmers about the advantages of biochar in Asia Pacific and Middle East & Africa

– The companies are investing in research and development to improve the technology and help to increase the production of biochar

Purchase updated report at: https://www.adroitmarketresearch.com/researchreport/purchase/698

What does the report include?

– The report focuses on global biochar market technology and its application industries

– The study on the global biochar market includes qualitative factors such as value chain analysis, drivers, and restraints

– The study covers qualitative and quantitative analysis of the market segmented on the basis of biochar technology and application. Moreover, the study provides similar information for the key geographies

– Actual market sizes and forecasts have been provided for all the above-mentioned segments

– The study includes the profiles of key players in the market with a significant global and/or regional presence

Who should buy this report?

The report on the global biochar market is suitable for all the players across the value chain including industries such as waste management and agriculture & livestock farming

Venture capitalists and investors looking for more information on the future outlook of the global biochar market

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Adroit Market Research is an India-based business analytics and consulting company incorporated in 2018. Our target audience is a wide range of corporations, manufacturing companies, product/technology development institutions and industry associations that require understanding of a market’s size, key trends, participants and future outlook of an industry. We intend to become our clients’ knowledge partner and provide them with valuable market insights to help create opportunities that increase their revenues. We follow a code– Explore, Learn and Transform. At our core, we are curious people who love to identify and understand industry patterns, create an insightful study around our findings and churn out money-making roadmaps.

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Carbon sequestration from bamboo biochar on the productivity of ultisols and soybean [Glycine …

26 May, 2021
 

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Arup to explore carbon tech for UK infrastructure schemes

26 May, 2021
 

Arup in collaboration with Costain, the University of Edinburgh, and Newcastle University, will explore the use of biochar for storage of carbon within soil and enhanced rock weathering.

The Arup-led team was awarded the funding, made available from the government’s £1bn Net Zero Innovation Portfolio, through submission of a proposal to Phase One of the BEIS Direct Air Capture and other Greenhouse Gas Removal technologies competition.

While both these technologies have already proved effective for direct capture of CO2 in agriculture settings, this project aims to demonstrate these technologies can be upscaled for application to UK infrastructure schemes.

The team will assess the challenges and benefits of this technology application and engage with industry stakeholders through consultation. It will also design pilot schemes for demonstration on a live infrastructure project and identify potentially suitable sites.

The project has been funded by the government’s Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

Dan Raynor, associate director at Arup, said: “Our team will be focusing on two technologies known to be effective for direct carbon capture, but which have not previously been applied at scale in an infrastructure setting.

“This is an exciting opportunity for us to explore how these innovative technologies could be used globally as a sustainable application in the built environment to contribute towards carbon reduction targets.

“We are delighted to have been awarded this funding by BEIS and look forward to delivering this work together with our collaborators, Costain, the University of Edinburgh and Newcastle University.”

Energy Minister, Anne-Marie Trevelyan, added: “We are determined to tackle climate change and make it win-win for both our planet and our economy.

“Today’s major cash boost – targeted at our most polluting industries – will encourage the rapid development of the technologies we need to reign in our emissions and transition to a green economy, one that reduces costs for business, boosts investment and creates jobs.”


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27 May, 2021
 

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This Textile Coatings market report also gives an overview of market criteria such as sales strategies, key players, and investments. Knowing the buying preferences of consumers is crucial for key players who want to introduce new products to the market. Primary key market players, consumer buying preferences, and sales methods are all covered in this Textile Coatings market report. This Textile Coatings market report also discusses the dynamic market’s expanding prospects and opportunities in the future. This type of market analysis allows for a fast assessment of the global market situation. The Textile Coatings market report offers useful information about the key contributors, company strategies, consumer preferences, and improvements in customer behavior. Furthermore, it provides an exact sales count as well as the customer’s buying patterns. The COVID-19 Pandemic has an effect on a wide range of industries.

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Solvay
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Lubrizol
Clariant AG
Covestro AG
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Global Textile Coatings market: Type segments
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Fine Biochar Powder Market Size, Share, Demand and Forecasts Report till 2025

27 May, 2021
 

Global Fine Biochar Powder Market report provides in-depth analysis of Top Players, Geography, End users, Applications, Competitor analysis, Revenue, Price, Gross Margin, Market Share, Import-Export data, Trends and Forecast. The report offers a comprehensive insight into the development policies and plans in addition to manufacturing processes and cost structures.

Effect of COVID-19: Fine Biochar Powder Market report investigate the effect of Coronavirus (COVID-19) on the Fine Biochar Powder industry. Since December 2020, the COVID-19 infection spread to practically 180+ nations around the world with the World Health Organization pronouncing it a general wellbeing crisis. The worldwide effects of the Covid infection 2020 (COVID-19) are now beginning to be felt, and will essentially influence the Fine Biochar Powder market in 2020

The major types mentioned in the report are Wood Source Biochar, Corn Source Biochar, Wheat Source Biochar, Others, , and the applications covered in the report are Soil Conditioner, Fertilizer, Others, .

Complete report on Fine Biochar Powder market spread across 108 pages, profiling companies and supported with tables and figures is now available @ https://www.insidemarketreports.com/sample-request/14/809836/Fine-Biochar-Powder

With tables and figures helping analyze worldwide Fine Biochar Powder market, this research provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in the market. Companies profiled and studied for this Fine Biochar Powder market report include Diacarbon Energy, ElementC6, Carbon Gold, Agri-Tech Producers, Swiss Biochar GmbH, Biochar Now, BlackCarbon, The Biochar Company, Kina, BioChar Products, Cool Planet, Carbon Terra, and others.

We Empower industries through current Market Trends, Business Intelligence, Qualitative & Quantitative Market Assessment and Solutions for the critical challenges

The report is based upon arduous data analysis carried out by industry doyens. The all-inclusive analysis of these data provides an in-depth and detailed insight into the global Fine Biochar Powder market. The report further provides the new and existing players with information such as company profiles, facts and figures, product picture and specifications, sales, market share and contact information.

For the data information by region, company, type and application, 2020 is considered as the base year. Whenever data information was unavailable for the base year, the prior year has been considered.

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POM(Polyoxymethylene) Market: Classification, Opportunities, Types, Applications, Status and Forecast to 2028

Diphenylamine Rubber Antioxidant Market and Ecosystem by Production, Prospects, Consumption, Cost Structure, Competitive Landscape


1. You Have Purchased Equipment To Manufacture Bio… | Chegg.com

27 May, 2021
 

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Hierarchically porous magnetic biochar as an efficient amendment for cadmium in water and soil …

27 May, 2021
 

K2FeO4 could bestowed synchronously activation and magnetization on biochar.

Large specific surface area and micropore volume could improve remediation.

High alkalinity of biochar was conducive to Cd fixation by precipitation.

Loading Fe on biochar was beneficial to Cd adsorption by surface complexation.

K2FeO4 could bestowed synchronously activation and magnetization on biochar.

Large specific surface area and micropore volume could improve remediation.

High alkalinity of biochar was conducive to Cd fixation by precipitation.

Loading Fe on biochar was beneficial to Cd adsorption by surface complexation.

Three types of hierarchically porous magnetic biochars (HMBs) were prepared by pyrolyzing low-cost wheat straw and potassium ferrate (K2FeO4) under a nitrogen atmosphere at 600, 700 and 800 ºC, respectively, which could be used as amendments for cadmium (Cd) in water and soil. HMB fabricated at 700 ºC (HMB700) had the best remediation performance for Cd in water and soil, which was mainly due to its largest specific surface area and micropore volume. Batch sorption experiments showed that Cd(II) sorption onto HMBs were well-described by a pseudo-second-order model and Sips (Freundlich-Langmuir) model, indicating that HMBs removed Cd(II) mainly through chemical adsorption. MINTEQ modeling evidenced that HMBs adsorbed Cd(II) mainly through precipitation rather than surface complexation. The adsorption behavior of HMB700 to Cd(II) could be explained by surface complexation (–OCd, –COOCd), precipitation (Cd(OH)2 and CdCO3), physical adsorption (rich pore structure) and ion exchange (K+, Ca2+, Mg2+). Furthermore, adding HMBs (1 wt%) (incubation 60 days) could also significantly increase soil pH and electrical conductivity (EC), and significantly reduce the available Cd content in soil (47.97%-61.38%). Adding HMBs could promote the conversion of bioavailable to less bioavailable Cd forms. These results provided a new idea for fabricating agricultural waste-based HMBs to remediate Cd in water and soil.


Air Jordan 1 Mid GS White Black Gold 554725-190 Release Date and How biochar, 'agriculture's …

27 May, 2021
 

By: Mia Martinez
2021-05-27 21:29:20

How biochar, 'agriculture's black gold', is helping cocoa trees to thrive and Air Jordan 1 Mid GS White Black Gold 554725-190 Release Date

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Global Forecasted Consumption of Biochar Fine Granules by Types & Application (2022-2027)

27 May, 2021
 

Global Biochar Fine Granules Market Report has incorporated the analysis of different factors that augment the market’s growth. It constitutes trends, restraints, and drivers that transform the Biochar Fine Granules market in either a positive or negative manner. This report provides the scope of different segments and applications that can potentially influence the Biochar Fine Granules market in the future. The detailed information is based on current trends and historic milestones. This report also provides an analysis of the volume of production about the global market and about each type from 2016 to 2027. It mentions the volume of production by region from 2016 to 2027. Pricing analysis is included in the report according to each type from the year 2016 to 2027, manufacturer from 2016 to 2021, region from 2016 to 2021, and global price from 2016 to 2027.

A thorough evaluation of the restrains included in the Biochar Fine Granules market report portrays the contrast to drivers and gives room for strategic planning. Factors that overshadow the market growth are pivotal as they can be understood to devise different bends for getting hold of the lucrative opportunities that are present in the ever-growing market. Additionally, insights into market expert’s opinions have been taken to understand the market better.

Find more details about this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/global-biochar-fine-granules-market-research-report

(Impact of COVID-19 is covered in this report)

The Biochar Fine Granules market research report includes specific segments by region (country), by manufacturers, by Type and by Application. Each type provides information about the production during the forecast period of 2016 to 2027. By Application segment also provides consumption during the forecast period of 2016 to 2027. Understanding the segments helps in identifying the importance of different factors that aid the market growth.

Key Companies included in Biochar Fine Granules market report are Cool Planet Energy Systems, Biochar Supreme, NextChar, Terra Char, CharGrow, Pacific Biochar, Biochar Now, The Biochar Company (TBC) and more in terms of company basic information, product portfolio, Production, Revenue, Price, Gross Margin (2016-2021) & Recent Developments/Updates.

Inquire for more details or sample report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/1560892

Table of Content:

1 Biochar Fine Granules Market Overview

– Product Overview and Scope, Market Size Growth Rate Analysis by Type, Consumption Comparison by Application, Growth Prospects)

2 Market Competition by Manufacturers

– Market Share, Average Price, Production Sites, Area Served, Product Types, Competitive Situation, Trends, Concentration Rate, Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion

3 Production and Capacity by Region

– Global, North America, Europe, China, Japan, South Korea, India Market Share by Region (2016-2021) & Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin

4 Global Biochar Fine Granules Consumption by Region

– Consumption Market Share for

– North America (U.S.A, Canada)

– Europe (Germany, France, U.K., Italy, Russia)

– Asia Pacific (China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, India, Australia)

– Latin America (Mexico, Brazil)

5 Production, Revenue, Price Trend by Type

– Global Production & Revenue Market Share by Type (2016-2021)

6 Consumption Analysis by Application

– Global Consumption Market Share by Application (2016-2021) & Consumption Growth Rate

7 Key Companies Profiled

– Corporation Information, Product Portfolio, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2016-2021), Main Business and Markets Served

8 Biochar Fine Granules Manufacturing Cost Analysis

– Key Raw Materials Analysis, Price Trend, Key Suppliers, Manufacturing Cost Structure, Industrial Chain Analysis

9 Marketing Channel, Distributors and Customers

10 Market Dynamics

– Trends, Drivers, Challenges, Restraints

11 Production and Supply Forecast

– Production, Revenue Forecast (2022-2027) for North America, Europe, China, Japan, South Korea, and India

12 Consumption and Demand Forecast

– Forecasted Consumption by Countries for North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Latin America

13 Forecast by Type and by Application (2022-2027)

– Global Forecasted Production, Revenue, Price by Type (2022-2027), Forecasted Consumption by Application

14 Research Finding and Conclusion

15 Methodology and Data Source

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Fabrication of microwave assisted biogenic magnetite-biochar nanocomposite: A green adsorbent …

27 May, 2021
 

Non- conventional, biogenic method for fabricating magnetite-biochar-nanocomposite.

Adsorption capacity for phosphate = 7.95 mg/g and nitrates = 5.26 mg/g.

99% and 96% phosphate removal from batch synthetic water and column real wastewater.

High nutrient recovery ensures use of spent adsorbent as soil amendment.

Better selectivity, regenerability and separability ensure advanced adsorbent.

Non- conventional, biogenic method for fabricating magnetite-biochar-nanocomposite.

Adsorption capacity for phosphate = 7.95 mg/g and nitrates = 5.26 mg/g.

99% and 96% phosphate removal from batch synthetic water and column real wastewater.

High nutrient recovery ensures use of spent adsorbent as soil amendment.

Better selectivity, regenerability and separability ensure advanced adsorbent.

Presence of nutrients in municipal sewage water in high concentrations has raised awareness of their reuse as a vital limiting resource. With an aim to recover the nutrients in a form that can be used as a soil amendment, a novel biocompatible nanocomposite ([email protected]) was fabricated using green methods. Polysaccharide induced biogenic magnetite nanoparticles ([email protected]) were immobilized onto the biochar of jackfruit peel (BC) to fabricate [email protected] Microwave irradiation employed during the fabrication of [email protected] involved less energy consumption, high yields and better adsorption performance as compared to BC and other reported biochar-composites. Structural features like mesoporosity, crystallinity, magnetism, functionality and nano-sized dimension was demonstrated in [email protected] Under optimized conditions, batch studies revealed a maximum adsorption efficiency of 7.94 mg/g and 5.26 mg/g for phosphates and nitrates respectively. Thermodynamics revealed the feasibility and exothermicity of the system. The high selectivity in the presence of competing co-anions, high regeneration capacity and better separability enable [email protected] to be used as advanced, economical adsorbent for wastewater applications. High nutrient recovery and biocompatibility ensured the potential of the spent adsorbent to be used as a soil amendment. Breakthrough curves obtained from fixed-bed column tests conducted on agricultural wastewater demonstrated the use of higher bed depths and lower flow rates for achieving higher phosphate removal as well as for ensuring lower unused column bed. The study demonstrated the technological advancement of a biogenic nanocomposite fabricated from green methods over other reported adsorbents for removal and recovery of nutrients from water.


Biochar Market Sales Revenue, Consumption, Growth Rate by top Manufacturers like DRT, Rosin …

27 May, 2021
 

Latest research on Global Biochar Market report covers forecast and analysis on a worldwide, regional and country level. The report offers exhaustive research on market dynamics, key segments, leading players, and different regional markets. It is a complete package of thorough analysis and research on the Biochar market. The report is compiled by subject matter experts and experienced market analysts, which makes it highly authentic and reliable. Readers are provided with a deep analysis of historical and future market scenarios to get a sound understanding of market competition and other important aspects.

Download Free PDF Sample Copy of the Report(with covid 19 Impact Analysis):
https://www.globmarketreports.com/request-sample/142285

Our Research Analyst implemented a Free PDF Sample Report copy as per your Research Requirement, also including impact analysis of COVID-19 on Biochar Market Size

Market Competition:
The competitive landscape of the global Biochar market is broadly studied in the report with large focus on recent developments, future plans of top players, and key growth strategies adopted by them. The analysts authoring the report have profiled almost every major player of the global Biochar market and thrown light on their crucial business aspects such as production, areas of operation, and product portfolio. All companies analyzed in the report are studied on the basis of vital factors such as market share, market growth, company size, production volume, revenue, and earnings.

Market Segment by Type, covers:
B-90
B-115
B-140
Others

Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into:
Coating Industry
Ink Industry
Adhesive Industry
Medical Industry
Pigment Industry
Others

Market Segmentation:
The report offers great insights into important segments of the global Biochar market while concentrating on their CAGR, market size, market share, and future growth potential. The global Biochar market is mainly segmented according to the type of product, application, and region.

Each segment in these categories is extensively researched to become familiar with their growth prospects and key trends. The segmental analysis is highly important to identify key growth pockets of a global market. The report provides specific information on the market growth and demand for different products and applications to help players to focus on profitable areas of the global Biochar market.

Get Free PDF Sample of the Report(with covid 19 Impact Analysis):
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Regions Covered in the Global Biochar Market:

1. South America Biochar Market Covers Colombia, Brazil, and Argentina.
2. North America Biochar Market Covers Canada, United States, and Mexico.
3. Europe Biochar Market Covers UK, France, Italy, Germany, and Russia.
4. The Middle East and Africa Biochar Market Covers UAE, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Nigeria, and South Africa.
5. Asia Pacific Biochar Market Covers Korea, Japan, China, Southeast Asia, and India.

Years Considered to Estimate the Market Size:
History Year: 2015-2021
Base Year: 2021
Estimated Year: 2021
Forecast Year: 2021-2026

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Some Major TOC Points:

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Key highlights of the Biochar Market report:
• Growth rate
• Renumeration prediction
• Consumption graph
• Market concentration ratio
• Secondary industry competitors
• Competitive structure
• Major restraints
• Market drivers
• Regional bifurcation
• Competitive hierarchy
• Current market tendencies
• Market concentration analysis

Customization of the Report:
Glob Market Reports provides customization of reports as per your need. This report can be personalized to meet your requirements. Get in touch with our sales team, who will guarantee you to get a report that suits your necessities.

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Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market 2021 Recent Trends and Growth Forecast by 2026 |Diacarbon …

27 May, 2021
 

Latest research on Global Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market report covers forecast and analysis on a worldwide, regional and country level. The report offers exhaustive research on market dynamics, key segments, leading players, and different regional markets. It is a complete package of thorough analysis and research on the Aluminum Alloy Wheels market. The report is compiled by subject matter experts and experienced market analysts, which makes it highly authentic and reliable. Readers are provided with a deep analysis of historical and future market scenarios to get a sound understanding of market competition and other important aspects.

Download Free PDF Sample Copy of the Report(with covid 19 Impact Analysis):
https://www.globmarketreports.com/request-sample/142284

Our Research Analyst implemented a Free PDF Sample Report copy as per your Research Requirement, also including impact analysis of COVID-19 on Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Size

Market Competition:
The competitive landscape of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market is broadly studied in the report with large focus on recent developments, future plans of top players, and key growth strategies adopted by them. The analysts authoring the report have profiled almost every major player of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market and thrown light on their crucial business aspects such as production, areas of operation, and product portfolio. All companies analyzed in the report are studied on the basis of vital factors such as market share, market growth, company size, production volume, revenue, and earnings.

Market Segment by Type, covers:
Wood Source Biochar
Corn Stove Source Biochar
Rice Stove Source Biochar
Wheat Stove Source Biochar
Other Stove Source Biochar

Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into:
Soil Conditioner
Fertilizer
Others

Market Segmentation:
The report offers great insights into important segments of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market while concentrating on their CAGR, market size, market share, and future growth potential. The global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market is mainly segmented according to the type of product, application, and region.

Each segment in these categories is extensively researched to become familiar with their growth prospects and key trends. The segmental analysis is highly important to identify key growth pockets of a global market. The report provides specific information on the market growth and demand for different products and applications to help players to focus on profitable areas of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market.

Get Free PDF Sample of the Report(with covid 19 Impact Analysis):
https://www.globmarketreports.com/request-sample/140828

Regions Covered in the Global Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market:

1. South America Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Covers Colombia, Brazil, and Argentina.
2. North America Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Covers Canada, United States, and Mexico.
3. Europe Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Covers UK, France, Italy, Germany, and Russia.
4. The Middle East and Africa Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Covers UAE, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Nigeria, and South Africa.
5. Asia Pacific Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Covers Korea, Japan, China, Southeast Asia, and India.

Years Considered to Estimate the Market Size:
History Year: 2015-2021
Base Year: 2021
Estimated Year: 2021
Forecast Year: 2021-2026

Get Chance of up to 50% Extra Discount@:
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Some Major TOC Points:

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Key highlights of the Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market report:
• Growth rate
• Renumeration prediction
• Consumption graph
• Market concentration ratio
• Secondary industry competitors
• Competitive structure
• Major restraints
• Market drivers
• Regional bifurcation
• Competitive hierarchy
• Current market tendencies
• Market concentration analysis

Customization of the Report:
Glob Market Reports provides customization of reports as per your need. This report can be personalized to meet your requirements. Get in touch with our sales team, who will guarantee you to get a report that suits your necessities.

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biochar pulverizers grinding

28 May, 2021
 

Jul 28, 2020Impact Crusher Advantages for Hammer Mill Grinding. Before discussing the new economics of impact crusher usage, it might be well to briefly state the original, and still valid, advantages of the impact crusher in the production of friable aggregates. Low original cost has always been the primary advantage of this equipment.

pin mill grander haghe production affiesklub600 . Grinding mill machine ALPA Powder Technology. All the mills that work in impact manner such as hummer mill, discs mill, pin mill, ball mills, etc, are collectively referred to as impact mill The mill that work by highpressure airflow are called jet mill ALPA is Chinese the largest powder grinding mill manufacturer, and its fine grinding mill

Jul 28, 2020Impact Crusher Advantages for Hammer Mill Grinding. Before discussing the new economics of impact crusher usage, it might be well to briefly state the original, and still valid, advantages of the impact crusher in the production of friable aggregates. Low original cost has always been the primary advantage of this equipment.

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Nov 07, 2019To date, Miles estimates roughly 135 producers of biochar exist across the country, with 54 residing in the Pacific West, 17 in the Plains, 14 in the Southeast, 19 in the Midwest, 20 in the Northeast, and several others not designating a region, according to a recent U.S. Biochar

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Nov 07, 2019To date, Miles estimates roughly 135 producers of biochar exist across the country, with 54 residing in the Pacific West, 17 in the Plains, 14 in the Southeast, 19 in the Midwest, 20 in the Northeast, and several others not designating a region, according to a recent U.S. Biochar

Nov 07, 2019To date, Miles estimates roughly 135 producers of biochar exist across the country, with 54 residing in the Pacific West, 17 in the Plains, 14 in the Southeast, 19 in the Midwest, 20 in the Northeast, and several others not designating a region, according to a recent U.S. Biochar

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either product increases the possibilities of the fuels usability in existing pulverizers. Until very recently, neither of the fuels has been available in test burn quantities. However, in late June 2010, New Earth made a sufficient amount 100 tons of biochar, for which the BWL already had an air permit, available to the BWL for test purposes.

either product increases the possibilities of the fuels usability in existing pulverizers. Until very recently, neither of the fuels has been available in test burn quantities. However, in late June 2010, New Earth made a sufficient amount 100 tons of biochar, for which the BWL already had an air permit, available to the BWL for test purposes.

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Epoxy Putty Market Disclosing Latest Advancement 2021 to 2027

28 May, 2021
 

Epoxy Putty market report points out problem areas in the business and also presented what areas can expand the business by increasing the customer base. It also helps you make sound market decisions and develop effective strategies. This Epoxy Putty market report aids in the setting of attainable goals, allowing industries to reap large profits. The industry research analysis is necessary to gain a better understanding of current market trends. With the help of this Epoxy Putty Market Research, you can gain a competitive advantage in the business market. The price level, supply, and demand of the product are all explained in the market report. It also explains the market trend for that specific product. It demonstrates the consequences of the COVID-19 health crisis on several industries. Many different sectors of the world economy have been devastated by the COVID-19 epidemic and related lockdown measures, although a few have seen increased demand. This Epoxy Putty market report looks at which industries performed well during this time, leading businesses’ strategy, and long-term ramifications.

Get Sample Copy of Epoxy Putty Market Report at:
https://www.globalmarketmonitor.com/request.php?type=1&rid=655679

Another main aspect that Market Report focuses on is business condition. It tells about whole market scenario and market growth. A wide range of business facets are also provided such as sales strategies, models, pillars and features. Market Analysis also focuses on some crucial key projections to have strong business outlook. New technologies are also presented to get complete edge above the rest. Numerous industry parameters are also studied under statistical study in the Epoxy Putty Market Report such as sales approaches investments and growth rate. In addition, it also focuses on doing comparison between many different geographical markets.

Major Manufacture:
BASF
Kansai
Nippon Paint
Dupont
AkzoNobel
Sherwin-Williams
Chugoku Marine Paints
PPG Industries
Jotun
Hempel

Segmentation on the Basis of Application:
Construction
Metal Processing
Other

Global Epoxy Putty market: Type segments
Water-based Epoxy Putty
Oil-based Epoxy Putty

Table of Content
1 Report Overview
1.1 Product Definition and Scope
1.2 PEST (Political, Economic, Social and Technological) Analysis of Epoxy Putty Market

2 Market Trends and Competitive Landscape
3 Segmentation of Epoxy Putty Market by Types
4 Segmentation of Epoxy Putty Market by End-Users
5 Market Analysis by Major Regions
6 Product Commodity of Epoxy Putty Market in Major Countries
7 North America Epoxy Putty Landscape Analysis
8 Europe Epoxy Putty Landscape Analysis
9 Asia Pacific Epoxy Putty Landscape Analysis
10 Latin America, Middle East & Africa Epoxy Putty Landscape Analysis
11 Major Players Profile

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The study takes into account a broad range of market impact factors, as well as potential emerging factors for different Types, End-Users, Regions and also covers the COVID-19 impact on the market; in order to identify the most promising growth patterns in the global industry. The business ability and demand potential of more than 34 major powers are covered in the research for presenting the most promising investment fields in North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Latin America, Middle East, and Africa, offering useful opinions on strategic changes for existing groups and new entrants.

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Search – Tag – Pioneer

28 May, 2021
 

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Address:14, Pudur Main Road

Peelamedu, Coimbatore – 641004

Tamilnadu, India

Mobile : +91-9994994429, 9043094429, 9361261941

Website : www.pioneeragroindustry.com

Email:pioneeragro99@gmail.com

Call us:+91 72000 94429


New European Bauhaus event- What should designers and city planners know about biochar

28 May, 2021
 

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Place: Zoom Meeting https://aalto.zoom.us/j/62768242985, Meeting ID: 627 6824 2985

Contact person: Mikko Jalas ([email protected])

This New European Bauhaus workshop collects a series of projects and developed expertise on the use biochar in urban contexts.

Biochar is a material that is linked to urban design and planning in many ways. Its material properties allow for safe and long-term storage of carbon in distributed locations and across different scales. The material properties also allow for various other benefits. Biochar can be used as a mixture in growing media in urban green areas to improve e.g. soil health and water retention. The very same properties enable storm water management. To add, biochar can be used to collect pollution from runoff waters. Finally, biochar production connects to urban waste streams such as building demolition and waste water treatment. Yet, further issues need to be studied and solved to find the best ways to combine the multiple benefits of the material with other conditions and drivers of urban development.

Programme:

What is going on at Jätkäsaari? https://youtu.be/G_4iL18VHl8

Aalto University
P.O. Box 11000 (Otakaari 1B)
FI-00076 AALTO
Switchboard: +358 9 47001


Eco-approach for pharmaceutical removal: thermochemical waste valorisation, biochar adsorption …

28 May, 2021
 

In the present research, an eco-approach for the removal of pharmaceuticals from aqueous environment was developed under de principles of circular economy. Therefore, an eco-friendly adsorbent, biochar, was synthesized by the thermochemical valorisation of rice production waste. The rice bran was pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300–750°C) and a thermal post-treatment was evaluated with the aim to investigate its impact on characteristics and chemical composition of biochars. The obtained biochars were assayed for the removal of a model target pollutant, fluoxetine (FLX), and the biochar adsorption process was characterized in detail. The biochar obtained after the pyrolysis process at 500°C and autoclave post-treatment (BC500A) achieved the highest pollutant removal (92.6%). The pseudo-2nd order kinetic and Freundlich isotherm described well the process, and the primary adsorption mechanism was explained by electrostatic attractions. After that, the regeneration of this eco-friendly adsorbent was evaluated by an innovative electro-Fenton-like process using peroxymonosulfate (PMS) as oxidant agent. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to regenerate biochar using this combined technology. The optimization of operational variables such as current intensity, PMS/FLX ratio, electrode material, and addition of enhancing agents (Fe and citric acid) were evaluated. The regeneration of spent biochar was effectively accomplished under the optimal conditions (150 mA, 75/1 PMS/FLX, and 0.15 mM citric acid). No external addition of Fe was necessary because the mineral content on biochar was enough to reaction took place. Finally, 5 cycles of adsorption-regeneration were performed demonstrating the viability of the developed system. Accordingly, the proposed approach fits with the principles of circular economy, because the global removal of pollutant and valorisation of wastes were achieved.


Be a Better Gardener: Do-it-yourself biochar

28 May, 2021
 

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Cloudy. Periods of light rain early. High 53F. Winds NNE at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 60%..

Cloudy. Low 44F. Winds N at 5 to 10 mph.

Contributed photoPure carbon “biochar” has attracted attention as a means of sequestering carbon in the soil and reducing the amount returned to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide by the decay of organic matter.

Contributed photoPure carbon “biochar” has attracted attention as a means of sequestering carbon in the soil and reducing the amount returned to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide by the decay of organic matter.

It was purely by coincidence, but still it felt right to be speaking to Bill Taylor on Earth Day (April 22). Bill, a committed food grower and environmentalist, was telling me about the history of his involvement with making and using biochar.

I had been hearing about biochar for a number of years, but had never previously bothered to investigate this garden and agricultural soil treatment. So I pricked my ears up when Bill started telling me about what he had been up to recently.

His first job was to explain to me what biochar is. According to Bill, biochar is basically charcoal that has been made by heating wood or other plant wastes in an atmosphere poor in oxygen (a process called pyrolysis). The temperature involved is considerable; ideally, the feed stock should be heated to somewhere around 700-800°F. At this temperature, combustible gases and oils are driven from the feed stock, which is left as more or less pure carbon – “biochar.”

There are a number of ways to process the feed stock, from high tech ovens or “pyrolizers” heated by burning the gases that emerge from the wood or other materials, to the very low tech, the latter being the method Bill favors. His current method, in fact, is not so different from the one that prehistoric Amazonian peoples used to make the terra preta, the “black earth” that characterizes certain areas of the Amazon basin.

Tropical soils are commonly poor because the combination of heat and moisture leads to rapid decomposition of most organic materials such as fallen wood or leaf litter, and the frequent heavy rains leach out minerals. What the indigenous peoples learned was that converting the organic materials to charcoal and then mixing them with manure and household debris, could contribute a long-lasting benefit to the soil. Indeed, the charcoal will persist for centuries, even in tropical conditions, enhancing soil fertility, especially in the case of acidic soils, as well as providing a number of other benefits, such as improved plant growth, a better environment for soil fungal growth, and protection against some plant diseases.

More recently, biochar has attracted attention as a means of sequestering carbon in the soil and reducing the amount returned to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide by the decay of organic matter. Carbon dioxide is the principal gas leading to the heating of the atmosphere by the greenhouse effect, and the production of biochar is seen by its supporters as a method for combating global warming.

Bill Taylor learned about biochar when he and his wife Jaye Alison Moscariello were operating a ranch in Redwood Valley, California, and he brought the knowledge with him when he and Jaye moved to the Berkshire Hills of western Massachusetts last year. As the couple installs an orchard and food gardens around their house, they’ve had a lot of clean-up to do, including the removal of a number of storm-felled trees.

These Bill has treated in a manner he copied from the old-time charcoal burners who left their combustion pits all through the woods surrounding his home in Sandisfield. Bill excavated a circular pit 4 feet wide and 4 1/2 feet deep. He filled it with the waste wood, and then on a snowy day in mid-April (that was when the local fire chief would issue a burn permit), Bill built a fire on top. He used the spray from a hose to damp the fire when it threatened to burn too vigorously – the object was to heat the wood below, not set it afire. From time to time, Bill would turn up the wood to inspect its progress, and when the thinner pieces were carbonized, he transferred the thicker, unfinished chunks to a second pit and continued the burn there, while he wet the first pit to stop its combustion. In 2 ½ hours he was done.

Later, after the biochar cooled, he crushed it with a tamper and, when I came to inspect, Bill showed me how he dug the granules into a pile of cow manure. When this has composted for a year, Bill says, he will add it to any new garden beds he creates or scatter it over existing plantings to let the worms carry it down. There it will remain, a thousand years or more, doing its part to combat global warming.

Thomas Christopher is a volunteer at Berkshire Botanical Garden and is the author or co-author of more than a dozen books.

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Sustainable Missoula: Our naturally brilliant soil does more than support ag

28 May, 2021
 

Food and soil are intimately related with our world’s health, economics, environment, climate, and even some of our largest social and political issues.

On a planet made of carbon, we find ourselves in a unique situation: a carbon crisis, defined by an exorbitant amount of carbon in our atmosphere, leading to a planetary imbalance. Yet the term “carbon crisis” is misleading – every living thing, including ourselves, is made of carbon.

Both the problem and solution to this carbon question rely on balance.

Carbon cycles naturally, creating a beautiful dance of life and death. Once humans figured out how to extract carbon from the fossil pool and burn it for energy, that natural carbon balance was thrown off balance. In fact, CO2 now makes up .0418% of the planet’s overall atmospheric volume, 49% higher than before industrialization (NRCS).

Conventional agriculture further aggravates the delicate balance of life. The act of tilling works up soil, releasing carbon into the atmosphere, which in turn destabilizes the climate. To reestablish balance, excess carbon in the atmosphere needs to be rehomed. Luckily for humanity, nature already has a plan and it’s brilliant.

To understand this plan, we must go back to the basics. Plants photosynthesize, pulling carbon from the air and down through their roots to feed soil, specifically microorganisms that live there. Microorganisms use that carbon to literally make soil. Supporting this natural process through regenerative actions can greatly reduce the amount of carbon in our atmosphere, while also helping heal our farmlands, ranches, and gardens.

Living soil is critical to the overall health of the planet. Regenerating soil systems creates connections underground that lay the foundation for all life on land to thrive.

Healthy soil is very much alive. A teaspoon of soil can contain more living organisms than the Earth’s human population. Storing carbon in our soils does a lot more for our planet than just reducing emissions. Increasing soil health and diversity creates greater holding capacity for water and nutrients. Adding as little as 1-5% more organic matter can help soil retain up to 100,000 gallons of water per acre each year (NRCS).

Not only does soil diversity protect the soil, it’s been proven to grow healthier and better tasting food. Soil expert, Graeme Sait, once said, “Our food is a shadow of what it once was.” Without the microorganisms in the soil, our garden and crop plants can’t access vital minerals and nutrients, meaning neither can we.

Understanding the great carbon exchange under our feet can help us understand this process better. Plants share about 30-40% of their carbon-based carbohydrates with soil organisms. The plants pump it in and the soil organisms store it.

Plants and soil both rely on this great carbon exchange. Plants feed the microbes and the microbes store water, nutrients, and oxygen for the plants all while sharing information and resources through an amazing network of communally-minded microbes and fungi.

Humans have created a “legacy load” of carbon in the atmosphere. How can we support carbon sequestration to create healthier soils? There are many ways to rebuild soil and increase carbon storage, but the use of biochar taps into native philosophy of fire as medicine. Native Americans understood that routine underbrush burning would provide nutrient-rich forage for the animals they hunted. Prescribed fires keep the land and ecosystem productive and abundant.

Biochar is a very porous, high-carbon form of biologically-activated charcoal. Its porous nature provides abundant surface area that increases air-flow, water-retention, and nutrient holding capacity when mixed into soil. Just one gram of biochar has the equivalent surface area of an entire basketball court.

This unique structure provides the perfect home for beneficial bacteria, which protects and defends plant roots. Since biochar is a pure form of carbon, it allows for continual nutrient and mineral exchange within a complex soil network. Over time, biochar in the soil provides and supports a biologically active, carbon storage system.

For example, 1 ton of carbon stored in biochar is equivalent to 3 tons of carbon dioxide permanently removed from the atmosphere.

Storing carbon in our soil is a powerful tool against climate change. It is cost effective, highly efficient, and designed to work with nature anywhere on the planet. The way we grow our food, fuel, and clothes either puts carbon into the atmosphere or back into the soil. We have the choice to work with or against the brilliance of soil.

Caitlyn Lewis is the Executive Director of Soil Cycle, a compost and soil-health focused nonprofit in Missoula, MT. Soil Cycle has recently been working with Bad Goat Forest Products to make and sell biochar soil amendments in hopes to bring light to its amazing yet forgotten qualities. This Sustainable Missoula column is brought to you – via the Missoula Current – every week by Climate Smart Missoula and Home ReSource.

Sustainability Happenings

Here we offer ideas about sustainable ways to stay involved in our community. If you like these offerings, consider signing up for Climate Smart’s eNewsletter here. And sign up for the Home ReSource eNews via their homepage here.

Missoula’s Farmers Markets. Eat local now through the early fall! The original Farmers Market at the north end of Higgins runs every Saturday 8am-12:30 – information here. The Clark Fork Market is now located at 101 Carousel Drive near Dragon Hallow, runs every Saturday 8am -1pm – information is here.

Spring Shift and Transit Scavenger Hunt – Now through June. Mountain Line, Missoula in Motion and others are partnering to shift to sustainable transportation this spring, and beyond! Learn more and join HERE.

BioChar Production Workshop – May 29, 10am-4pm. Hosted by MUD. This is an active, all-day in the woods workshop 20 minutes drive from Missoula. We will show you how to make biochar on a production scale using Wilson Ring-of-Fire Flame Capped Kilns. More info & registration here.

Zero Waste Missoula Meeting – June 2, 4-5pm. Home ReSource is reconvening the Zero Waste Missoula Community Group! Join us for the first meeting of the year on Wednesday, June 2 in the Home ReSource Community Room. The meeting will focus on the group’s history and purpose, along with setting goals and priorities moving forward. All are welcome! RSVP here.

Farm Fresh Pale Ale Beer Launch – June 10. This beer, made from local hops, is a collaboration between CFAC and Imagine Nation Brewery. Proceeds support CFAC’s beginning farmer and rancher trainings, food access programs, and farmland conservation. Available for purchase at Imagine Nation Brewery.

Farm Fresh Pop-Up Pitchfest – June 11th, 5:15-5:45pm at Imagine Nation Brewery. Support local farmers and learn about community investing at CFAC’s upcoming Pop-Up Pitchfest! Local farmers will pitch their business idea and ask for community support through investing in their KIVA loan. For as little as $25, you can invest in the farmer, get repaid, and then choose to repeat again in the future!

Fixit Clinics – June 19, July 17, & Aug. 21, 11am-3pm. Save the dates for upcoming Fixit Clinics, hosted by Home ReSource! Bring your broken items and work with skilled repair coaches to learn how to fix them. More information and sign ups will be posted here.

Bike to Barns tour – Aug. 14-Sept. 30. Explore local farms and flavors on a 15-mile bike tour through Missoula’s Orchard Homes and Target Range neighborhoods. Check back here for more info.

Spontaneous Construction – Sept 18th. Missoula’s festival of creative reinvention! Reuse. Compete. Create. Enjoy! More info and team registration here.

Missoula’s third annual Clean Energy Expo – Sept 25. Climate Smart Missoula and Montana Renewable Energy Association are back to hosting this premier event at Caras Park. Save the Date.

Materials donations to Home Resource keep the wheels of reuse spinning in our community; and remember that everything you need to know about what to do with your unwanted stuff is at www.zerobyfiftymissoula.com.

Find more local activities and events at Missoulaevents.net and on Montana Environmental Information Center’s Conservation Calendar. And you too can help organize events – here’s the 2021 Calendar of Environmental Awareness Days – month by month break down of world day campaigns.

Value local news? Think it’s important to building an informed community? Consider giving $5 a month to keep the local in local news. Missoula likes it that way, and so do we.

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Fe-loaded biochar obtained from food waste for enhanced phosphate adsorption and its …

28 May, 2021
 

Conditions for synthesizing Fe-loaded food waste biochar were optimized using RSM

Temperature and Fe concentrations influenced phosphate adsorption capacity of biochar

Pores developed via pyrolysis helped enhance phosphate adsorption

Phosphate was adsorbed to Fe-FWB via ligand exchange mechanism

Conditions for synthesizing Fe-loaded food waste biochar were optimized using RSM

Temperature and Fe concentrations influenced phosphate adsorption capacity of biochar

Pores developed via pyrolysis helped enhance phosphate adsorption

Phosphate was adsorbed to Fe-FWB via ligand exchange mechanism

The re-utilization of food waste is an eco-friendly method for valorizing waste. In this study, food waste was blended with iron (Fe-FW) and optimized using the response surface methodology (RSM) to produce Fe-loaded food waste biochar (Fe-FWB); moreover, the waste was utilized to probe the adsorption of phosphate in water, where pyrolysis time (1.0, 2.5, and 4.0 h), temperature (300, 450, and 600 °C), and Fe concentrations (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 M) were set as independent variables. After optimizing the Fe-FWB, batch experiments were performed to examine the phosphate sorption characteristics of Fe-FW and Fe-FWB. A pseudo-second order and Elovich kinetic model thoroughly explained the adsorption kinetics, which was indicative of the rate-limited sorption via diffusion or surface coverage after the rapid initial adsorption. The Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson isotherm models more accurately simulated the adsorption of phosphate onto Fe-FW and Fe-FWB than the Langmuir isotherm model. The thermodynamic results presented a positive value of ΔG0, clearly indicating that the reaction was not spontaneous; positive values of ΔH0 and ΔS0 affirmed the endothermic characteristic of phosphate uptake into Fe-FW and Fe-FWB, with an increase in randomness. The adsorption of phosphate onto Fe-FW and Fe-FWB decreased as the solution pH increased from 3 to 11. In the presence of interfering anions, phosphate adsorption onto Fe-FWB was influenced by the coexistence of HCO3, SO42-, and NO3. These results suggest that the synthesized Fe-loaded food waste biochar can be used as an emerging adsorbent for phosphate removal from aqueous solutions.

Equally contributed

ORCID: 0000-0003-2122-5498


Wageningen University: Scope BioSciences and PyroPower win the AtlasInvest Entrepreneurship …

28 May, 2021
 

A diagnostic platform, based on CRISPR-Cas, able to quickly and precisely recognize illnesses, and diminishing waste by turning it into biochar, a carbon soil enhancer, using pyrolysis. These were the two themes with which the Wageningen start-up companies Scope BioSciences en Pyropower turned winners of the AtlasInvest Entrepreneurship Grant. Both start-ups are based on knowledge that is developed at Wageningen University & Research. The award ceremony took place on May 26 in Plus Ultra II building at Wageningen Campus as a pre-event to F&A Next.

The AtlasInvest Entrepreneurship Grant is an initiative of investor Marcel van Poecke and his daughter Heleen van Poecke. Like last year, the winners received a substiantial amount of money and the possibility to make use of the knowledge, experience and network of the jurymembers. The Atlas Invest Entrepreneurship Grant is organised by StartHub Wageningen in cooperation with University Fund Wageningen.

Scope BioSciences – Winner Start-up Award
The Start-Up Award supports student-entrepreneurs who focus on commercially promising solutions for worldwide challenges in the area of nutrition and sustainability. They develop scalable products and services that have the potential to grow. The Start-up Award exists, among others, of an amount of 35.000 euro which they can use to further develop their company.

Scope BioSciences focuses on CRISPR-Cas, them ost important discovery in the area of biotechnology in the last decades. Scope has, in cooperation with Wageningen University & Research developed ScopeDx, a type III CRISPR-Cas diagnostic platform that offers very accurate molecular diagnostic results in less than 25 minutes. The jury was impressed by the potential of the company and the fact that, since the finals of the first edition last year, they have grown and improved tremendously. Scope has an interesting product, different promising routes to the market and the most clear plan of all finalists for his award.

PyroPower – Winner Impact Award
The Impact Award stimulates sociale initiatives of student-entrepreneurs that focus on reaching maximum impact in the area of environment and sustainability. The Impact Award exists, among others, of an amount of 15.000 euro.

Pyropower aims to diminish the impact of waste and stimulate a biochar-based economy.

Through semi-centralized pyrolysis technology, biomass is converted into clean energy and biochar – a promising carbon capturing method for future carbon credits reception. Biochar is able to sequester CO2, improving soil quality and productivity. Pyropower focuses first on the coffee market, where waste in the whole coffee chain contributes to pollution and where subsequently huge impact can be made. The jury thought this was the trongest pitch of the day, clear and with substantial commercial value. Pyropower offers various propositions to the investor and has a product that is also individually affordable.

002–GA–20210526-FT3A9390-2048px-Foto_Guy_Ackermans.jpg
University Fund Wageningen
University Fund Wageningen (UFW) connects people, ideas, and funds, in order to contribute to the growth and blossoming of Wageningen University & Research (WUR). Therefor the fund invests in strengthening contacts between WUR and her alumni, companies and relevant societal organizations. Next to that, UFW rewards and stimulates excellent Wageningen education and research. Alumnus Marcel van Poecke and his daughter Heleen van Poecke have set up a fund by name managed by UFW, from which the AtlasInvest Entrepreneurship Grant is being organized.

Starthub Wageningen
StartHub Wageningen is the startup incubator en guides studenten, PhD’s and recent graduates of WUR. The focus is to develop the entrepreneurial skills and knowledge. StartHub therefor offers a diverse program of support from workshops to personal guidance of start-ups. The AtlasInvest Entrepreneurship Challenge is one of the new possibilities within this palette of entrepreneurial education.


THE BIOCHAR REVOLUTION: TRANSFORMING AGRICULTURE & ENVIRONMENT …

28 May, 2021
 


Novel fabrication of a yeast biochar-based photothermal-responsive platform for controlled …

28 May, 2021
 

For improving the utilization efficiency of pesticides, we developed a novel pesticide delivery particle (YINCP@EC) with a core–shell structure based on yeast biochar, imidacloprid (IMI), ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3), calcium alginate (CA), and ethyl cellulose (EC). Therein, yeast biochar, IMI and NH4HCO3 were absorbed in the network-structured of CA to obtain YINCP through hydrogen bonds. The resulting composite was granulated using an ion gelation technique and then coated with EC to form YINCP@EC. In this platform, yeast biochar serving as a photothermal agent can efficiently convert sunlight energy into thermal energy, thereby triggering NH4HCO3 decomposition into CO2 and NH3 that can break through the EC coating and facilitate IMI release. In addition, the influence of yeast biochar content, pH, and coexisting ions was systematically studied to evaluate the release behavior of IMI from YINCP@EC. Moreover, the hydrophobic EC shell endowed YINCP@EC with high stability in aqueous solution for at least 60 days. Consequently, this novel composite with simple preparation, low cost and remarkable photothermal-responsive properties has a huge application potential in agriculture.

Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.


VOW: Valorization of Organic Wastes into Sustainable Products for Clean-up of Contaminated …

28 May, 2021
 

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Comparison of the effectiveness of biochar vs. magnesite amendments to immobilize metals and …

28 May, 2021
 

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Here we addressed the remediation of a soil severely contaminated by Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn. In this regard, we tested the capacity of magnesite and biochar, inorganic and organic soil amendments, respectively, to reduce metal availability and improve soil properties. To this end, 1-kg pots containing the polluted soil were amended with either magnesite or biochar. Metal availability and soil properties were then measured at days 15 and 75. Also, to evaluate the impact of the two treatments on plant growth, we conducted experimental trials with Brassica juncea L. and compost addition. Both amendments, but particularly magnesite, markedly decreased metal availability. Soil properties were also enhanced, as reflected by increases in the cation exchangeable capacity. However, plant growth was inhibited by magnesite amendment. This observation could be attributable to an increase in soil pH and cation exchange capacity as well as a high Mg concentration. In contrast, biochar increased biomass production but decreased the quantity of metals recovered when the plants are harvested. In conclusion, on the basis of our results, we propose magnesite as a suitable approach for stabilizing contaminated soils (or even spoil heaps) where revegetation is not a priority. In contrast, although biochar has a lower, but still significant, capacity to immobilize metals, it can be used to restore natural soil properties and thus favor plant growth.

Keywords: Biochar; Brownfield; Compost; Magnesite; Metal; Soil recovery.

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Tony Marrero walks through fields

28 May, 2021
 

Cloudy skies. Low 47F. Winds NNE at 5 to 10 mph..

Cloudy skies. Low 47F. Winds NNE at 5 to 10 mph.

Cloudy skies. Low 47F. Winds NNE at 5 to 10 mph..

Cloudy skies. Low 47F. Winds NNE at 5 to 10 mph.

Tony Marrero walks through fields at his home in Rocheport. The field is a place for the new company to test products. Tony and his twin brother, Tom, started Wakefield Biochar in 2014 with their father, a professor of chemical engineering at MU.

Wakefield Biochar is a “high-carbon-content material made from sustainably manufactured organic waste.”

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Twin brothers honor father's legacy through a soil conditioner business

28 May, 2021
 

Partly cloudy skies. High 67F. Winds NE at 10 to 15 mph..

Clear skies. Low 46F. Winds E at 5 to 10 mph.

Partly cloudy skies. High 67F. Winds NE at 10 to 15 mph..

Clear skies. Low 46F. Winds E at 5 to 10 mph.

Tony Marrero walks through fields at his home in Rocheport. The field is a place for the new company to test products. Tony and his twin brother, Tom, started Wakefield Biochar in 2014 with their father, a professor of chemical engineering at MU.

Tony Marrero walks through fields at his home in Rocheport. The field is a place for the new company to test products. Tony and his twin brother, Tom, started Wakefield Biochar in 2014 with their father, a professor of chemical engineering at MU.

Thomas Marrero was a professor of chemical engineering at MU, and after working for 35 years, he was looking to retire.

That is when one of his twin sons, Tony, decided to keep him busy during retirement by starting a business that also included Tom, the second twin.

“Tony has done a number of startups; he enjoys it and thought, let’s maybe start a business with him,” Tom Marrero said.

That’s how Wakefield Biochar was launched in 2014.

Seven years later, even after their father died, the brothers are co-owners of the company, which produces an organic soil conditioner that can be used on lawns, gardens and trees.

“Unfortunately, our dad passed away soon after retiring, from cancer, so that was the sad part about it,” Tom Marrero said. “But we looked at the company and said, you know, it’s actually got some teeth, things are selling, and let’s keep it in honor of our dad and see if we can keep it going.”

Wakefield Biochar is a “high-carbon-content material made from sustainably manufactured organic waste,” Tony Marrero said.

The product is sold locally at Westlake Ace Hardware and others stores, as well as through the company‘s website and online retailers like Amazon.

Biochar is actually charcoal that results from heating biomass like wood at extreme temperatures without oxygen. The idea to use this process as the basis for a business came from research conducted by Tom Marrero, who has a doctorate in chemistry, and his father at MU.

The company started small but eventually took off when positive reviews led to more sales, primarily on Amazon.

“I mean, literally, the idea of the company was to pay our cellphone bills for a family. That was literally all we wanted to do,” Tom Marrero said.

“It was a big deal to be able to sell just a couple of bags here and there, and then people started giving good reviews and it started to build,” he said.

They worked hard to get their product into stores, knocking on the doors of hardware stores and asking them to sell ittheir product. Eventually, they were offered a warehouse to store their product so they could sell through e-commerce on websites like Walmart and Target.

But Tom said his goal was to help the community and the environment before becoming a successful small business owner.

“I’m a scientist, and so small businesses were not that important to me,” he said. “I didn’t have a drive to have a small business. I had a drive to do good things for the environment and learn how to use materials in different ways.”

Military service did help teach him valuable lessons he would later use in a business field, he said.

As an ROTC graduate, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Army in 1994 and actively served for four years. He then was in the Reserves for another six years.

In the Army, he was a team leader with a number of positions. He said he learned to work with people from all parts of the country, as well as understand budgeting and personnel issues.

“I learned how to manage goals and the vision of a unit, the vision of a company, strategically as well as tactically,” he said.

The brothers proudly claim they are a veteran- and minority-owned business on the front page of their website.

“We value that part of it as well and that part of our family history, so to say that we’re veteran- and minority-owned is something. We want people to know that we’ve done things that I think are good and we’re part of a history that we’re proud of,” Tom Marrero said

Reviews of their product on Amazon are typically given four or five stars. According to one review, “Biochar is incredibly easy to use and has wonderful environmental benefits. Wakefield’s price is great and it is shipped quickly. I like this company.”

Tony Marrero said a typical day running their small business means wearing a lot of hats.

“You’re prioritizing your day and understanding is it a marketing day, a finance day, a human resources day or a product development day?” he said.

Both men say they hope to continue to grow the business in honor of their father and keep it around for years to come.

“We are proud of who we are and where we came from,” Tony Marrero said.

What: Wakefield Biochar

Who: Tom and Tony Marrero

Where: Hardware stores and online retailers

When: Open 24 hours

Contact information: 573-479-0468

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Biochar Stages 1&2 (PYR) — University of Edinburgh Research Explorer

28 May, 2021
 

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Applicative Insights on Nascent Role of Biochar Production, Tailoring and Immobilization in …

28 May, 2021
 

Biochar has versatile characteristic for enzyme immobilization support.

Immobilization aids to increased shelf life, stability and reusability of enzyme.

Adsorption aids to be profound economic method preventing enzyme conformational alteration.

Covalent binding averts enzyme leeching and desorption.

Enzyme biochar complex is an efficient contaminant removal system and has potential to increase enzyme activity in bio-fuel production.

Biochar has versatile characteristic for enzyme immobilization support.

Immobilization aids to increased shelf life, stability and reusability of enzyme.

Adsorption aids to be profound economic method preventing enzyme conformational alteration.

Covalent binding averts enzyme leeching and desorption.

Enzyme biochar complex is an efficient contaminant removal system and has potential to increase enzyme activity in bio-fuel production.

Biochar or agrichar the carbon rich source has been appreciated globally for its versatile properties like large surface area, high level porosity, thermal stability and long shelf life. The advent of such properties and the fact that it can be obtained at low operational costs has created phenomenal applications for biochar to be used in biotechnological and agricultural industries. Availability and high cost of production of enzymes has lead immobilization to be served as fruitful technique to maintain the price efficacy. Endowing to its properties like surface availability of functional groups, being an exceptional biosorbent it is availed as potential carrier for immobilization. For better applicability, various physio-chemical tailoring strategies have been adopted to perk up the usage. The main mechanism that works for biochar immobilization is adsorption due to high surface porosity, surface area of biochar. Further aiding to perks of adsorption being simple, cost effective and economical approach that maintains structural integrity of the enzymes. In addition to this covalent binding can vanquish the demerit enzyme leeching caused by adsorption.This review centers on various methods for production of biochar, a range of tailoring mechanisms being followed, and applicative usages of biochar immobilized enzymes in diverse processes.


Carbon earth xsoil

28 May, 2021
 

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Be a Better Gardener: Do-it-yourself biochar – Opera News

29 May, 2021
 

Contributed photoPure carbon “biochar” has attracted attention as a means of sequestering carbon in the soil and reducing the amount returned to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide by the decay of organic matter. It was purely by coincidence, but still it felt right to be speaking to Bill Taylor on Earth Day…

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Readworks developing possible solutions and biochar answer key

29 May, 2021
 

Biochar Application: Essential Soil Microbial Ecology outlines the cutting-edge research on the interactions of complex microbial populations and their functional, structural, and compositional dynamics, as well as the microbial ecology of biochar application to soil, the use of different phyto-chemical analyses, possibilities for future research, and recommendations for climate change policy. In this worksheet, students develop their algebra skills by selecting possible solutions to the given simple equation (more than one possible answer). Key stage: KS 2 Curriculum topic: Maths and Numerical Reasoning

Feb 01, 2007 · Evaluation requires an individual to make a judgment about something. We are asked to judge the value of an idea, a candidate, a work of art, or a solution to a problem. When students are engaged in decision-making and problem-solving, they should be thinking at this level. Evaluation questions do not have single right answers.

Get Answer to your question from 'The Hack Driver, Number Systems, Electricity, Math, The Proposal, Articles, Author and the Book, Development, The Rise of Nationalism in Europe, Real Numbers, Reading Comprehension, Constructions, Why Do We Fall Ill, Arithmetic Progressions' by Meritnation Experts with examples


Impact of biochar amendment on soil aggregation varied with incubation duration and biochar

29 May, 2021
 

Soil aggregation is one of the crucial processes that facilitate carbon sequestration and maintain soil fertility. So far, the effect of biochar amendment on soil aggregation remains inconclusive. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the response of soil aggregation to biochar addition varied with incubation duration and biochar chemistry. A one year microcosm experiment of soil with biochar was conducted that included biochar produced at three different temperatures (300, 450, and 600 °C), and three biochar application rates, i.e., 0, 1, and 3 wt%. It was observed that after one and three months, biochar mainly (> 90%) distributed in the micro-aggregates, and slightly reduced aggregate stability and increased proportion of micro-aggregates, which was demonstrated to result from the mechanical mixture of amended biochar with soil. Contrastingly, when the duration was prolonged to six months and one year, a significant increase in macro-aggregates (6.6–38.5%) and aggregate stability (7.3–29.4%) was detected, with the increasing extent being apparently higher for low-temperature biochar. This was related to the comparatively strong interaction of biochar particles with soil minerals or microbes after long-time incubation. The strong interaction was directly supported by the significant increase in H/C, O/C ratios of isolated biochar from treated soils, the detection of typical soil mineral elements on the surface of isolated biochar, and the increase in microbial biomass carbon of treated soils. The findings of this study highlighted the role of biochar type and amendment duration in mediating the effect of biochar application on soil aggregation.

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This research was supported by the Program for Guangdong Introducing Innovative and Enterpreneurial Teams (2019ZT08L213), Youth Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (42007013), and Guangdong Basic and Applied Basic Research Foundation (2019A1515110777).

LH original paper writing, experimenting, data analysis; BZ experimenting; LC experimenting; YF sample analysis; YY data analysis; KS experiment designing, funding acquisition.

Correspondence to Ke Sun.

The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have influenced the work reported in this paper.

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Received: 05 January 2021

Accepted: 23 April 2021

Published: 28 May 2021

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s42773-021-00097-z

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Biochar – an efficient sorption material for the removal of pharmaceutically active compounds, DNA …

29 May, 2021
 

Biochar prepared from wood and corn feedstock was tested for pharmaceuticals removal.

Van der Waals and hydrogen bindings are dominant interactions.

The best sorption efficiency of Biochar was achieved for carbamazepine, cetirizine, diclofenac.

The removal efficiency of RNA and DNA fragments in wastewater by Biochar was greater than 90%.

No effect on total and antibiotic-resistant bacteria was observed.

Biochar prepared from wood and corn feedstock was tested for pharmaceuticals removal.

Van der Waals and hydrogen bindings are dominant interactions.

The best sorption efficiency of Biochar was achieved for carbamazepine, cetirizine, diclofenac.

The removal efficiency of RNA and DNA fragments in wastewater by Biochar was greater than 90%.

No effect on total and antibiotic-resistant bacteria was observed.

Wastewaters are considered a remarkable source of micropollutants capable of influencing the environment both directly and indirectly. Here we tested porous ecological carbon (Biochar), an effective sorbent material for removing pharmaceuticals, drugs, and their metabolites found in wastewaters. The tested Biochar type was first characterised and used for adsorption experiments of selected micropollutants from a municipal WWTP (wastewater treatment plant) effluent sample. The sorption efficiency was studied on selected pharmaceuticals due to their common presence in aquatic ecosystems. The results show that the studied Biochar type removed the pharmaceuticals with high efficiency (above 90%), so this material can potentially be applied in wastewater treatment. We achieved greater than 99% efficiency in total RNA removal from wastewater. Wastewater might contain infectious RNA fragments of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. However, Biochar can be used as a sorbent in wastewater treatment to remove antibiotic resistance genes. We have also observed a total DNA removal ability of Biochar. On the other hand, the total number and antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria and enterococci were not changed after Biochar wastewater treatment.


Comparison of Heavy Metal Adsorption by Peat Moss and Peat Moss-Derived Biochar Produced …

29 May, 2021
 

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Readworks developing possible solutions and biochar answer key

29 May, 2021
 

Optimizing graphic organizers to improve students’ reading comprehension In this globalization era, English has become the important means of international communication. It plays recognizable roles in almost every society, whether large or small, across the globe. Jan 01, 2010 · Pyrolysis temperature is the most significant process parameter, carbon content of biochar inversely related to biochar yield, increasing from 56% to 93% between 300 and 800 °C in one study, while yield of biochar decreased from 67% to 26% (Okimori, et al., 2003). Beyond a certain temperature threshold, biochar yield may continue to decrease … Timeline – ReadWriteThink – ReadWriteThink
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H.R.2581 – 117th Congress (2021-2022): To establish a biochar demonstration project and biochar

29 May, 2021
 

See Coverage Dates for Legislative Information and learn about other sources.


DSpace at EWHA: Sorptive removal of selected emerging contaminants using biochar in aqueous …

29 May, 2021
 

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Biochar– and phosphate-induced immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soil and water …

29 May, 2021
 

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Characteristics of biochar: macro-molecular properties | Taylor & Francis Group

29 May, 2021
 

Chapter

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DOI link for Characteristics of biochar: macro-molecular properties

Characteristics of biochar: macro-molecular properties book

DOI link for Characteristics of biochar: macro-molecular properties

Characteristics of biochar: macro-molecular properties book

For more than a decade, researchers on all continents have been engaged in an initiative to simultaneously produce bioenergy, remove excess carbon (C) from the atmosphere and improve soil and water quality. At the center of this ‘Charcoal Vision’ (Laird, 2008) is biochar technology (Lehmann, 2007a; Lehmann and Joseph, 2009) – the attempt to design integrated agricultural biomass-bioenergy systems that build soil quality and increase productivity, while reducing atmospheric CO2 (Lehmann, 2007b).

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SERBAJADI BIOCHAR SOIL MIX 2.5KG

29 May, 2021
 

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Studies to investigate the use of biochar for CO2 removal – Fuentitech

30 May, 2021
 

The University of Nottingham is leading a £ 4.5 million trial investigating the feasibility of a material biochar for storing CO.2 From the atmosphere to fight climate change.

Study is one of five Funded by UKRI A project aimed at reducing emissions in line with the government’s 2050 net zero target using greenhouse gas removal (GGR) technology.

Biochar is produced by heating organic biomass from agricultural and forestry waste in the absence of oxygen (pyrolytic carbon) and is rich in carbon and chemically stable. Currently produced on a small scale in the UK and used as a gardening mulch, this substance is similar to the commercial grade charcoal used in barbecue, but needs to be produced at high temperatures to produce stable carbon. there is.

“The purpose is to extract carbon from atmospheric emissions and trap it in biochar,” said Colin, the project’s chief professor, director of the EPSRC Center for Carbon Capture and Storage and Cleaner Fossil Energy PhDs. Snape says.

“The carbon is trapped in the soil for centuries, if not thousands of years, so its sustainable production can be a powerful tool in the fight against climate change. However, it is necessary to have a detailed and accurate understanding of the lifespan and stability of biocarbon carbon in the soil to ensure that there are no adverse effects. “

UK sets new climate goals by law

The UK needs to invest in multiple large plants to make a significant contribution to the UK’s Net Zero goal. These plants not only generate renewable heat and electricity through the gas produced by the carbonization process, but also produce biochar.

The team will assess how much biochar can be deployed in the UK without adversely affecting the soil ecosystem. Over 200 tonnes of biochar are prepared from unused and recycled wood.

Prior to field application, the biochar will be tested at the University of Nottingham. There, Dr. Wilmeredith, an assistant professor of fuel science and technology, analyzes its properties, the stability of retained carbon, and the rate of decomposition over time.

Work begins this month (May 2021) and field tests will be conducted on cultivated and grasslands in England and Wales, as well as forests, old mines and railroad levees that have lost vegetation due to engineering work. Up to several tons of biochar per hectare are applied to investigate the effects on fertilizers, soil health, plant and microbial reactions.

“Chemical analysis reveals how much carbon applied as biochar is actually trapped in the soil over the long term and how much is returned to the atmosphere as CO.2,Dr. Meredith said. “This shows how effective the introduction of large-scale biochar is as a method of removing greenhouse gases.”

Biochar is also used where the land is contaminated with heavy metals from previous industrial applications. Biochar acts as an absorbent, binding and immobilizing metal contaminants on its surface, reducing toxicity over time.

Dr. Helen West, an environmental biologist at the University of Nottingham, monitors the project’s land composition and evaluates ways to use biochar to improve soil and increase carbon levels that may have been depleted by agricultural practices. To do.

Farmers will be key stakeholders in the project, with agricultural benefits such as preventing agricultural spills of nutrients and pesticides that can reduce water quality, reducing nitrogen loss from composting, and preventing ammonia emissions from poultry farms. We also evaluate the use of non-carbon to bring out. building.

Paul Wilson, a professor of agricultural economics and collaborator, says that industries such as aviation pay farmers to apply biochar to their fields to offset carbon emissions from air travel. He said he could consider that.

The complete research team consists of the University of Nottingham, the University of Leeds, Bangor University, the Center for Ecological and Hydrological Literature, the Forest Research, and the Scottish University Environmental Research Center, supported by various partners in the agricultural and biochar community.

https://www.theengineer.co.uk/study-to-explore-use-of-biochar-for-co2-removal/ Studies to investigate the use of biochar for CO2 removal


Biochar Sales Industry Research Report 2021. Companies Included – Cool Planet, Biochar

30 May, 2021
 

Up Market Research (UMR) published a new report entitled, “International Biochar Sales Market” is an exceptional market study that provides the hottest detailed info and extensive analysis of this market. It offers a comprehensive summary of the market with in depth insights on essential aspects such as the present market situation, possible dimensions, quantity, and dynamics of this market. This study report produces a comprehensive evaluation of the COVID-19 pandemic and its effect on the present market and assesses the potential results of the market throughout the forecast period, 2021 – 2028.

Some of the key players included in the report:

Cool Planet
Biochar Supreme
NextChar
Terra Char
Genesis Industries
Interra Energy
CharGrow
Pacific Biochar
Biochar Now
The Biochar Company (TBC)
ElementC6
Vega Biofuels

This report provides a thorough view concerning the competitive landscape of this Biochar Sales Market and carries a wide description of functionality by a number of the key Global players finishing on the market. It offers a listing of newest upgrades of several business plans including Units, and collaborations embraced from these significant international players. The report Provides a very clear picture seeing R&D investment in key players and Adoption of advanced technologies to expand their customer base and enlarge the Present competitive place. Information concerning the position, reach of expansion, and chances of new Entrants or players on the market.

Get Free Exclusive Sample Report: https://www.upmarketresearch.com/request-sample/57379

The report provides a comprehensive analysis of these market segments and sub-segments using a transparent explanation of that segment is predicted to dominate the market throughout the forecast period.

To aid clients in coming informed decision regarding their enterprise investment strategies and strategies of this market, the report gives a extensive details concerning the operation of regional markets and competitions analysis. The report analyses the newest profiles and development of the significant international players competing on the market to know their rankings and expansion capability.

Segments Insight:

The global Biochar Sales market is divided into :

Wood Source Biochar
Corn Stove Source Biochar
Rice Stove Source Biochar
Wheat Stove Source Biochar
Other Stove Source Biochar

The report includes Key insights concerning segments and sub-segments of this market. It covers a comprehensive information concerning the operation and market evaluation of each segment together with the anticipated CAGR including a variety of sub-segments of this market throughout the forecast period. Also, the report provides insight about key driving variables which help expand the segment in addition to significant challenges that may hamper the development of segments during the projected period to comprehend the crystal-clear image of the total expansion extent of this market.

Buy the Complete Report: https://upmarketresearch.com/report/biochar-sales-market-global-industry-analysis

Applications

The global Biochar Sales market is categorized into

Soil Conditioner
Fertilizer
Others

The report lists a wide selection of applications of Biochar Sales and addresses the significant businesses that broadly use the product due to their respective applications. A detailed explanation is given in the report concerning the regions of applications describing where the item is embraced by key businesses to leverage their company portfolio. Additionally, it supplies information about variables that help enlarge market range of a number of the essential applications, their earnings share of every application, and also their segment parameters to comprehend that an entire sense of this segment.

Regional Analysis

The global Biochar Sales market is classified as

Asia Pacific

Europe

North America

Latin America

Middle East & Africa

This study moreover, the report contains a wide evaluation of that sub-regions and states within a region, which can be predicted to control the regional market throughout the forecast period. The report offers vital information regarding socioeconomic and political aspects which could help determine the overall functionality and expansion rate of their various regional markets. A special chapter is booked from the report for its COVID-19 outbreak and its effects on the regional market and further clarifies how this outbreak is projected to affect consumers’ behaviour of this Biochar Sales market in the next several years. The report also focuses on elaborating the functions and impacts of their current regional commerce regulations and federal policies & policies which may either boost or interfere with the regional market growth.

For any enquiry: https://www.upmarketresearch.com/enquiry-before-buying/57379

Some Major TOC Points:

Chapter 1. Report Overview

Chapter 2. Global Growth Trends

Chapter 3. Market Share by Key Players

Chapter 4. Breakdown Data by Type and Application

Chapter 5. Market by End Users/Application

Chapter 6. COVID-19 Outbreak: Biochar Sales Industry Impact

Chapter 7. Opportunity Analysis in Covid-19 Crisis

Chapter 8. Market Driving Force

And Many More…

Reason To Buy:

Contact Info –
UpMarketResearch
Name – Alex Mathews
Email[email protected]
Website – https://www.upmarketresearch.com
Address – 500 East E Street, Ontario, CA 91764, United States.


Effects of biochar and TUAT-1 bio-inoculant on grain yield and nitrogen efficiency of forage rice …

30 May, 2021
 

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In-Situ Architect

31 May, 2021
 

Come build an architectural gem and develop a seed orchard atop a climate change resilient landscape in northwestern BC. 

Minimum Length of Assignment: July – December 2021 (with strong possibility for extension) – starting date flexible for the right person

Work with us in three areas:

1. Owner-Builder Led Residence: We are a family of three – architect, poet and 9-year old – who relocated from Toronto to work on climate change mitigation through ecological restoration. Your primary role will be to design and finish the innovative interior of the residence, which overlooks the extraordinary Stekyoden Peak. 

2. Seed Facility Headquarters: Work with Seed the North in its mandate to collect and process wild-stand seed from biodiverse landscapes, which will be coated with biochar and aerially disseminated using drones. You will design and build our seed facilities, where a lot of our work is based. 

3. Cottonwood Cabin: Complete and execute designs for this cabin built from the timbers of a single cottonwood, which was felled and hewn on site this past spring. The cabin will house Indigenous elders, scientists, and poets who visit Seed the North to advise on their seed collection and dispersal activity. 

Who we are: 

Hardworking, creative, open-minded, skill and craft focused, thoughtful, and collaborative

Maintain a regional character that values a strong connection to the land where we work 

Neutral, inclusive, non-judgemental

Dog friendly

Not 420 friendly 

Who you are: 

Hardworking, creative, passionate about design, building construction, and the natural environment

Enjoy working on unusual projects with an innovative approach to unconventional ideas 

Flexible and able to switch priorities to handle the rigour of working on a small team with multiple scopes

Enjoy spending time in the outdoors

Happy to work in a unique open-air office space that overlooks the job site

Description: 

Detailed design of house interior, including but not limited to cabinetry, custom furniture, lighting, old-school plaster, and lath

Project management and procurement

Work closely with local vendors, mills, and subcontractors

Hands-on contribution to construction in executing design drawings

Prepare 3D models 

Research and order construction materials

Follow passive solar and passivehouse design aspirations using natural and innovative performance materials

Find creative solutions using locally available materials

Complete assigned administrative tasks (letters, reports, spreadsheets, schedules, etc.)

Foster a collaborative environment where the crew functions as a team, and keep morale high

Qualifications: 

Post-Secondary degree in Architecture or Building Sciences 

Minimum 5 years’ experience in an architecture office and/or construction site

Deeply connected to drawing-to-executing process

Proficient in Rhino and/or AutoCad

Confident with both designing and specifying all materials, fasteners, tools, etc.

Finishing carpentry experience a plus 

Able to do material take-offs

Able to self-edit and receive constructive critique

Interest in design culture and the larger purpose of architecture

Valid class 5 driver’s license and own vehicle

A proactive Covid-responsible attitude

Benefits

Generous salary commensurate with experience + all supplies

Opportunities and resources for professional development

Potential for merit bonus contingent on performance

In keeping with our commitment to cultivate a diverse and inclusive workplace, we encourage applications from members of groups that have been historically disadvantaged and marginalized, including First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples, Indigenous peoples of North America, racialized persons, persons with disabilities, and 2SLGBTQ+ persons.

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Influences of modified biochar on metal bioavailability, metal uptake by wheat seedlings (Triticum …

31 May, 2021
 

Modified biochar (BCM) significantly reduced activity of metals in the soil.

BCM inhibited the uptake of metals by wheat seedlings.

BCM improved soil properties and increased soil enzyme activity.

BCM decreased soil bacterial diversity and changed the soil bacterial community.

Modified biochar (BCM) significantly reduced activity of metals in the soil.

BCM inhibited the uptake of metals by wheat seedlings.

BCM improved soil properties and increased soil enzyme activity.

BCM decreased soil bacterial diversity and changed the soil bacterial community.

A 6 weeks pot culture experiment was carried out to investigate the stabilization effects of a modified biochar (BCM) on metals in contaminated soil and the uptake of these metals by wheat seedlings. The results showed that the application of BCM significantly increased the soil fertility, the biomass of wheat seedling roots increased by more than 50%, and soil dehydrogenase (DHA) and catalase (CAT) activities increased by 369.23% and 12.61%, respectively. In addition, with the application of BCM, the diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid extractable (DTPA-extractable) Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn in soil were reduced from 2.34 to 0.38 mg/kg, from 49.27 to 25.65 mg/kg, from 3.55 mg/kg to below the detection limit and from 4.05 to 3.55 mg/kg, respectively. Correspondingly, the uptake of these metals in wheat roots and shoots decreased by 62.43% and 79.83% for Cd, 73.21% and 66.32% for Pb, 57.98% and 68.92% for Cu, and 40.42% and 43.66% for Zn. Furthermore, BCM application decreased the abundance and alpha diversity of soil bacteria and changed the soil bacterial community structure dramatically. Overall, BCM has great potential for the remediation of metal-contaminated soils, but its long-term impact on soil metals and biota need further research.


Long-term effects of biochar amendment on soil aggregate stability and biological binding agents …

31 May, 2021
 

Increase in biochar dose increased contents of small macroaggregates.

Soil aggregate stability decreased in 47.25 t ha−1 compared to lower doses.

Biochar contents was higher in macroaggregates than microaggregate.

Structural equation model showing the potential mechanisms in soil aggregation.

Increase in biochar dose increased contents of small macroaggregates.

Soil aggregate stability decreased in 47.25 t ha−1 compared to lower doses.

Biochar contents was higher in macroaggregates than microaggregate.

Structural equation model showing the potential mechanisms in soil aggregation.

The use of biochar as soil amendment might improve the soil structure and carbon sequestration. However, few studies have focused on the effects of biochar doses on soil aggregates in brown earth. A six-year field experiment was conducted from May 2013 to October 2018. Four biochar doses were tested: 0, 15.75, 31.5, and 47.25 t ha−1 (control, BC1, BC2, and BC3, respectively). The objective of this study was to explore the effects of different biochar doses on soil biological binding agents (soil organic carbon (SOC), glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC)). The ignition method was used to analyze the biochar content within different aggregate fractions. Biochar was applied before sowing in the first year of this experiment, and mineral fertilizer was applied to all treatments every year before sowing. All biochar treatments increased small macroaggregates (0.25–2 mm) and the soil aggregate stability, as reflected by the MWD (mean weight diameter), GMD (geometric mean diameter) and R>0.25mm (proportions of macroaggregates). The aggregate stability increased with increasing biochar dose and then decreased in the BC3 treatment. All biochar treatments increased the SOC content within macroaggregates. Biochar contents increased with the biochar dosage in all soil aggregate fractions except the microaggregate fraction. Biochar increased the amount of biological binding agents and the soil pH; electrical conductivity (EC); cation exchange capacity (CEC); exchangeable K+, Na+ and Mg2+ levels. Structural equation modeling revealed that biochar enhanced SOC first; SOC influenced the small macroaggregate fraction and silt and clay fraction indirectly via MBC, easily extractable glomalin-related soil proteins (GRSPe) and exchangeable Mg2+. However, the reason why the MWD decreased in the BC3 treatment was not clear. Therefore, the use of biochar as a soil amendment might improve the soil structure under a suitable application dose, but the underlying mechanism still requires further research.


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