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Biomass-Based Carbon Removal – The Impact Newsletter

1 November, 2021
 

Carbon sequestration as a concept has captured the imagination (and invited criticism from skeptics) for some time now. Those words may invoke the highly engineered image of pulling CO2 out of the air and pumping it underground via direct air capture, or purchasing swaths of forests to store CO2 through the carbon cycle.

Here, we’ll focus on biomass based carbon removal. On a basic level, this means that biomass, typically waste biomass, is converted through some process into a more stable form. If this process did not occur, the biomass would produce CO2 over time either through decomposition, burning, or other processes, so converting it to this more stable form at least delays the conversion of organic matter to greenhouse gases.

Waste biomass -> process (pyrolysis) -> CO2 removal by stabilizing biomass as biochar, bio-oil, etc.

Before diving into the impact of these technologies, let’s walk through some principles for evaluating carbon offset projects in general. Some core concepts according to Carbon Direct are additionality, durability/permanence, leakage, reliability of accounting methods, and negative impacts/externalities (“do no harm”). You may encounter different terminology used to describe similar concepts.

Additionality: means that the carbon removal would not have occurred without the purchase of those credits. One example: if a credit for some portion of  forest was purchased, but it had already been preserved long before, is the purchase really resulting in additional impact?

Durability:
How likely will the carbon be re-released into the atmosphere. For example, a forest in a zone that frequently experiences wildfires would be considered less durable than a forest in an area without that same risk. Permanence is another word that describes this attribute.

Leakage:
This term simply means that the emissions haven’t been displaced to another location. For example: if deforestation is prevented at one location, the demand for timber may result in deforestation occurring elsewhere.

Accounting methods:
This primarily means 1) how the impact of the projects are quantified upfront and 2) how this impact is monitored over time. In particular, whether the quantification is repeatable, verifiable, and with known + conservative uncertainty estimates is critical. In addition to having stringent accounting methods, many platforms opt to have third party verification of carbon removal processes (here’s an interview with Puro.earth and Energy Link Services, an auditor describing the auditing process)

Negative impacts:
Hypothetical example of a negative impact: a carbon removal program that dramatically degrades air quality for nearby communities.

So what is the promise of biochar or bio-oil based carbon removal from an impact perspective? The rosiest picture might look like the following scenario: Agricultural waste, which often would have otherwise been burned, is converted through pyrolysis to biochar. This results in negative emissions for hundreds of years while producing a soil additive that improves the drought and pest tolerance of plants. Not to mention the local air quality improvements in agricultural communities or a potential revenue stream for an otherwise troublesome waste product. This is a scenario that biochar advocates will promote, and at face value, seems almost too good to be true. So let’s dig a bit deeper!

Let’s start by considering the impact of this technology from a carbon removal perspective, with a focus on biochar production. Additionality is easier to prove for waste biomass, and one protocol requires that projects involve biomass that would’ve been burned, left to decompose, or landfilled for it to count as additional. For biochar production, about half the carbon embodied in biomass is emitted in the production process, while the other half that would have decomposed over a few decades is stabilized with a durability of hundreds of years. Leakage seems irrelevant in this scenario, as the processing of some waste biomass shouldn’t displace the production of waste biomass elsewhere. As for accounting methods – this is also highly variable based on the degree to which carbon removal is the primary product offering for a given company. For a more in-depth look, here
 are the criteria that Microsoft and Carbon Direct use as criteria for carbon accounting, including a specific callout for biomass-based sources.

In terms of negative externalities with respect to biochar, a literature review from Brtnicky et al highlights potential negative side effects (impacts on earthworms, the fungi: bacteria balance in soils, and erosion/water retention properties depending on the soil type), and a general need to holistically consider how biochar might interact with a specific type of soil. There is also the possibility of particulate matter impacts from production or from soil application, which diminishes the potential benefit of avoiding crop burning. There is likely more to be learned on this front given the lack of large scale studies on biochar to date.

With that said, research suggests that biochar is generally beneficial for improving water retention, soil health, as well as removing pollutants. Biochar seems to be most effective in soils that are poor or contaminated, which has attracted (at least as of a few years ago) heightened interest from China as a tool to remediate soils, divert agricultural waste which would have been burned, and improve crop yields beyond what chemical fertilizers are capable of. 

On the bio-oil front, if stored underground the durability can be on the order of thousands of years. There are potential applications for bio-oil conversion to hydrogen fuel/syngas that the startup Charm Industrial is exploring — these are still carbon negative, though the emissions reduction potential would be impacted by this additional processing.

Perhaps the most common criticism of carbon removal initiatives as a whole is that they distract us from known interventions to reduce our impact (e.g. electrification, renewable energy). Consequently, if carbon removal is to scale, it must do so with high-quality offsets, and without negatively impacting existing efforts. 

In summary – technologies that convert waste biomass to biochar/bio-oil and remove carbon in the process may be incredibly compelling as a means to solve several environmental challenges at once. However, these technologies are not a monolith – variations in the feedstock, the processing, and the application (if applicable) of the end product can make a big difference in how impactful this is from a carbon removal perspective and beyond. 

Next up – we’ll explore how it works from a technology perspective. Lastly, we’ll take a look at the business case and challenges associated with this space. 

———
Many thanks to 
Katie Holligan from Charm Industrial, Kevin Kung from Takachar, and Tim Preisenhammer from Carbo Culture.

GTM Operations & Enablement @ Instrumental Inc.

Christina is currently the Sales and Marketing Operations Manager at Instrumental Inc, a manufacturing optimization platform seeking to help electronics manufacturers build products better and with less wasted time/materials. Her professional background is in energy efficiency, with roles in operations and business development at Carbon Lighthouse, following an academic background in environmental engineering inspired by reading “Cradle to Cradle” in high school. She currently volunteers with the San Francisco Beacon Initiative, and is an avid enthusiast of hip hop / house dance, the outdoors, and good food.

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Tailoring Biochar for Persulfate-based Environmental Catalysis: Impact of Biomass …

1 November, 2021
 

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Tailoring Biochar for Persulfate-based Environmental Catalysis: Impact of Biomass … – X-MOL

1 November, 2021
 

Biochar, a carbonaceous material with engineering potential, has gained attention as an efficient catalyst in persulfate-based advanced oxidation processes (PS-AOPs). Although biomass feedstocks are known as a critical factor for the performance of biochar, the relationship between the catalytic efficiency/mechanism and the types of biomass feedstocks is still unclear. Thus, according to recent advances in experimental and theoretical researches, this paper provides a systematic review of the properties of biochar, and the relationship between catalytic performance in PS-AOPs and biomass feedstocks, where the differences in physicochemical properties (surface properties, pore structure, etc.) and activation path of different sourced biochars, are introduced. In addition, how the tailoring of biochar (such as heteroatomic doping and co-pyrolysis of biomass) affects its activation efficiency and mechanism in PS-AOPs is summarized. Finally, the suitable application scenarios or systems of different sourced biochars, appropriate methods to improve the catalytic performance of different types of biochar and the prospects and challenges for the development of biochar in PS-AOPs are proposed.

生物炭是一种具有工程潜力的碳质材料,作为基于过硫酸盐的高级氧化工艺 (PS-AOP) 的有效催化剂而受到关注。尽管生物质原料被认为是生物炭性能的关键因素,但催化效率/机理与生物质原料类型之间的关系仍不清楚。因此,根据实验和理论研究的最新进展,本文系统综述了生物炭的性质,以及 PS-AOPs 和生物质原料的催化性能之间的关系,其中物理化学性质(表面性质、孔结构)的差异,等等。) 和不同来源生物炭的激活路径。此外,总结了生物炭的定制(如生物质的杂原子掺杂和共热解)如何影响其在 PS-AOP 中的活化效率和机制。最后,提出了不同来源生物炭的合适应用场景或体系、提高不同类型生物炭催化性能的适当方法以及生物炭在PS-AOPs中的发展前景和挑战。


Biochar Market Expected to Witness the Highest Growth during 2021-2028 With :Ambient …

1 November, 2021
 

Biochar Market is making at a High CAGR during the check time interval 2021-2028.

The wide ranging Biochar report endows with an in-depth investigation of the market driving factors, opportunities, restraints, and challenges for obtaining the crucial insight of the ABC industry. Associations are significantly relying upon the different sections covered in the measurable studying report which gives better encounters to drive the business into right bearing. The investigation and examination mainly incorporates relentless survey, creation, information assessment, applications, and region adroit examination, competitor scene, use and pay study, cost structure assessment, esteem appraisal, and pay analysis to 2028. In the triumphant Biochar market report, complete market is separated by organization, by country, and by application or by type for the cutthroat scene investigation

Get a Sample Copy of the Report@ https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/request-a-sample/?dbmr=global-biochar-market

Key Players:  Cool Planet, Pacific Biochar Benefit Corporation, Genesis Industries, LLC, CharGrow USA LLC, Black Owl Biochar, Phoenix Energy Group, Airex Énergie Inc., Ambient Energy LLC, Avello Bioenergy, ETIA Group, CharGrow USA LLC, Pyrocal Pty Ltd, Terra Humana Ltd, American BioChar Company, Bioforcetech Corporation, ECOERA Millennium Biochar and Carbon Emission Removal Service, Biochar Now, llc., EkoBalans Fenix, Carbo Culture, GreenBack Pte Ltd

The final report will add the analysis of the Impact of Covid-19 in this report Biochar Market.

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A portion of the organizations contending in the Biochar Market are:

The North American region accounted for the largest share in the global Biochar market. The associations are unendingly redesigning the overall business cycles to fulfill the customers’ requirements in the best way. A couple of local and overall associations have a strong footing in the North American area

Worldwide Biochar Market Research Report 2027 conveys inside and out contextual analyses on the different nations which are engaged with the Biochar Market. The report is separated by utilize any spot material and the report offers this information for each huge country and affiliations. It offers an assessment of the particular checks, various issues, and cost-practicality impacting the market. Huge substance analyzed and inspected in the report join market size, action situation, and current and future progression examples of the market, market parts, business improvement, and usage tendencies. Additionally, the report joins the summary of huge associations/competitors and their resistance data that helps the customer with choosing their current circumstance keeping watch and go to therapeutic lengths to keep up with or increment their portion holds.

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Viral pathogens in urban stormwater runoff: Occurrence and removal via vegetated biochar

1 November, 2021
 

Urban runoff is one of the greatest sources of microbial pollution to surface waters. Biofilters can limit the impact of stormwater runoff on surface water quality by diverting runoff from receiving waters. However, our understanding of how biofilter design choices, including the addition of vegetation and geomedia, may impact the removal of pathogens is lacking. In this study, we characterized viruses (adenovirus, enterovirus, norovirus GII, crAssphage) in San Francisco Bay area urban runoff and assessed the removal of lab-cultured viruses (MS2, adenovirus 2, coxsackievirus B5) from biochar-amended biofilter mesocosms during challenge testing. We quantified viruses using (RT-)qPCR and F+ coliphage plaque assays. We found that all the pathogenic viruses targeted were found at low concentrations (adenovirus: all positive samples were <limit of quantification, enterovirus: <limit of quantification-1.9 × 102 gc/L, norovirus GII: <limit of quantification-1.2 × 102 gc/L) in San Francisco Bay area urban runoff and the presence of norovirus GII in runoff was associated with developed land use and decreased precipitation. Biofilters had variable success in removing adenovirus, enterovirus, and MS2 from runoff in laboratory-scale column experiments. In addition, there was no significant difference in the removal of each virus in vegetated versus non-vegetated biofilters, with the exception of MS2 which had slightly higher removal in vegetated biofilters (0.40 log10 units, Welch’s t-test, p=0.004). When comparing removal of human viruses and viral indicators, adenovirus and enterovirus were removed more efficiently (log10-removal adenovirus = 3.2; log10-removal enterovirus = 1.1) than indicator virus MS2 (log10-removal by RT-qPCR = 0.36, log10-removal by plaque assay = 0.36). These results provide evidence that MS2 may be a conservative indicator for human virus removal in biofiltration systems, but more work is needed to examine this relationship. Results from this study can help inform design choices regarding biofilters intended to improve water quality and our understanding of virus attenuation in biofiltration systems.

城市径流是地表水微生物污染的最大来源之一。生物过滤器可以通过分流受纳水域的径流来限制雨水径流对地表水质量的影响。然而,我们对生物过滤器设计选择(包括添加植被和地理介质)可能如何影响病原体去除的了解尚缺乏。在这项研究中,我们对旧金山湾区城市径流中的病毒(腺病毒、肠道病毒、诺如病毒 GII、crAssphage)进行了表征,并评估了在挑战期间从生物炭修正的生物过滤器中胚层中去除实验室培养病毒(MS2、腺病毒 2、柯萨奇病毒 B5)的情况测试。我们使用 (RT-)qPCR 和 F+ 大肠杆菌噬菌斑测定对病毒进行量化。我们发现所有靶向的病原病毒都在低浓度(腺病毒​​:所有阳性样本<2 gc/L,诺如病毒 GII:< 量化极限 – 1.2 × 10 2 gc/L) 在旧金山湾区城市径流中,径流中诺如病毒 GII 的存在与土地利用发达和降水减少有关。在实验室规模的柱实验中,生物过滤器在从径流中去除腺病毒、肠道病毒和 MS2 方面取得了不同程度的成功。此外,除了 MS2 在有植被的生物过滤器中去除率略高(0.40 log 10单位,Welch t 检验,p=0.004)外,在有植被的生物过滤器与无植被的生物过滤器中,每种病毒的去除率没有显着差异。. 在比较人类病毒和病毒指标的去除情况时,腺病毒和肠道病毒的去除效率更高(log 10-去除腺病毒 = 3.2;log10 –去除肠道病毒 = 1.1) 比指示病毒 MS2 (log 10 – 通过 RT-qPCR 去除 = 0.36, log 10 – 通过斑块测定去除 = 0.36)。这些结果提供了证据,表明 MS2 可能是生物过滤系统中人类病毒去除的保守指标,但需要做更多的工作来检验这种关系。这项研究的结果可以帮助告知有关旨在改善水质的生物过滤器的设计选择以及我们对生物过滤系统中病毒衰减的理解。


Browsing Faculty of Engineering and Technology by Subject "Biochar" – Busitema University

1 November, 2021
 

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Let's Turn Ag States Into Carbon Sinks – ACOEL

1 November, 2021
 

Posted on November 1, 2021 by Chuck Becker

One of my favorite movies is The Graduate. There is a scene in that 1968 film where Ben (Dustin Hoffman) is getting advice about his future from Mr. McGuire. Mr. McGuire takes Ben aside and says, in a conspiratorial tone, “I just want to say one word to you—PLASTICS.” It’s a great scene made tragic by the fact that it was prescient (plastic generation in the United States went from 2.9 million tons in 1970 to over 35.7 million tons in 2018).

If the scene were shot today, Mr. McGuire would say: “I just want to say one word to  you—BIOCHAR.”

Biomass-derived charcoal, or “biochar,” is charcoal that is made when biomass is heated in the absence of oxygen – a process called pyrolysis.  Another way of saying it is that biochar is produced when wood chips, manure, sludges, compost and green waste are burned under controlled conditions. The big difference between charcoal (like what is produced in a forest fire) and biochar, is that almost all of the CO2 of the biomass gets bound up in the biochar.  Thus, biochar effectively sequesters carbon in the biomass (as long as the biochar is not burned). A significant side benefit, however, is that it is a soil amendment that produces healthier soil, bigger yields, lower acidity and better water retention.  The resulting charcoal can cut greenhouse emissions from waste and boost soil fertility.  It has the added benefit of reducing the need for chemical and manure fertilizers as well as absorbing heavy metals and agricultural chemicals.  It is easily applied to farmland and can endure in the soil for thousands of years.

I know what you’re saying – “Chuck, where can I get me some of this miracle product?” Well, of course, there’s the rub.  Like so many ideas that are good for the environment, cost is the killer.  Although the technology to create biochar is not new, it isn’t cheap.  There are experimental examples that have been operational for several years and the fine tuning continues.  But there is reason for optimism.

Why? Allow me to digress for a moment.  Municipal solid waste (MSW) continues to be a significant problem, particularly in the United States, and disposal costs real money. We produce waste at the rate of 4.9 pounds of trash per person, per day – higher per capita than any other country. Of that amount, about half is landfilled, one-third is recycled and the remainder is burned for energy recovery.  In the United States, the waste stream consists of: food residue – 15%; wood waste – 6%; paper – 27% yard trimmings – 14%; rubber, leather, textiles – 9% plastics – 13%, metals – 9%; glass – 4%; and other – 3%. That means just about 70% of the MSW stream could be used to produce biochar. 

So what happens when the two are combined?  Specifically, what if we can reduce the volume of MSW and provide a source for the biochar ingredients at the same time? Imagine you want to make a widget. What if the cost of the raw materials to make the widget was zero?  Better yet, what if people would actually pay you to take the raw materials you need from them and even deliver the materials to you free of charge?  This could work with biochar.  In its simplest form, a city might pay a biochar company a dollar amount per ton of municipal waste delivered to the company rather than the city paying a tipping fee at a landfill. This almost eliminates the waste stream to the landfill (a small percentage of the pyrolysis process ends up at the landfill) and provides the company with its raw materials at a negative cost. Indeed, under the right circumstance, cities could “mine” their Mount Trashmores and send the materials to the company for processing into biochar. The biochar would then be sold to farmers as a soil amendment that would not only improve yields, but would sequester the carbon in, potentially, millions of acres of farmland.

Obviously this isn’t meant to be a deep dive into biochar. Rather, think of it as Mr. McGuire whispering in your ear.  Any product that sequesters carbon, replaces fertilizer, improves soils and reduces landfill usage is worth a hard look. 

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Eshani Jha, Stockholm Junior Water Prize Winner | WaterWorld

2 November, 2021
 

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Let's Turn Ag States Into Carbon Sinks | (ACOEL) | American College of Environmental Lawyers

2 November, 2021
 

One of my favorite movies is The Graduate. There is a scene in that 1968 film where Ben (Dustin Hoffman) is getting advice about his future from Mr. McGuire. Mr. McGuire takes Ben aside and says, in a conspiratorial tone, “I just want to say one word to you—PLASTICS.” It’s a great scene made tragic by the fact that it was prescient (plastic generation in the United States went from 2.9 million tons in 1970 to over 35.7 million tons in 2018).

If the scene were shot today, Mr. McGuire would say: “I just want to say one word to  you—BIOCHAR.”

Biomass-derived charcoal, or “biochar,” is charcoal that is made when biomass is heated in the absence of oxygen – a process called pyrolysis.  Another way of saying it is that biochar is produced when wood chips, manure, sludges, compost and green waste are burned under controlled conditions. The big difference between charcoal (like what is produced in a forest fire) and biochar, is that almost all of the CO2 of the biomass gets bound up in the biochar.  Thus, biochar effectively sequesters carbon in the biomass (as long as the biochar is not burned). A significant side benefit, however, is that it is a soil amendment that produces healthier soil, bigger yields, lower acidity and better water retention.  The resulting charcoal can cut greenhouse emissions from waste and boost soil fertility.  It has the added benefit of reducing the need for chemical and manure fertilizers as well as absorbing heavy metals and agricultural chemicals.  It is easily applied to farmland and can endure in the soil for thousands of years.

I know what you’re saying – “Chuck, where can I get me some of this miracle product?” Well, of course, there’s the rub.  Like so many ideas that are good for the environment, cost is the killer.  Although the technology to create biochar is not new, it isn’t cheap.  There are experimental examples that have been operational for several years and the fine tuning continues.  But there is reason for optimism.

Why? Allow me to digress for a moment.  Municipal solid waste (MSW) continues to be a significant problem, particularly in the United States, and disposal costs real money. We produce waste at the rate of 4.9 pounds of trash per person, per day – higher per capita than any other country. Of that amount, about half is landfilled, one-third is recycled and the remainder is burned for energy recovery.  In the United States, the waste stream consists of: food residue – 15%; wood waste – 6%; paper – 27% yard trimmings – 14%; rubber, leather, textiles – 9% plastics – 13%, metals – 9%; glass – 4%; and other – 3%. That means just about 70% of the MSW stream could be used to produce biochar. 

So what happens when the two are combined?  Specifically, what if we can reduce the volume of MSW and provide a source for the biochar ingredients at the same time? Imagine you want to make a widget. What if the cost of the raw materials to make the widget was zero?  Better yet, what if people would actually pay you to take the raw materials you need from them and even deliver the materials to you free of charge?  This could work with biochar.  In its simplest form, a city might pay a biochar company a dollar amount per ton of municipal waste delivered to the company rather than the city paying a tipping fee at a landfill. This almost eliminates the waste stream to the landfill (a small percentage of the pyrolysis process ends up at the landfill) and provides the company with its raw materials at a negative cost. Indeed, under the right circumstance, cities could “mine” their Mount Trashmores and send the materials to the company for processing into biochar. The biochar would then be sold to farmers as a soil amendment that would not only improve yields, but would sequester the carbon in, potentially, millions of acres of farmland.

Obviously this isn’t meant to be a deep dive into biochar. Rather, think of it as Mr. McGuire whispering in your ear.  Any product that sequesters carbon, replaces fertilizer, improves soils and reduces landfill usage is worth a hard look. 

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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Biochar restructures plant–soil–microbe relationships in a woody cropping system – DukeSpace

2 November, 2021
 

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Charcoal production changes Tjiho's life …generational farmer turns the page – New Era Newspaper

2 November, 2021
 

Mbati Tjiho is a generational farmer who traded in his 25-year office job to explore his passion for farming in 2017 on Farm Winnie, which was a predominant livestock production farm, close to Outjo in the Kunene region. 

Tjiho has seen first-hand the impact of bush encroachment on his family farm. 

“Some farms in my area have much more grass than our farm. Our farm was overgrazed and encroached. Today, the grass doesn’t grow that high, but it is something I am correcting.”

 Tjiho explains: “I realised that there is an opportunity in the farming industry, with the encroaching bush in Namibia. It is a huge problem for livestock grazing. Some people have even started adding value to the bush either through charcoal production, firewood production, or biochar and many other products. The reason why I embarked on bush thinning was to improve the grazing capacity of the farmland.

 “When I started farming, my father was doing some charcoal production, but I didn’t know how big the production should be for it to be profitable. Unfortunately, my father passed away at the end of 2017 and I had to take over the operations of the farm. At the beginning of 2018, I became a member of N-BiG,” explained Tjiho, referring to the Namibia Biomass Industry Group (N-BiG), a support organisation to the Namibian biomass industry.

 “With their assistance, we assessed the vegetation composition. We did the calculations per hectare as well as for the overall farm and concluded that there is a lot that I can do. However, I didn’t have much experience then, so I had to knock on different doors in the industry. I also became a member of the Namibia Charcoal Association (NCA).    

 “When I took over from my father, the production was very small. My father had 12 kilns; this would produce enough to supply two to three trucks per year. I used my savings to acquire more and push our numbers to 30 kilns.”

 

 Sound environmental practices

 Charcoal is an essential export commodity and the demand is rising globally. Namibia ranks among the top 10 charcoal exporting countries. As Tjiho explains, he quickly realised that the real driver of the charcoal industry today is the demand for quality products.

 “I realised the issue of demand and the requirements of the customers where the products are being sold, especially in Europe, the customers are conscious about their products. They need to meet environmental and social standards. This was when I first heard about FSC,” said Tjiho.

 There are policies and standards in place to ensure sustainability and environmentally sound practices define the charcoal industry in Namibia. One such gold standard of quality environmentally practices is that of FSC certification. The Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC) promotes responsible management of the world’s forests, by allowing consumers a way to identify and then, with their purchase, products that are derived using responsible, fair and sustainable practices.

 For this, FSC sets standards and provides a system for certification of organisations that want to market their products as FSC certified.

 Namibia has 1,6 million hectares of FSC certified area with approximately 320 landowners/managers. For a supplier to become FSC certified, they would need to meet certain principles and requirements including social aspects by providing quality living and safe workspaces, as well as sound environmental practices by ensuring only encroaching species are removed or harvested and that this is done sustainably.

 

 Becoming FSC certified

“Becoming an NCA member opened this door for me. The association was very instrumental in assisting me with the necessary steps for certification.” Tjiho said there are requirements that a producer must first meet to become FSC certified. For example, “things like protective clothing, having first aid kits, housing and some ablution facilities, training the workers, putting physical structures in place, meeting places and so on.”

 Housing for workers is another requirement to become FSC certified. As Tjiho stated, he always wanted a sustainable approach to his business and becoming FSC certified, “just fast-tracked my plan.”

 “Even in the Forestry Act of Namibia, requirements are saying you shouldn’t cut down protected trees, and you can cut problematic trees such as encroachers. So, FSC compliments and ensures that we comply with our national regulations and laws. This is very important.”

 Tjiho noted that initially, it helped his process to be part of a group scheme together with CMO, especially in securing buyer markets, however, this didn’t mean that he could sit back.

 “Wherever you go in life, you will find challenges. You just need to come up with mitigating measures to overcome those challenges. I’m looking forward to improving and growing even more.”

-De-bushing Advisory Service (DAS)

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2 November, 2021
 

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Serious About Reducing Carbon In The Air – Need To Know This – New Energy and Fuel

2 November, 2021
 

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A University of New South Wales (UNSW) study found biochar can boost crop yields in poor soils and help stop the effects of climate change. That follows an international review involving UNSW that found a product made from urban, agriculture and forestry waste has the added benefit of reducing the carbon footprint of modern farming.

Visiting Professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering at UNSW Science, Stephen Joseph, says the study published in GCB Bioenergy provides strong evidence that biochar can contribute to climate change mitigation.

Prof. Joseph explained, “Biochar can draw down carbon from the atmosphere into the soil and store it for hundreds to thousands of years. This study also found that biochar helps build organic carbon in soil by up to 20 per cent (average 3.8 per cent) and can reduce nitrous oxide emissions from soil by 12 to 50 per cent, which increases the climate change mitigation benefits of biochar.”

The findings are supported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s recent Special Report on Climate Change and Land, which estimated there was important climate change mitigation potential available through biochar.

“The intergovernmental panel found that globally, biochar could mitigate between 300 million to 660 million tonnes of carbon dioxide per year by 2050,” Prof. Joseph said. “Compare that to Australia’s emissions last year – an estimated 499 million tonnes of carbon dioxide – and you can see that biochar can absorb a lot of emissions. We just need a will to develop and use it.”

Biochar is the product of heating biomass residues such as wood chips, animal manures, sludges, compost and green waste, in an oxygen-starved environment – during a process called pyrolysis. The result is stable charcoal which can cut greenhouse emissions, while boosting soil fertility.

The GCB Bioenergystudy reviewed approximately 300 papers including 33 meta-analyses that examined many of the 14,000 biochar studies that have been published over the last 20 years.

Prof. Joseph continued, “It (GCB study) found average crop yields increased from 10 to 42 per cent, concentrations of heavy metals in plant tissue were reduced by 17 to 39 per cent and phosphorus availability to plants increased too. Biochar helps plants resist environmental stresses, such as diseases, and helps plants tolerate toxic metals, water stress and organic compounds such as the herbicide atrazine.”

The study details for the first time how biochar improves the root zone of a plant. In the first three weeks, as biochar reacts with the soil it can stimulate seed germination and seedling growth. During the next six months, reactive surfaces are created on biochar particles, improving nutrient supply to plants. After three to six months, biochar starts to ‘age’ in the soil and forms microaggregates that protect organic matter from decomposition.

Prof. Joseph said the study found the greatest responses to biochar were in acidic and sandy soils where biochar had been applied together with fertilizer. “We found the positive effects of biochar were dose dependent and also dependent on matching the properties of the biochar to soil constraints and plant nutrient requirements,” Prof. Joseph said. “Plants, particularly in low-nutrient, acidic soils common in the tropics and humid subtropics, such as the north coast of NSW and Queensland, could significantly benefit from biochar. “Sandy soils in Western Australia, Victoria and South Australia, particularly in dryland regions increasingly affected by drought under climate change, would also greatly benefit.”

Prof. Joseph is an expert in producing engineered stable biochar from agriculture, urban and forestry residues. He has been researching the benefits of biochar in promoting healthy soils and addressing climate change since he was introduced to it by Indigenous Australians in the seventies. He says biochar has been used for production of crops and for maintaining healthy soils by Indigenous peoples in Australia, Latin America (especially in the Amazon basin) and Africa for many hundreds of years.

Biochar has also been recorded in the 17th Century as a feed supplement for animals. But while Australian researchers have studied biochar since 2005, it has been relatively slow to take off as a commercial product, with Australia producing around 5000 tonnes a year. “This is in part due to the small number of large-scale demonstration programs that have been funded, as well as farmers’ and government advisors’ lack of knowledge about biochar, regulatory hurdles, and lack of venture capital and young entrepreneurs to fund and build biochar businesses,” Prof. Joseph said.

In comparison, the US is producing about 50,000 tonnes a year, while China is producing more than 500,000 tonnes a year. Prof. Joseph, who has received an Order of Australia for his work in renewable energy and biochar, says to enable widespread adoption of biochar, it needs to be readily integrated with farming operations and be demonstrated to be economically viable. “We’ve done the science, what we don’t have is enough resources to educate and train people, to establish demonstrations so farmers can see the benefits of using biochar, to develop this new industry,” he noted.

However this is slowly changing as large corporations are purchasing carbon dioxide reduction certificates (CORC’s) to offset their emissions, which is boosting the profile of biochar in Australia.

Biochar has potential in a range of applications. Prof. Joseph co-authored a recent study in International Materials Reviews which detailed the less well-known uses of biochar, such as a construction material, to reduce toxins in soil, grow microorganisms, in animal feed and soil remediation. UNSW has a collaborative grant with a company and a university in Norway to develop a biochar based anti-microbial coating to kill pathogens in water and find use in air filtration systems, he said.

Stephen Joseph is a member of the Australian New Zealand Biochar Industries Group. The Universities where he works have received grants from both state and federal governments and from companies for the development and testing of biochars. He has also assisted companies and farmers develop fit for purpose biochars and equipment to make biochar.

***

With all the “news” about climate change and the incessant clamor to do something about it, its just a shame the answer has been around for centuries, real world proven across the planet, researched by the thousands of papers for decades and remains, well, out of sight, out of mind.

But there isn’t any “disruptive tech” about biochar. Nor any patent for the process to make it. No billion dollar public offering looks likely. Etc. — Which is why your humble writer takes practically all “climate change” stuff as dis-credible right from the start. Just follow the money.

When the situation gets real, the answer is right there – Biochar. The quick, cheap, easy, good for the environment and world food economy answer.

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2 November, 2021
 

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How three youth started a fertiliser company with Sh50,000 seed capital | Nation

2 November, 2021
 

The rice husks are collected from farms and then processed into biochar, a charcoal-like substance that’s made by burning organic material from agricultural and forestry wastes
 

When three graduates pooled their resources to venture into production of organic fertiliser, the main aim of their business idea was to meet a social need, to provide a local solution to a local need.

Today, what started with a seed capital of Sh50,000 has grown into a multimillion company, Safi Organics Company, which is worth Sh150million. The company converts rice husk, which is considered waste, into high-yielding organic fertiliser at an affordable cost, in the process of transforming lives through sustainable agriculture.

The fortified organic fertiliser is produced under the brand name Safi Sarvi, which can be used on tomatoes, French beans, capsicum, cabbages, onions, maize, rice and for top dressing in acidic soils.

The brains behind the formation of the business, located in Mwea,  Kirinyaga County,  is Samuel Wanderi, 32, Kevin Kung 35,and Joyce Kamande, 29. Wanderi, who came up with the idea and sold it to his colleagues, is an agri-business graduate of the University of Nairobi, Kung a Massachusetts Institute of Technology trained engineer, while Kamande is a procurement graduate from Dedan Kimathi University.

“Safi organics was registered in February 2015. We used individual savings as our seed capital. We were looking into ways in which we could convert the rice husk, which many farmers saw as a nuisance, into cash by making fertilisers. Many farmers were struggling with tons of husks after harvest, which was left lying idle in their farms, ” says Wanderi.

They started small, producing an affordable organic soil conditioner to fix soil acidity, which they sold to smallholder farmers. The yields were amazing. Wanderi explains that it increased farmers’ yields by 30 percent for every acre of land it is used.

“We have since invested in laboratory equipment and milling machines, we bought the land where we have set up our company three years after we started the enterprise, for Sh2million. The latest valuation indicates we are worth about Sh150million and our target is to hit Sh1billion before 2030.”

The firm is offering a range of services and products under the brand name Safi Sarvi fertilisers : 50kg top dressing fertiliser retails at Sh2,000, 25kg goes for Sh1,100, 10kg Sh400, foliar feeds fertiliser for Sh500 per litre, while the acidic soil amender goes for Sh1,700.

“In 2015 when we started the company, we had about 30 farmers who we sold fertiliser worth about Sh600,000. Today we cater to 6,000 smallholder farmers and about 10 percent large scale farmers in Kirinyaga, Embu and Machakos counties and beyond who buy our products. In a good month, we make sales worth Sh1million,” explains the businessman.

Samuel Wanderi

Samuel Wanderi  is an agri-business graduate.
 

To give farmers value for their money, last year, the company diversified into soil testing services and invested in a soil testing laboratory which also forms part of its revenue stream.

“We charge Sh2,000 for a soil test if we collect the samples, but if farmers bring the sample to us, we charge Sh1,500. We are happy that farmers are now seeing the importance of soil testing as this is translating to high yields and a 40 percent saving on the inputs they buy.”

The company employs 18 workers, majority of them university and college graduates.

“About 95 percent of our workforce is made up of youth below 35 years. Our youngest employee is 21 years old. Indirectly, we have employed more than 100 youth in Mwea who collect rice husk and converts it into biochar and sell to us.”

“We realised that the process of converting the husks into biochar is tedious, and decided to empower the youth through the assistance of Kilimo Trust, a not-for-profit organisation working on agriculture for development across the East Africa Community who helped the youth register community-based organisations which buy rice husks directly from the millers and converts to biochar, and then sells it to us. “

Some of these youth groups include Mwea Carbonators, Murinduko Group and Kiarukungo Group.

“One of the best performing groups makes up to Sh200,000 a month. We give them orders of between 500 to 2,000 bags depending on the capacity of production. We buy a bag of 30kg biochar for between Sh200 and Sh300,” explains Wanderi.

He says the secret of success is working with like-minded partners and individuals.

“One of the lessons we have learned is that to help smallholder farmers thrive and prosper, we have to develop strategic partnerships with governments, institutions, experts and other players in the agriculture sector to provide the full range of support smallholder farmers need to prosper.”

Currently, the company is collaborating with OCP Kenya, a fertiliser making company, Kenya Agricultural Research and Livestock Organisation, University of Nairobi, Kabete campus, Cornell University in the US and Egerton University through Kilimo Trust to develop and do efficacy trials for the new products.

“This will help in ensuring the efficacy of our products as they will be based on scientifically backed data. We’re also banking on Kilimo Trust to replicate what we have here in Western Kenya.

He added: “Our vision in the next five years is to replicate what we’re doing here in Mwea in five other regions across the country and already, we are collaborating with Lake Basin Agrotech in Kisumu County to make fertilisers as they have rice husk which can be used to make biochar.”

But it has not been all smooth sailing as one of the biggest challenges they faced at initial stages included getting their products registered by the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS) and building trust among farmers that their products were good and the Covid-19 pandemic which disrupted farming activities as farmers had nowhere to sell their produce.

“It took 18 months before our first product was registered and certified by KEBS. We carried a lot of farm demonstration and awareness campaigns to convince farmers to buy our products,” said Mr Wanderi.

Well, it worked.

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Biochar Fertilizer market size to bolster over 2020-2026 – AEResearch.net

2 November, 2021
 

According to new Recent report on Biochar Fertilizer market Size By Types (Organic Fertilizer , Inorganic Fertilizer and Compound Fertilizer and Others), by Application (Cereals , Oil Crops , Fruits and Vegetables and Others), By Regional Outlook – Global Industry Analysis Report, Growth Potential, Price Trend, Competitive Market Share & Forecast, 2020 – 2026.

The research report on Biochar Fertilizer market is a detailed documentation of the important parameters that are slated to hold relevance in this business arena over the projected duration of the study. Additionally, the documents gives notable inputs in terms of the impact of COVID-19 on the industry growth. A conclusive analysis of various drivers, restraints, and opportunities shaping the business space also covers an immense portion of the study. Further, it also discusses the regional landscape as well as the competitive terrain of the Biochar Fertilizer market.

Biochar Fertilizer market is segmented by Type, and by Application. Players, stakeholders, and other participants in the global Biochar Fertilizer market will be able to gain the upper hand as they use the report as a powerful resource. The segmental analysis focuses on production capacity, revenue and forecast by Type and by Application for the period 2015-2026.

Request Sample Copy of this Report @ https://www.aeresearch.net/request-sample/481476

Addressing the key pointers from the Biochar Fertilizer market study:

Elaborating the competitive scale of the Biochar Fertilizer market:

Other takeaways from the report which will influence the Biochar Fertilizer Industry remuneration:

A gist of the regional landscape of the Biochar Fertilizer market:

The study objectives of this report are:

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October 2021 USBI Director's Report: BioChar – Reddit

3 November, 2021
 


Green remediation of pharmaceutical wastes using biochar: a review | SpringerLink

3 November, 2021
 

Pharmaceutical waste generation in domestic and industrial discharges is a major challenge requiring adapted treatment solutions. Antibiotics, pain killers, lifesaving drugs, birth control pills, and tetracycline are released by human activities. Biochar has recently drawn attention as an adsorbents to remove pharmaceutical pollutants. Here we review biochar applications for the treatment of tetracycline, sulfonamides, quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. We discuss production methods, biochar properties, post-treatment methods and agents for biochar activation, adsorption mechanisms involved, performance of the biochar with respect to the sorbate, and operating conditions. Biochars from renewable materials show 100% recovery of pharmaceutical pollutants. Unlike other adsorbents, biochar can be recycled up to 8 times with a very low decline of efficiency. The highest recoveries of pharmaceutical pollutants using biochars is 1163 mg/g for tetracycline by biochar from Eucommia ulmoides; 400 mg/g for sulfamethoxazole with sugarcane bagasse biochar; 596 mg/g for naproxen by peanut shell biochar, and 698.6 mg/g for norfloxacin by corncob-derived biochar.

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All data and materials support the published claims and comply with field standards.

Phosphoric acid

Hydrochloric acid

Potassium bicarbonate

Potassium acetate

Sodium hydroxide

Potassium permanganate

Nitric acid

Hydrogen peroxide

Potassium hydroxide

Hydroxyl group

Copper ion

Zinc ion

Lead ion

Cadmium ion

Ferrous ion

Calcium

Phosphorous

Oxygen

Hydrogen

Carbon

Nitrogen

Square meter per gram

Micro gram per liter

Milligram per gram

Cubic centimeter per gram

No funds, grants, or other support was received.

NR contributed to conceptualization; BS and NR contributed to methodology; RSM and RLM contributed to writing—original draft preparation; BS, NR, and D-VNV contributed to writing—review and editing.

Correspondence to Natarajan Rajamohan.

The authors declare they have no financial interests.

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Received: 08 October 2021

Accepted: 20 October 2021

Published: 03 November 2021

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10311-021-01348-y

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EY's carbon claim under spotlight | Environment Analyst Global

3 November, 2021
 

The credibility of carbon offsetting as a tool for achieving emissions reductions is increasingly being challenged

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PhD Proposal – Maria Rossetti (ZOOM) – UVA Engineering

3 November, 2021
 

All Invited:

Date: Thursday, November 4, 2021

Time: 2:00-3:30 EST

 

Committee Members:

Dr. Lisa Colosi-Peterson (ESE) – Chair

Dr. Teresa Culver (ESE) – Advisor

Dr. Andres Clarens (ESE)

Dr. James Smith (ESE) 

Dr. James Galloway (Environmental Science)

 

Zoom:  

Please contact the office for details.

Title: Evaluating biochar for use as a soil amendment for stormwater runoff management

Abstract: 

Elevated levels of nutrients, such as nitrogen, can threaten the health of water bodies by accelerating eutrophication and producing toxic algal blooms. Roadway runoff is an important contributor of nitrogen to nearby waterways. To manage stormwater runoff, soil amendments can be added to roadway soils. Compost is often used as a soil amendment as it promotes infiltration and re-vegetation. However, previous research has demonstrated that compost may serve as a source of leachable nitrogen. Biochar, a charcoal-like material made from pyrolyzed organic matter, is a promising alternative as evidence suggests it also encourages infiltration and re-vegetation in addition to reducing nitrogen transport. However, stormwater composition, storm volume, antecedent dry period, and hydraulic residence time could influence nitrogen transport in soils. This raises concerns about how these factors and soil amendments (e.g. biochar and compost) may interact to affect nitrogen transport in a natural environment.

 

This dissertation evaluates and compares nitrogen transport in biochar and compost-amended soils under varying stormwater compositions, storm volume, antecedent dry period, and hydraulic residence times. We use sorption tests and a batch leaching test to quantify the impact of stormwater composition on nitrogen transport from these amendments. Additionally, three series of column studies are used to evaluate the impact of storm volume, antecedent dry conditions, and hydraulic residence time on nitrogen transport in amended soils. Column influent and effluent samples are analyzed for nitrate, nitrite, and total dissolved nitrogen using ion chromatography and a Shimadzu TOC-L with a TNM analyzer. The results of this dissertation will contribute to the knowledge of how biochar and compost may perform under field conditions and lead to recommendations for implementing these materials for stormwater runoff management. 

 

© 2021 University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science


Enhanced effect of biochar on leaching vanadium and copper from stone coal tailings by …

4 November, 2021
 

Among the many extraction technologies for recovering metal resources from tailings, bioleaching technology is gradually showing its momentum. In our research, the enhanced effect of biochar on the bioleaching of stone coal tailings by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans (T. ferrooxidans) has been explored. In the static bioleaching experiment for 10 days, the leaching rate of vanadium (V) and copper (Cu) increased by 26.8% and 21.0% respectively after adding 5 g/L biochar. The dynamic bioleaching experiment further verified that under the promotion of biochar, the 44 day cumulative leaching rate of V and Cu increased by 15.3% and 14.5%, respectively. The promoting effect of biochar on T. ferrooxidans was mainly reflected in two aspects. The unique porous structure of biochar created a microenvironment for free microorganisms for inhabitation, while storing abundant nutrients. Biochar can also act as an excellent electronic medium to promote electron transfer, improving the oxidation ability of T. ferrooxidans on Fe2+. Furthermore, the presence of biochar may effectively inhibit the formation of jarosite precipitation on tailings in bioleaching, thereby improving the dissolution of tailings and the release of metal elements. This study demonstrates that biochar-enhanced bioleaching may be an efficient and environmentally friendly method for recovering metal resources from tailings.

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Not applicable.

This research was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (51874018) and the National Key R&D Program of China (2019YFC1805001).

Conceptualization: Yingbo Dong; Methodology: Yingbo Dong; Formal analysis and investigation: Yingbo Dong; Writing—original draft preparation: Shijia Chong; Writing—review and editing: Shijia Chong; Funding acquisition: Yingbo Dong; Resources: Hai Lin; Supervision: Hai Lin.

Correspondence to Hai Lin.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

The authors declare no competing interests.

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Responsible Editor: Zhihong Xu

Received: 06 September 2021

Accepted: 25 October 2021

Published: 04 November 2021

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-17259-y

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Study: Biochar to Improve Anticorrosive Performance : PaintSquare News

4 November, 2021
 

 

Main News Page

Friday, November 5, 2021

A recent study found that biochar nanoparticles (BCN), or graphene oxide, derived from spruce wood and wheat straw can improve corrosion resistance in zinc-rich epoxy coatings. The study, published in Progress in Organic Coatings, suggests a more sustainable option for the coatings industry.

Four kinds of coatings were prepared for analysis:

The coatings were then studied via open circuit potential (OCP), an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), a salt spray test, 3D confocal microscope and electro scanning electron microscope (SEM). Researchers found that coatings with the presence of GO increased the shielding effect of zinc particles, improving corrosion resistance.

A recent study found that biochar nanoparticles (BCN), or graphene oxide, derived from spruce wood and wheat straw can improve corrosion resistance in zinc-rich epoxy coatings.

The study also found that biochar increases the interlayer spacing of coatings, the galvanic corrosion of GO is relatively week and that carbon nanotubes should not be used to modify GO in zinc-rich coatings.

Researchers included Yong Tian from the School of Science of Qingdao University of Technology and Zhenxiao Bi and Gan Cui from the College of Pipeline and Civil Engineering of China University of Petroleum.

Other Biochar Studies

In 2019, researchers at the University of Sheffield, in South Yorkshire, England, had found a use for pine needles beyond holiday decor.

Cynthia Kartey, a Ph.D. student in the university’s Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, argued that different products—including paint—could be made from the chemicals that are extracted when pine needles are processed.

According to Kartey, about 85% of pine needles’ makeup is a complex polymer known as lignocellulose. The structure is broken down into a solid by-product, biochar and a liquid product, bio-oil, which typically contains glucose, phenol and acetic acid, which is used for making paint and adhesives.

Researchers said that the ultimate goal would be to use the chemicals to replace less sustainable substances used in the industry.

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The effect of biochar application in microalgal culture on the biomass yield and cellular … – Informit

4 November, 2021
 

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Preparation of Straw Porous Biochars by Microwave-Assisted KOH Activation for … – Figshare

4 November, 2021
 


Maren Oelbermann – SED – SOIL ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS

4 November, 2021
 


Properties and heavy metal leaching characteristics of leachate sludge derived biochar

4 November, 2021
 

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Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, China

Correspondence

Huiqin Zhang, Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, 430068, China.

Email: hqzhang@hbut.edu.cn

Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, China

Contribution: Data curation (supporting)

Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, China

Contribution: Data curation (supporting)

Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, China

Contribution: ​Investigation (supporting)

Blue Minerals Consultancy, Wattle Grove, Tasmania, Australia

Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, China

Contribution: Formal analysis (supporting)

Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, China

Correspondence

Huiqin Zhang, Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, 430068, China.

Email: hqzhang@hbut.edu.cn

Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, China

Contribution: Data curation (supporting)

Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, China

Contribution: Data curation (supporting)

Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, China

Contribution: ​Investigation (supporting)

Blue Minerals Consultancy, Wattle Grove, Tasmania, Australia

Hubei Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration of River-lakes and Algal Utilization, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan, China

Contribution: Formal analysis (supporting)

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Heavy metals and metalloids, in sludge and sediments, are environmental pollutants of concern with long-term negative effects on human and ecological health. In this study, sludge from biological treatment of municipal waste leachate was pyrolyzed into leachate sludge derived biochar (LSDB) at 300-900°C, comprising complex organic and inorganic (particularly heavy metals) species formed from heterogeneous chemical reactions. Based on different advanced material analyses, i.e., DGA, FTIR, SEM and XRD analysis, this study revealed that mass loss and microstructural changes of LSDBs occurred primarily due to decomposition of volatiles, aromatic rings, carbonates and hydroxides. The leaching behaviors of heavy metals from LSDBs were evaluated using the synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP). The final pH in SPLP increased from 7.5 to 12.5 with pyrolysis temperature. The pH increase favored the retention of heavy metals in the LSDBs due to the formation of low soluble precipitates at alkaline pH. The heavy metals and metalloids in the LSDBs were present as surface precipitates due to precipitation and cation exchange rather than surface complexation. The leaching contents of metals and metalloids, such as Cr, Cd, Ni, Pb, and As, were all below their respective maximum discharge standards for the first priority pollutants in China.

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White Biotechnology Market Size, Demand, Growth, Trends, Segmentation and Forecasts …

4 November, 2021
 

The latest White Biotechnology market research offers a comprehensive analysis of the information gathered over the past few years with the aim of predicting information for years to come. This is facilitated by the graphical presentation of data in the form of tables, charts, and graphs. to give the reader a clear understanding of the market. The information provided in the study draws attention to market size, trends, gross sales, volume, growth drivers, expert opinions, key facts and figures, and other industry-leading information to provide accurate market estimates. The research report offers valuable insights into the White Biotechnology market Report by examining key industry information.

The research literature on White Biotechnology market thoroughly investigates this industry vertical by explicating the key development trends, limitations, challenges, and opportunities that will mold the business dynamics in the coming years. Proceeding further, it highlights the top regional markets and reveals the major areas to further business development, while providing a comprehensive account of the prominent companies in this domain. Apart from this, it also gauges the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on revenue generation and breaks down the business strategies employed by well-established organizations to adapt to the changes in this industry.

Major highlights from the Covid-19 impact analysis:

Request Sample Copy of this Report @ https://www.aeresearch.net/request-sample/483820

An overview of the regional analysis:

Additional takeaways from the White Biotechnology market report:

Some Points from Table of Content

Chapter 1 White Biotechnology market Introduction and Market Overview

Chapter 2 Executive Summary

Chapter 3 Industry Chain Analysis

Chapter 4 Global White Biotechnology market, by Type

Chapter 5 White Biotechnology market, by Application

Chapter 6 Global White Biotechnology market Analysis by Regions

Chapter 7 North America White Biotechnology market Analysis by Countries

Chapter 8 Europe White Biotechnology market Analysis by Countries

Chapter 9 Asia Pacific White Biotechnology market Analysis by Countries

Chapter 10 Middle East and Africa White Biotechnology market Analysis by Countries

Chapter 11 South America White Biotechnology market Analysis by Countries

Chapter 12 Competitive Landscape

Chapter 13 Industry Outlook

Chapter 14 Global White Biotechnology market Forecast

Chapter 15 New Project Feasibility Analyses

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New strategies could help California meet methane goals in fight against climate change – ABC30

4 November, 2021
 

WATCH LIVE

New strategies could help California meet methane goals


Mike Williams | Rice News | News and Media Relations

4 November, 2021
 

Pathogens get comfy in designer goo

July 22, 2021

Biochar helps hold water, saves money

July 21, 2021

Odds are good for unique 2D compound

July 20, 2021

Targeted tumors attack not-innocent bystanders

July 16, 2021

Drug doubles down on bone cancer, metastasis

July 16, 2021

Enzyme from fungi shows molecules which way to turn

July 15, 2021

Vicente Ordóñez joins Rice with CAREER Award

July 13, 2021

Rice, Rutgers developing inhalable COVID-19 vaccine spray

July 7, 2021

Soft shell makes hard ceramic less likely to shatter

July 7, 2021

Cell-wrangling circuit simplifies genetic experiments

July 6, 2021

NIH grant will help streamline chemical synthesis

July 5, 2021

Reversal speeds creation of important molecule

June 29, 2021

Keck backs Rice bid to ‘build a brain’

June 28, 2021

Quantum dots keep atoms spaced to boost catalysis

June 24, 2021

Nightside radio could help reveal exoplanet details

June 22, 2021

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Patriot Hydrogen and CAC-H2 form green hydrogen JV | Energy Global

4 November, 2021
 

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Energy Global, Wednesday, 03 November 2021 12:50

Emerging renewables company, Patriot Hydrogen Ltd., has formed a lucrative joint venture (JV) agreement with CAC-H2 Pte Ltd. of Singapore.

The agreement sees CAC-H2 become the lead technology provider, supporting Patriot Hydrogen’s projects to develop, build and commission Waste to Energy Plants – Patriot to Hydrogen (P2H) units. CAC-H2 will be the exclusive technical and mechanical advisor and supplier for the Patriot Units.

The P2H units are designed to produce syngas, hydrogen, green energy, and biochar throughout Australia. The units are designed to be modular and portable for ease of use and transportability.

They are based on proprietary technology provided by CAC-H2, which includes components such as the in-feed system, discharge system for the produced biochar and the recovery and cleaning of the produced syngas suitable for immediate input to fuelled generator equipment.

Patriot Hydrogen and CAC-H2 have engaged Liberty Energy Capital to work as advisors to raise money for working capital in pre-IPO funding. Additionally, Liberty Energy Capital is co-ordinating the raise of funds through its advisors and developing a strategy to seek to take Patriot Hydrogen Ltd. Public on a suitable securities exchange either in Australia, Canada, or the US.

Additionally, major economies around the world are rapidly shifting to renewable energy sources as they strive to meet their zero emissions targets.

The growing demand for hydrogen is evident with global oil majors such as BP and Woodside announcing their hydrogen aspirations.

The Autumn issue of Energy Global features a varied spectrum of in-depth technical articles detailing recent projects, future projections, and technological advancements in the renewables sector, from companies including MISTRAS Group, Fugro, X1 Wind, Sulzer, and more.

Olivier Mussat will join the company as its Chief Executive Officer from his role as the Chief Investment Officer for Global Energy at the International Finance Corporation.

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Sprott and Warm Heart partner to advance sustainable development

5 November, 2021
 

Phone: 613-520-2388
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Effect of biochar amendment on organic matter and dissolved organic matter composition of …

5 November, 2021
 

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搜索

5 November, 2021
 

Recoverable magnetic biochar has great potential for treating wastewater contaminants such as Pb(II). However, whether magnetic modification could enhance metal adsorption efficiency is currently contradictory in the literature mainly due to the differences in selecting various magnetic functionalization conditions. Considering this gap in knowledge, the effects of magnetic functionalization method (impregnation and precipitation), concentration of precursor iron solution (0.01–1 M), and pyrolysis temperature (300–700 °C) on the characteristics and Pb(II) adsorption capacity of biochar were systematically investigated in this paper. Results indicated that Fe3O4 was the main product for magnetic biochars synthesized using the impregnation (denoted as FWFe(3)) and precipitation methods (denoted as FWFe(2)). Magnetic functionalization resulted in remarkably increased pH and more negative zeta potential for FWFe(2) samples, whereas FWFe(3) samples showed the opposite trends. The adsorption of Pb(II) on different biochars fitted the pseudo-second order model and the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity was 817.64 mg/g for FWFe(2)1M700C (precipitation by 1 M of Fe(II)/Fe(III), pyrolysis at 700 °C), outperforming FWFe(3) and pristine biochar samples by around 5–13 times. Mechanism study indicated that the adsorption mainly involved electrostatic attraction, ion exchange, co-precipitation, and complexation. Pb(II) adsorption capacity was strongly dependent on the alkali pH of biochar. However, this efficiency was less affected by biochar surface area and its morphology. The higher pH of FWFe(2) samples not only led to an increased surface charge for stronger electrostatic attraction and ion exchange but also favored the formation of co-precipitates. By contrast, FWFe(3) samples showed a decreased adsorption capacity for Pb(II) with increased concentration of embedded iron. Overall, magnetic biochar, prepared using precipitation followed by high-temperature pyrolysis (such as, FWFe(2)1M700C), can be a promising adsorbent for Pb(II) adsorption from wastewater.


Application of magnetic biochar/quaternary phosphonium salt to combat the antibiotic … – X-MOL

5 November, 2021
 

The overuse and misuse of antibiotics in animal breeding for disease treatment and growth enhancement have been major drivers of the occurrence, diffusion, and accumulation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in wastewater. Strategies to combat ARG dissemination are pressingly needed for human and ecological safety. To achieve this goal, a biochar-based polymer, magnetic biochar/quaternary phosphonium salt (MBQ), was applied in livestock wastewater and displayed a high performance in bacterial deactivation and ARG decrease. Efficient antibacterial effects were achieved by both MBQ and quaternary phosphonium salt; however, the abundance and fold change of ARGs in the MBQ treatment indicated a more powerful ARG dissemination control than quaternary phosphonium salt. The application of MBQ evidently reduced the microbial diversity and may primarily be responsible for altering the ARG profiles in wastewater. Network, redundancy, and variation partitioning analyses were further employed to reveal that the microbial community and the presence of mobile genetic elements were two critical factors shaping the pattern of the antibiotic resistome in livestock wastewater. Considered together, these findings extend the application field of biochar and have important implications for reducing ARG dissemination risks in livestock wastewater.


Landscape Restoration and Renewable Energy – Contribute to Climate Change Mitigation

5 November, 2021
 

Relevant Resource(s): FLR Ghana

Gasifiers Kenya

Biochar

Charcoal

Whitepaper

Sustainable charcoal and biochar help to restore forest landscapes

Relevant Resource(s): FLR Ghana


The Metabolizer Is Turning Trash Into Treasure Even Faster Now | Hackaday

5 November, 2021
 

Do you remember [Sam Smith]’s Metabolizer from a few years back? In case you’ve forgotten, this baby takes trash and turns it into printed plastic objects, and it’s solar-powered to boot. Although the Metabolizer didn’t win the 2018 Hackaday Prize, [Sam] and his machine won many achievements that year, including the Open Hardware Challenge. It’s fantastic to see the project still improving.

[Sam] likens this beast to a Rube Goldberg machine in that it performs an overly-complicated chain reaction to do a simple task. We certainly see his point, but we think that this machine is worth so much more than those classic machines, which tend to do nothing useful at all and tend to consume many resources in the process.  On the contrary, the Metabolizer’s chain reaction starts with sunshine and ends with useful objects that keep plastic out of landfills. Honestly, it’s more akin to a compost heap with a PhD in Biology and a handful of steroids and a 3D printer attached.

Unfortunately, [Sam] couldn’t get a prototype working in time for the Prize, and he turned to Patreon to gain support after the $1,000 ran out. Three years and a ton of improvements later, [Sam] has a working prototype that’s cheaper, more efficient, and easier to build. But can it be built relatively easily by someone other than [Sam]? Consider the gauntlet thrown down.

Not happy with your standard-style compost pile? You need a DIY trommel to sift out the bad stuff.

Interesting. I wonder how the efficiency of converting the paper/cardboard input to liquid fuel to generate electricity compares with just burning it instead (and generating electricity using a steam turbine)? It looks like it is running outside, which is probably a good idea given the fumes that might be coming off of it.

Neat to read! Way to go! I literally just checked the tracking on some Silicon Carbide (80grit) I recently ordered to coat a hot finger (cold finger in reverse… ok not exactly though heat flow) using silica glass to adhere, that will be at the focal point of the Fresnel Lens that I’m amazed I’ve not seen anyone make a design using a waveguide like Horn Antenna to improve heat transfer.

I also think the Horn Antenna will make the unit safer so kiddos can see the system used and the “oven” focal point being somewhat akin to an old wood burning stove hot plate with potential to place a pot down in the oven like the Tamera solar cooker/oven design focal point area/volume.

I also plan to use some sort of either bio-refractory fiber or kao like wool to line the fixed position heater box oven focal point area. Planning to also eventually automate tracking and have more materials to work on that. Planning to just have the pivot point being the axis where the focal point is for now, where I’ll have to counter weight behind the stove box.

I’m also wondering about needing an air curtain just behind the lens in the future for hot days and also planning a flock material or at least for now the white on one side and black on other grow room material I have for the front drop curtain to control temp and power on/off.

Wondering if the above might inspire another method to go about the initial powering of the system?

Another odd observation I’ve not read about online is no one is using the mirrors from the old projection screen TV’s. I’ve stashed a few of those too, with plans to make an optical train for lower light conditions periods… plus a possible solar oven.

must be great to smell it 🙂

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The Magic of Bio Char – Terra Robinia, Algarve, Portugal

5 November, 2021
 

Biochar is fully carbonized biomass with as little remaining volatile compounds as possible.

As such it’s a soil stable form of carbon with a very long half-life, meaning it stays in your soil for hundreds, if not thousands of years.

Biochar is what I call a force multiplier, almost every aspect on the farm or homestead can be improved with the addition of biochar.

Here’s just some of the things that biochar can do for you:

-Increase the soils water holding capacity

-Increase drainage and aeration of your soil

-Improve the feed conversion ratio when used as a feed additive for livestock

-Improve the health of your livestock

-Increase the quality of your compost and reduce nutrient leaching

-Severely reduce (or even eliminate completely) the smell in your animal coop

-Can be used as filtration media in ponds

-Can be used as drainage material in grey water systems or for areas that are prone to extended flooding, it’s porous nature means it won’t clog up easily.

-Can be used to make water potable

-Improve indoor air quality when used as ingredient in cob

-Block EMF radiation when used as ingredient in cob or applied as plaster

-Increase the insulation value of cob

-Increase the humidity regulating quality of cob

-Increase the strength of cement/concrete by slowing down the curing process

-Clean your dishes without any soap, even when only cold water is available

-Can be used as natural toothpaste

If you would like to learn how to make this amazing product, please join us for a day of learning by doing at Terra Robinia. Our instructor for this day is Martijn Macaopino, from Permaculture Playground.

https://www.facebook.com/PermaculturePlayground

As always, this workshop includes a nourishing lunch, locally sourced and freshly prepared on the day,

by Olivia Kirschner

We’ve only got a limited number of spaces available, so please book early.

Date: 4th of December 2021

Location: Silves

Start: 10am

45eur

Thanks for sharing!

Please note that this is an outdoor event. If it rains on the day, we might have to postpone it. Thank you for your comprehension.

Terra Robinia – educating for the future

julia@terrarobinia.com

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Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Size 2021| Industry Analysis, Share, Growth By 2026, Key Players

5 November, 2021
 

Chicago, United States: The research study presented in this report offers complete and intelligent analysis of the competition, segmentation, dynamics, and geographical advancement of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market. It takes into account the CAGR, value, volume, revenue, production, consumption, sales, manufacturing cost, prices, and other key factors related to the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market. The authors of the report have segmented the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market as per product, application, and region. Segments of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market are analyzed on the basis of market share, production, consumption, revenue, CAGR, market size, and more factors. The analysts have profiled leading players of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market, keeping in view their recent developments, market share, sales, revenue, areas covered, product portfolios, and other aspects.

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Key Players Mentioned in the Global Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Research Report:: Diacarbon Energy, Agri-Tech Producers, Biochar Now, Carbon Gold, Kina, The Biochar Company, Swiss Biochar GmbH, ElementC6, BioChar Products, BlackCarbon, Cool Planet, Carbon Terra, Pacific Biochar, Vega Biofuels, Liaoning Jinhefu Group, Hubei Jinri Ecology-Energy, Nanjing Qinfeng Crop-straw Technology, Seek Bio-Technology (Shanghai)

Global Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Type Segments:

Wood Source Biochar
Corn Stove Source Biochar
Rice Stove Source Biochar
Wheat Stove Source Biochar
Other Stove Source Biochar

Global Aluminum Alloy Wheels Market Application Segments:

Soil Conditioner
Fertilizer
Others

The competitive scenario of the global market and the detailed profiles of the participants:

The segmental analysis includes deep evaluation of each and every segment of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market studied in the report. All of the segments of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market are analyzed on the basis of market share, revenue, market size, production, and future prospects. The regional study of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market explains how different regions and country-level markets are making developments. Furthermore, it gives a statistical representation of their progress during the course of the forecast period. Our analysts have used advanced primary and secondary research methodologies to compile the research study on the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market.

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Research Methodology:

This research study involves the extensive usage of both primary and secondary data sources.

Table Research Programs/Design for This Report

Questions Answered by the Report:

1. Which are the dominant players of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market?

2. What will be the size of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market in the coming years?

3. Which segment will lead the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market?

4. How will the market development trends change in the next five years?

5. What is the nature of the competitive landscape of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market?

6. What are the go-to strategies adopted in the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market?

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Take a look at some of the important sections of the report

Market Overview: Readers are informed about the scope of the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market and different products offered therein. The section also gives a glimpse of all of the segments studied in the report with their consumption and production growth rate comparisons. In addition, it provides statistics related to market size, revenue, and production.

Production Market Share by Region: Apart from the production share of regional markets analyzed in the report, readers are informed about their gross margin, price, revenue, and production growth rate here.

Company Profiles and Key Figures: In this section, the authors of the report include the company profiling of leading players operating in the global Aluminum Alloy Wheels market. There are various factors considered for assessing the players studied in the report: markets served, production sites, price, gross margin, revenue, production, product application, product specification, and product introduction.

Manufacturing Cost Analysis: Here, readers are provided with detailed manufacturing process analysis, industrial chain analysis, manufacturing cost structure analysis, and raw materials analysis. Under raw materials analysis, the report includes details about key suppliers of raw materials, price trend of raw materials, and important raw materials.

Market Dynamics: The analysts explore critical influence factors, market drivers, challenges, risk factors, opportunities, and market trends in this section.

Why Report Hive Research:

Report Hive Research delivers strategic market research reports, statistical surveys, industry analysis and forecast data on products and services, markets and companies. Our clientele ranges mix of global business leaders, government organizations, SME’s, individuals and Start-ups, top management consulting firms, universities, etc. Our library of 700,000 + reports targets high growth emerging markets in the USA, Europe Middle East, Africa, Asia Pacific covering industries like IT, Telecom, Semiconductor, Chemical, Healthcare, Pharmaceutical, Energy and Power, Manufacturing, Automotive and Transportation, Food and Beverages, etc.

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Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market to See New Innovations in Near Future and … – Sportlineng

5 November, 2021
 

Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market 2021: Global Business Growth, Demand, Trends, Forecasts till 2026

United States,– The report is a comprehensive analysis of the Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace market and covers facts and growth drivers for the market profile. Manufacturing technologies and applications that form a part of this market success are also included in the report. Based on such information, the market has been segmented into various categories and portrays the maximum market share for the forecast period. The study is a result of various analysis techniques used to derive the relevant information. These analysis techniques include SWOT methodologies and Porter’s Five Force Model. Further, the report has an acute focus on global players, products with the highest demand, and the various product categories, which are causative of the Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace market growth. Micro and macroeconomic indicators, government stipulations that could affect the market, and advice from industry leaders is also included in the report compilation. The study of the market has been taken place during 2021, the base year and the forecast period stretches till 2026.

Overview Of Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market:

The potential of this industry segment has been thoroughly explored in conjunction with essential market challenges. The present market condition and prospects of the segment have also been examined. Moreover, key strategies in the market that includes product developments, partnerships, mergers, and acquisitions, etc., are examined. Additionally, upstream raw materials and equipment and downstream demand analysis are likewise conducted.

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The Global demand for Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market is forecast to report strong development driven by consumption in major evolving markets. More growth opportunities to comes up between 2021 and 2026 compared to a few years ago, signifying the rapid pace of change.

Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market competition by top manufacturers/Key player Profiled: Alcoa, Rio Tinto, Novelis, Rusal, Constellium, Arconic, UACJ, Aleris, Aluar, Kaiser Aluminum

Impact of COVID-19:

Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market report analyses the impact of Coronavirus (COVID-19) on the Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace industry. Since the COVID-19 virus outbreak in December 2019, the disease has spread to almost 180+ countries around the globe with the World Health Organization declaring it a public health emergency. The global impacts of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are already starting to be felt, and will significantly affect the Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace market in 2021.

COVID-19 can affect the global economy in 3 main ways: by directly affecting production and demand, by creating supply chain and market disturbance, and by its financial impact on firms and financial markets.

Market research by types:

2000 Series
6000 Series
7000 Series
Foundry Alloy Ingots

Market research by applications:

Single Aisle Aircraft
Wide Body Aircraft
Cargo Aircraft
Military Aircraft

Competitive Landscape

The report begins with a market overview and moves on to cover the growth prospects of the Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace market. The report covers the details resulting from the analysis of the focused market. The Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace comprises an in the general successful system, confinements, and overall disclosures of the past information along with the present and future needs that may concern the development. The Report provides specific data about the Major factors which are impacting the growth of the Fuels market.

Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market report covers the manufacturers’ data, including shipment, price, revenue, gross profit, interview record, business distribution, etc., this information help the consumer know about the contenders better. This report also covers all the regions and countries of the world, which shows a regional development status, including business sector size, volume, and value, as well as price data.

Research Methodology:

This research study involves the extensive usage of both primary and secondary data sources.

The research process involves the study of various factors affecting the industry, including the government policy, market environment, competitive landscape, historical data, present trends in the market, technological innovation, upcoming technologies and the technical progress in related industry, and market risks, opportunities, market barriers and challenges.

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Table Research Programs/Design for This Report

Key questions answered: Study Explore COVID 19 Outbreak Impact Analysis

– Detailed Overview of market helps clients in making business strategies.
– Influential factors that are thriving demand and constraints in the market.
– What is the market concentration? Is it fragmented or highly concentrated?
– What trends, challenges and barriers will impact the development and sizing of market?
– SWOT Analysis of each key players mentioned along with its company profile with the help of Porter’s five forces tool mechanism to compliment the same.
– What growth momentum or acceleration market carries during the forecast period?
– Which region is going to tap highest market share in future?
– What Application/end-user category or Product Type may see incremental growth prospects?
– What would be the market share of key countries like United States, France, UK, Germany, Italy, Canada, Australia, Japan, China or Brazil etc.?
– What focused approach and constraints are holding the market tight?
– What impact of COVID-19 lockdown on consumers’ awareness, behavior, and attitudes?

Table of contents highlights:

Chapter 1 Introduction:

The Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Research Work Report provides a compact introduction to the world market. This segment provides reviews of key participants, an overview of the Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace industry, outlook for key areas, financial services, and various difficulties facing the Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace market. This section depends on the scope of the study and reporting guideline.

Chapter 2. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Scope of the outstanding report:

This is the second most important chapter that covers market segmentation along with a definition of Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace. It characterizes the entire scope of the Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace report and the various functions described in it.

Chapter 3. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Dynamics and Key Indicators:

This chapter contains key elements that focus on the drivers [includes increasing global Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace frequency and increasing investment in Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace], key market restraints [high cost of Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace], opportunities [emerging markets in developing countries] and details the emerging trends [consistent innovation of newer Screening Products] Developmental Difficulties and Influencing Factors identified in this latest report.

Chapter 4. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Type segments:

This Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace market report shows the market development for various types of products presented by the most far-reaching organizations.

Chapter 5. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Application segments:

The analysts who authored the report have fully assessed the marketability of key applications and exercised future freedoms.

Chapter 6. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Geographic Analysis:

Each provincial market is deliberately examined in order to understand its current and future development, improvement and demand situation for that market.

Chapter 7. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Global Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market:

7.1 North America: Insight into the COVID-19 Impact Study 2021-2026

7.2 Europe: Provides comprehensive insights into the COVID-19 Impact Study 2021-2026

7.3 Asia Pacific: Potential Impacts of COVID-19 (2021-2026)

7.4 Rest of the world: Impact assessment of the COVID-19 pandemic

Chapter 8. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Manufacturing profiles:

The major players in the Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace market are identified in the report based on their market size, served market, products, applications, regional development, and other variables.

Chapter 9. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Estimating Analysis:

This chapter contains a price point analysis by region and various forecasts.

Chapter 10. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market North America Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Analysis:

This chapter provides an assessment of Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace product sales in the major countries of the United States and Canada, as well as a detailed segmental view of those countries for the forecast period 2021-2026.

Chapter 11. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Latin America Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Analysis:

Major countries Brazil, Chile, Peru, Argentina and Mexico are rated for Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace delivery.

Chapter 12. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Europe Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Analysis:

The Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Analysis report stores insights into the supply, demand and sales of Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace in Germany, France, Great Britain, Spain, BENELUX, Scandinavia and Italy.

Chapter 13. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Asia Pacific ex Japan (APEJ) Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Analysis:

Greater China, ASEAN, India, and Australia and New Zealand countries are assessed, and Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace sales assessment in those countries is covered.

Chapter 14. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Middle East and Africa (MEA) Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Analysis:

This chapter focuses on the Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace market scenario in GCC countries, Israel, South Africa, and Turkey.

Chapter 15. Aluminum Alloys for Aerospace Market Research methodology

The research procedure chapter contains the accompanying primary realities,

15.1 Cover

15.2 Desk research

15.3 Primary Research

Chapter 16. Conclusion…….

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Irish Biochar Co-Operative

5 November, 2021
 

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Effect of Biochar on Immobilization of Cadmium and Soil Chemical Properties | SpringerLink

5 November, 2021
 

Wirkung von Biokohle auf die Immobilisierung von Cadmium und die chemischen Eigenschaften des Bodens

A pot experiment was conducted at Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (IBGE), University of Agriculture Peshawar, Pakistan. To conduct the experiment, eight kilograms of air-dried soil were taken in each pot and the amendment biochar was added and mixed properly at different levels like 0%, 1%, 2% and 4% (w/w), respectively. All pots were spiked with Cd solution at the concentration of 10 mg kg−1. The treatments were arranged in completely randomized design (CRD). Fourteen days old nursery plants of rice Oryza sativa L. were transplanted into pots. Five rice plants were grown in each pot. After transplantation of rice plant, the nitrogenous and phosphatic fertilizers (Urea and DAP) were incorporated at the standard rate. Standing water condition was kept for rice grown in pots. Rice plants were harvested after 70 days germination. Soil samples were collected from each pot after plant harvesting. After soil analysis, the given data elaborated that the concentration of Cd in soil was stabilized by the amendment from 8.7 mg kg−1 (0%) to 4.2 mg kg−1 (4%). Among the other soil parameters the minimum soil pH (7.31), EC (0.151 dSm−1), soil organic matter (0.63%), N (0.13%), P (4.72 mg kg−1) and K (55.6 mg kg−1) were noted at 0% biochar application, while maximum pH (8.23), EC (0.231 dSm−1), soil organic matter (1.67%), N (0.25%), P (8.96 mg kg−1) and K (93 mg kg−1) were found in the pot treated with 4% biochar. Hence, it was concluded that Cd was significantly immobilized with 4% biochar application.

Am Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (IBGE), University of Agriculture Peshawar, Pakistan, wurde ein Topfversuch durchgeführt. Dazu wurden acht Kilogramm luftgetrocknete Erde in jeden Topf gegeben und der Zusatzstoff Biokohle in verschiedenen Mengen (0 %, 1 %, 2 % und 4 % (w/w)) hinzugefügt und gut gemischt. Alle Töpfe wurden mit einer Cd-Lösung in einer Konzentration von 10 mg kg−1 versetzt. Die Behandlungen wurden in einem vollständig randomisierten Design (CRD) angeordnet. Vierzehn Tage alte Reispflanzen der Sorte Oryza sativa L. wurden in Töpfe gepflanzt. In jedem Topf wurden fünf Reispflanzen angepflanzt. Nach dem Umpflanzen der Reispflanzen wurden die Stickstoff- und Phosphatdünger (Harnstoff und DAP) in der Standardmenge eingearbeitet. Für den in Töpfen angebauten Reis wurde stehendes Wasser verwendet. Die Reispflanzen wurden nach 70 Tagen Keimung geerntet. Nach der Ernte der Pflanzen wurden aus jedem Topf Bodenproben entnommen. Nach der Bodenanalyse ergaben die vorliegenden Daten, dass die Cd-Konzentration im Boden durch die Ergänzung von 8,7 mg kg−1 (0 %) auf 4,2 mg kg−1 (4 %) stabilisiert wurde. Von den anderen Bodenparametern wurden die Minima von pH-Wert (7,31), EC (0,151 dSm−1), organischer Substanz (0,63 %), N (0,13 %), P (4,72 mg kg−1) und K (55,6 mg kg−1) bei 0 %iger Biokohleanwendung festgestellt, während die Maxima von pH-Wert (8,23), EC (0,231 dSm−1), organischer Bodensubstanz (1,67 %), N (0,25 %), P (8,96 mg kg−1) und K (93 mg kg−1) in dem mit 4 % Biokohle behandelten Topf festgestellt wurden. Daraus wurde geschlossen, dass Cd durch die Anwendung von 4 % Biokohle signifikant immobilisiert wurde.

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Correspondence to Zaryab Murad.

Z. Murad, I. Ahmad, M. Waleed, S. Hashim and S. Bibi declare that they have no competing interests.

Received: 11 September 2021

Accepted: 19 October 2021

Published: 05 November 2021

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10343-021-00597-9

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Young innovators capture carbon and benefits with our help | Business West

5 November, 2021
 

Earthly Biochar, which captures carbon from waste wood and uses it to enhance plant growth, has revamped its investment and marketing strategies with mentoring and growth support from Innovate UK EDGE. 

A Devon-based business founded by two 25-year-olds, it is helping farmers and gardeners to use less water and feed, and grow bigger, healthier plants using an organic soil supplement that also sequesters carbon.

The supplement is made from waste wood, and the production process has the additional benefit of capturing the carbon that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere by the wood rotting or being incinerated.

Earthly Biochar collects waste wood and other biomass, and burns it at very high temperatures in pyrolysis kilns with little or no oxygen present. This process creates a black stable material known as biochar. The biochar captures 50% of the wood’s carbon within crystalline structures that do not biodegrade, meaning they will remain locked into the product for many thousands of years to come. 

Earthly Biochar’s research indicates that, when added to soil, biochar increases plant health and growth by 10-200% and reduces the need for water and fertiliser by 15-40%, depending on existing soil quality. 

In 2020, Earthly Biochar applied for Innovate UK’s Young Innovators Award, winning one of 64 national prizes. The company is now receiving a tailored package of financial support as well as twelve months of mentoring and advice from Innovate UK EDGE, delivered by Business West in the South West of England. 

“Applying for the Young Innovators Award was the best thing we’ve done so far – the support has been fantastic,” says Lottie Hawkins, Co-Founder, Earthly Biochar. 

In 2020, Earthly Biochar was approached by an angel investor offering seed investment, and Lottie began work with Innovate UK EDGE Access to Finance Specialist, Phil Tellwright. 

“Phil was a fantastic sounding board throughout the courting process. When we had concerns, he could either put us at our ease or tell us to push back, and his mentorship proved critical.” 

In spite of receiving an offer of £100,000 investment from the business angel, and with Phil’s guidance, Earthly Biochar decided to decline the offer and grow organically utilising the government’s Kickstart Scheme to hire other young people. 

Innovate UK EDGE marketing specialist, Jane Warren, next stepped in to help develop a marketing strategy, messaging framework and campaign and channel strategy. 

“Jane has a huge amount of marketing experience, and we now have a very comprehensive plan that we can hand over to our two new marketing interns, who will execute the strategy over the next 12 months.” 

For Lottie, one of the most valuable aspects of the support has been the 1-2-1 mentorship from her innovation and growth specialist, Jennifer Barnard. 

“Jennifer really keeps us on our toes with weekly check-ins, holding us to account on actions and making sure that opportunities don’t slip away. She’s also helped us to make some fantastic connections and build our network both regionally and nationally.”

With Jennifer’s support, Earthly Biochar has grown the B2B side of the business and begun large scale farming industry projects. 

“Our ambition is to maximise carbon capture by turning a significant proportion of farming industry waste into biochar. We’d also like to see every gardener in the UK making biochar at home and putting it into their soil.”

“Unlike some of our competitors, carbon sequestration is paramount to everything we do and with Innovate UK EDGE’s support, I think we can become an important part of the climate change solution.” 

Innovate UK EDGE will continue to offer close mentorship and guidance as these Young Innovators from Devon help tackle our climate, waste management and food production challenges.

“With Innovate UK EDGE’s support, I think we can become an important part of the climate change solution.”  

Lottie Hawkins, Co-Founder, Earthly Biochar 

If you are an ambitious company looking to grow, Innovate UK EDGE can help you reach your goals. 

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Global Fine Biochar Powder Industry Research Report 2021 Segmented By Major Market …

5 November, 2021
 

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5. Historic and Future Analysis of the Market


Sustainable Earth – Warm Heart Worldwide

5 November, 2021
 

Global crop waste burning – micro-biochar; how a small community development organization learned experientially to address a huge problem one tiny field at a time

“The world’s 2.5 billion poorest people – small farmers living at the far fringe of the developing world – and their billion or so slightly better off neighbors burn 10.5 billion metric tonnes (tonnes) of crop waste annually. Smoke from their fires reddens the sun, closes airports, shuts schools and governments – and kills millions of people (World Health Organization (WHO).”

So begins Dr. Michael Shafer’s comprehensive Abstract on the problems of smoke, how it is related to climate change, and what we, Warm Heart are doing about it.

You can read the full article at BMC Port of Springer Nature.

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Celebrating National Bioenergy Day | Biomassmagazine.com

5 November, 2021
 

The 9th National Bioenergy Day was celebrated on Oct. 20th.  The week kicked off with a wonderful surprise—a proclamation from President Joe Biden recognizing National Forest Products Week. This statement spotlighted energy as a “valuable” forest product, and outlined the administration’s support for “biofuels, biochar, heat and power” from forest materials. He also noted the jobs and extensive supply chain tied to the forestry sector. This statement closely followed a letter he sent to the American Loggers Council for their annual meeting just a few weeks earlier. The letter noted that “healthy forests are an invaluable part of our economy” and that “forest products touch nearly every part of our daily lives.”  Taken together, these two presidential statements signal a strong interest in forestry and the entire supply chain that surrounds forest products, including biomass power.

It’s exciting that we’ve been able to perpetuate Bioenergy Day for nearly a decade, even when we’re on year two of a global pandemic. Because of the challenges of planning in-person events, we teamed up with the California Biomass Energy Alliance to schedule a series of virtual events during the week of Bioenergy Day.

This year, we wanted to give our respective members an overview of where our policy objectives stand, as well as the latest developments we are monitoring. Our Bioenergy Day events consisted of several virtual events spread out over the week. One panel looked at the latest in transportation credits, with Bob Cleaves updating participants on the latest developments on incorporating electricity into the Renewable Fuel Standard. Graham Noyes of Noyes Law Corp. detailed California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard, and Jack Barrow, BTR Energy, along with Val Tiangco, Sacramental Municipal Utility District, discussed the lessons we might learn from the implementation of that law. Another event examined the latest in biomass carbon management. Dan Sanchez from the University of California at Berkeley spoke about bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration and the U.S. DOE’s Lynn Brickett provided an overview of the agency’s work in carbon capture. Pacific Biochar CEO Josiah Hunt discussed his company’s ability to match biomass power producers with biochar customers, as well as exciting developments in the new frontier of selling biochar carbon credits.

Additionally, the U.S. Space Force hosted a well-timed event on Bioenergy Day to explore using wood energy to power and heat its New Hampshire station.

We look forward to the return of in-person events in the hopefully not-too-distant future. That said, we appreciated the virtual input and participation from stakeholders across the industry. Whether it’s the RFS or the expansion of biochar markets, 2022 will likely be a breakthrough year for the biomass power industry.

Author: Carrie Annand
Executive Director, Biomass Power Association
www.usabiomass.org
carrie@usabiomass.org


Biochar Market Report 2021: Acute Analysis Of Global Demand And Supply 2027 … – EIN Presswire

5 November, 2021
 

There were 72 press releases posted in the last 24 hours and 187,050 in the last 365 days.

Reports And Data

Biochar Market Size – USD 1.45 billion in 2019, Growth – CAGR of 12.3%, Trends – Surging demand in greenhouse remediation

NEW YORK CITY, NY, UNITED STATES, November 5, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Escalating demand for biochar as livestock feed is one of the significant factors influencing the market growth.

The global biochar market is expected to reach USD 3.67 Billion by 2027, according to a new report by Reports and Data. It finds usage as a feed additive and is considered beneficial for the improvement of feed efficiency, animal health, and environment for livestock housing. Livestock rearing is providing better growth prospects for the use of biochar. Animals ranging from earthworms to chickens and cattle, among others, show great interest in food when biochar is added to it. In the European Union, around 90.0% of the biochar is used to feed livestock, and remaining is used in applications, including spreading on agricultural land with manure. A direct application of the product in poultry rearing is the reduction and elimination of odors produced from poultry litter, especially ammonia. The strong positive electric charge of ammonia makes it corrosive and harmful to breathe. This chocking gas is released by bird droppings, making the air toxic and unhealthy to living beings.

Growing demand for high crop yield is one of the significant factors influencing the market growth. The product allows farmers to increase their crop yield by boosting the productivity of the agricultural land, as well as can make an otherwise less productive land produce substantial yields. Biochar soil amendment improves crop productivity mainly by increasing nutrient use efficiency and water holding capacity.

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However, the high cost associated with the production of biochar and low awareness about the beneficial properties may create hindrances in the growth of the market in the upcoming years.

COVID-19 Impact
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a significant impact on the chemicals & materials industry. Demand for products such as biochar is suffering severe shocks across various end-use markets, worldwide supply chains are upset, and the competitive order of manufacturers/producers has witnessed a change. The shortage of demand has fast-tracked the global chemical sector into an oversupply situation. Lack of free movement of the labor force required for the application of biochar on agricultural land and as animal feedstock in the is lacking, thereby hindering the growth of the market in the COVID-19 pandemic. Movement restrictions appear to be a direct and immediate effect, and once the compulsory social distancing ends, it is expected things would get back to normal conditions.

Key participants include Diacarbon Energy Inc., Cool Planet Energy Systems Inc., Agri-Tech Producers LLC, Biochar Products Inc., Vega Biofuels Inc., Phoenix Energy, Pacific Pyrolysis, The Biochar Company, Clean Biofuels BV, and Biochar Supreme LLC, among others.

Further key findings from the report suggest

By technology, pyrolysis contributed to the largest market share of around 75.0% in 2019. It is the most commonly used method for the production of biochar. In this method, the product is produced by the decomposing biomass thermo-chemically in the absence of oxygen at a temperature in the range of 350-700 °C. The process discharges volatile end-products, whereas the carbon-rich solid and non-volatiles end-products are collected as biochar.
By distribution channel, offline held a larger market share in 2019. The biochar industry is very offline-intensive and witnesses transparency. The offline channel necessitates the requirement of substantial investment of time by the buyer and high selling costs, along with considerable knowledge of the market on the seller side.
By application, farming contributed to the largest market share in 2019. The application of biochar for crop production is a feasible alternative that can improve the carbon sequestration rates in the soil, improve soil quality, and reduce farm waste. The product is considered to be beneficial in increasing conventional agricultural productivity and alleviate greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils.
The market in the North American region dominated the market in 2019 and is likely to grow at a rate of 11.6% in the forecast period. The market dominance of the region is owing to a high consumption of meat and a growing inclination for organic food. Besides, high awareness about the benefits of the product in the region is driving the market growth,
In June 2017, Vega Biofuels, Inc. made an announcement about the signing of an agreement to set up a biochar production plant in Anchorage (Alaska), the US intended for a high-grade medium for legal cannabis farmers in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Also, Vega entered into a reseller alliance with an Anchorage cannabis start-up firm for the marketing of its biochar across Alaska.

Download Report Summary Of Biochar Market: https://www.reportsanddata.com/download-summary-form/3226

For the purpose of this report, Reports and Data have segmented the global biochar market on the basis of technology, distribution channel, application, and region:
Technology Outlook
Pyrolysis
Gasification
Others

Distribution Channel Outlook
Online
Offline

Application Outlook
Livestock
Farming
Others

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Regional Outlook
North America
Europe
Asia Pacific
Latin America
MEA

Explore Reports and Data’s Prime Analysis of the global Materials and Chemicals Industry:

Fermentation Chemicals Market: https://www.reportsanddata.com/report-detail/fermentation-chemicals-market

Aerospace Adhesives & Sealants Market: https://www.reportsanddata.com/report-detail/aerospace-adhesives-and-sealants-market

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Fresh biochar out from the oven. What do y'all use yours for?: Permaculture – Reddit

6 November, 2021
 


Buy Wakefield Biochar Soil Conditioner – Premium – 1 Gallon Bag – Zambia

6 November, 2021
 

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Proton power biochar

6 November, 2021
 

Converting poultry litter (PL) to biochar and applying the biochar to cropland as a soil amendment may be a best approach for recovering nutrients from solid biowastes while minimizing nutrient runoff losses from the treated field. To evaluate the potential of PL-derived biochar as a slow-release phosphorus (P) fertilizer, the speciation, lability, and bioavailability of P in PL and the …Tools and techniques for biochar production and biochar products are provided in accordance with various embodiments. For example, some embodiments include a method of biochar production that may include introducing a compound that includes at least carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen into a reaction chamber. The compound may be heated to a temperature of at least 1,000 degrees Celsius in the …

Abstract. Nitrogen (N) deposition-induced soil acidification has become a global problem. However, the response patterns of soil acidification to N addition and the underlying mechanisms remain far from clear. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of 106 studies to reveal global patterns of soil acidification in responses to N addition.Tools and techniques for biochar production and biochar products are provided in accordance with various embodiments. For example, some embodiments include a method of biochar production that may incl … Proton Power, Inc. (Lenoir City, TN, US) International Classes: A01K1/015 …The invention provides for methods, devices, and systems for pyrolyzing biomass. A pyrolysis unit can be used for the pyrolysis of biomass to form gas, liquid, and solid products. The biomass materials can be selected such that an enhanced biochar is formed after pyrolysis. The biomass can be pyrolyzed under specified conditions such that a selected biochar core is formed.Converting poultry litter (PL) to biochar and applying the biochar to cropland as a soil amendment may be a best approach for recovering nutrients from solid biowastes while minimizing nutrient runoff losses from the treated field. To evaluate the potential of PL-derived biochar as a slow-release phosphorus (P) fertilizer, the speciation, lability, and bioavailability of P in PL and the …

The suitability of biochar (BC) as a container substrate depends on the BC mix ratio and plant species. Mixes with mixed hardwood BC (20%, 40%, 60%, and 80%, by volume) and vermicompost (VC; 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%, by volume) were evaluated as container substrates on basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. 'Roma') plants compared to a commercial peat-based …The CO 2 RR performance of the bare biochar and biochar-BiO x electrodes was compared in a two-compartment, three-electrode batch cell as shown in Scheme 1a. A proton exchange membrane (Nafion™ Membrane N117, Ion Power) was used as the separator for the anodic and cathodic sides.

View Carson Bone, P.E.'s profile on LinkedIn, the world's largest professional community. Carson has 5 jobs listed on their profile. See the complete profile on LinkedIn and discover Carson …The CHyP system is also carbon negative, which means instead of harming the environment through carbon emissions, it will actually be helping it. With only water and biochar containing graphene as its byproducts, this system has the potential to change the world. If you'd like to learn more about Proton Power, you can visit their website HERE.


Things You Should Know About the Different Uses of Biochar (Aug 2021) – Reddit

6 November, 2021
 


Forest Products Lab on Twitter: ""Black Gold" or biochar is the result of a waste material being …

6 November, 2021
 

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6 November, 2021
 

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Suitability of Biochar in China and Sub-Saharan Africa: biophysical and socio-economic "fit"

6 November, 2021
 

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Buy The Andersons HumiChar Organic Soil Amendment with Humic Acid and Biochar (40 lb …

6 November, 2021
 

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Biochar making 20 good – youtube – Puro Italia Tartufi

7 November, 2021
 

Biochar market size, analysis, trends, report, share, investment opportunities and forecast to 2022 avoid double counting and that map the durability of carbon sinks and thus the actual climate impact with 20 3.1 persistence of biochar in various applications investors considering investing in the fast-growing biochar market and people thinking about pur- curious to know about market share of key-players or sales volumes or revenues of biochar research further segmented by type, application and important regions. Ama mi brings you in-depth industry analysis, facts & figures to complete business strategy. Reach ama now

07.11.2021

Making charcoal is surprisingly easy. But it is not something you want to do in your backyard except in small quantities. The method i describe here is what is known as the retort or indirect method. Basically, wood is placed in a container and cooked. All the volatile gases are driven off and charcoal remains Making backyard biochar – youtube Biochar market size, share, analysis – industry trends Biochar making 20 good – youtube A carbon sink economy is needed to ensure that carbon sinks are created to the necessary extent. The european biochar industry consortium (ebi) has now published a whitepaper on how this can be implemented and how great the potential is for biochar-based carbon sinks. Press release 14-oct-2020 source european biochar industry consortium e.v Biochar market share, size, trends, & industry analysis European biochar industry consortium linkedin Several biochar equipment companies demonstrate their products and how to create biochar as part of the carbon farming & biochar workshop held on 52017 in

In september 2019 some of the leading players in the young european biochar industry formed the european biochar industry consortium as a non-profit organization in order to promote and support the european biochar industry and its general, non-material and economic interests with the aim of developing the european biochar industry into an important industry sector and making a significant Pyrolysis of waste products into biochar. Vuthisa technologies. June 10, 2018 Making backyard biochar with a 4 foot oregon kiln. Film is dedicated to the late, great jim long Blog- – should i remain invested in infosys Biochar making 20 good – youtube Bruno banani made for woman 20

Physically tired (loss of sleep), or experiencing symptoms like stomach aches and headaches. The feeling of being laughed at or harassed by others, can prevent people from speaking up or trying to deal with the problem. In extreme cases, cyberbullying can even lead to Bier, harald et al. (2020) biochar-based carbon sinks to mitigate climate change 10192020 0148 pm based carbon sinks to mitigate climate change. Ebi whitepaper. European biochar industry trading scheme is to ensure that every tonne of carbon dioxide in the forest is counted Vuthisa biochar test report. The report reveals very low micropore and mesopore counts which is a further indication of adsorption capacity. Our lower htt (highest treatment temperature) of around 500c (this still have to be ascertained) january 20, 2013 at Understanding advice and guidance on investments fca This whitepaper, initiated by the european biochar industry consortium ebi, focusses on the climate issue aspect of biochar, i.e. The need to create carbon sinks and the opportunities that the use of biochar offers for climate protection. It will also address other crucial features of biochar Biomass beneficiation solution vuthisa biochar retort the basic vuthisa biochar retort (kiln kit) consists of 4 main kiln side sections bolted together with 64 x boltnutspring washer assemblies and 128 washers. 4 x channel iron air inlets 2 x collars 1 x heavy duty rounded flat lid with chimney flange 3 x open top reconditioned

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Developing biochar-based slow-release N-P-K fertilizer for controlled nutrient … – SpringerLink

7 November, 2021
 

There has been an augmented attention for broad application of biochar-based slow-release fertilizer (SRF) to agricultural soils in recent years. It was synthesized four dissimilar biochar-based slow-release N-P-K fertilizer using nutrient impregnation technique and evaluated for nutrient release patterns, leaching behavior, yield, and soil health. Biochar prepared at 600 °C, impregnated into nutrient solution for 72 h, mixed with starch-PVA binder at 1:5 ratio to achieve an even coating followed by morpho-chemical characterization through scanning electron microscope which revealed that biochar pores appear to have locked with salt crystals of N-P-K nutrients. The highly porous microstructure of the four biochar allowed it to efficiently sorb NO3, NH4+, PO43−, and K2O and form a nutrient-impregnated SRF. The nutrient release pattern study depicted that after 90 days of leaching the NO3 released 55.47–50.84%, NH4+ 55.47–50.84%, PO43− 65.31–68.52%, and K2O 74.33–77.27%. Thus, leaching capacity was highest in NO3 followed by K2O > PO43−  > NH4+. Besides, among the four diverse biochar, the pine needle biochar (PNB) showed best nutrient retention/sorption capacity and lowest with maize stalk biochar (MSB). The SRF had lower nutrient release pattern than the fertilizer alone, demonstrating its slow-release behavior. After leaching with water equivalent to 462.18 mm rainfall (160 mL), approximately 47.60–58.27% NO3, 47.84–65.40% NH4+, and 58.05–59.07% K2O was recovered in 40–50-cm column depth which indicated that SRF retained the nutrients in upper soil column and reduced its leaching potential. It also indicated that fertilizer was mobile as compared to the SRF. Biochar slowed the downward mobility of N and K in packed soil column. But, interestingly, phosphorus movement was enhanced by SRF in column and it increased its release potential in soil column. The crop yield (2.89–8.82%) and yield attribute characters were positively increased/enhanced by the biochar-based SRF than fertilization which was highest with BGB-SRF (black gram biochar-SRF) followed by MSB-SRF, LCB-SRF (Lantana camara biochar-SRF), and PNB-SRF. The nitrogen use efficiency followed as BGB-SRF (38.3%) > MSB-SRF (37.5%) > LCB-SRF (36.2%) > PNB-SRF (35.7%) than fertilizer (22.8%). The biochar-based SRF also improved the soil quality by increasing available nutrient (5.20–15.71%), oxidizable carbon (19.01–37.18%), and decreasing soil pH (11.74–3.73%). Soil quality improvement facilitated superior maize and black gram grain nutrient uptake (24.44–5.11%). Hence, the biochar-based SRF could be used as N-P-K-based slow-release fertilizer to maximize the functions of the N-P-K fertilizer when added to a sandy soil and minimize its environmental impact.

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The author Shaon Kumar Das is thankful to the Director-ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Umiam, Meghalaya, India, and Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Palli Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati, Shantiniketan, India, for providing necessary fund and facility during the entire period of the research work.

Correspondence to Shaon Kumar Das.

The authors declare no competing interests.

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Received: 17 August 2021

Revised: 21 October 2021

Accepted: 29 October 2021

Published: 06 November 2021

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13399-021-02069-6

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Matching Gift Sample Employers | US Biochar Initiative

7 November, 2021
 

 

 

 

RESTORE FORESTS, DECARBONIZE BUILDING, AND SEQUESTER CARBON THROUGH FORESTRY, BIOMASS ENERGY, AND BIOCHAR

Building the Future from the Ground Up

A not-for-profit organization promoting the sustainable production and use of biochar through research, policy, technology and doing it!

© 2021 USBI. All rights reserved.


Salt Lake City Backyard Urban Gardens (BUG) Farms – US Biochar Initiative

7 November, 2021
 

Q What is the scale and scope of your urban farming operation?

A My partner, Kristen, and I purchased BUG Farms from some friends 3 years ago. We farm just under an acre of land distributed across eight, small backyard plots in our neighborhood in Salt Lake City. During our 22-week Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) season, we provide an average of 90 weekly vegetable shares to our members and plot-owners. Along with Kristen and I, we have several workers and volunteers each season. Over the last 3 seasons, we have been transitioning our practices toward no-till and away from reliance on deep tillage.

Q What is the soil like? Is there a lot of variability in the neighborhood? What are your top concerns about soil?

A There are some soil differences. Most areas are clay, one area has a nicer loamy soil. We also have fairly high soil pH (7.4-7.8) so we focus a lot on cover cropping and avoid salty high pH manures. We are most worried about drought so we want to build soil carbon to help retain water.

Q What made you decide to try biochar in your operation?

Both Kristen and I studied biochar in school, so we knew about Terra Preta and how biochar sequesters carbon in the soil. Back when we lived in Vermont, we knew people who had experimented with biochar. We heard GO Biochar’s John Webster on a local radio program and contacted him. He was very helpful and gave us the information we needed to get started. This was our first year using biochar. We charged it up with humates, compost, and azomite, and applied about 5 gallons for every 30 square feet in one of our worst plots with heavy clay soil.

Q What kind results did you see? Will you continue to use biochar?

A It’s just the first year, and it was not a heavy application but I will say that the plot where we applied it was terrible last year and this year it was great. Of course, we made other changes, too, because you never just change one thing when you’re farming but I think it really helped. We are definitely going to continue with biochar and use it in all of our plots next year. It is the right thing to do. We would like to incorporate better testing and diagnostic tools into our soil practices so that we can more objectively understand the state of the soils we grow in and whether our efforts are helping in any measurable way.

Q What do you mean by “the right thing to do?”

A Farming is hard on soil, even no-till farming. Yeah, we could have continued doing deep tillage and apply thousands of dollars’ worth of blood meal and feather meal to our soil to get high yields, but it wasn’t sustainable. It was taxing physically on our bodies and it does not build soil health. Even though we don’t own these plots, we have shifted our focus away from an extractive mindset of getting what you can out of this ground before we lose it, to a mentality of trying to leave the soil better than we found it. Biochar is a major component of that focus.

Farming is not just a job, it’s a lifestyle, says Zach. It can be really hard mentally and physically, and it doesn’t make all that much money. It often requires a faith in mysterious unseen forces, from tiny microbes to huge weather patterns, and an investment in things that might not payout within our short lifetimes. Kristen and I believe that the efforts we have made are paying off with better crop health and yields. We would like to continue to learn, experiment, and grow these practices, hopefully passing the knowledge and healthier soils on to the people that come after us.

RESTORE FORESTS, DECARBONIZE BUILDING, AND SEQUESTER CARBON THROUGH FORESTRY, BIOMASS ENERGY, AND BIOCHAR

Building the Future from the Ground Up

A not-for-profit organization promoting the sustainable production and use of biochar through research, policy, technology and doing it!

© 2021 USBI. All rights reserved.


DONATE TO USBI THROUGH YOUR EMPLOYER MATCH PROGRAM | US Biochar Initiative

7 November, 2021
 

Would you or an employee you know like to make a donation to USBI through your employer match program? ‘Don’t know if your employer offers such a program? Check in with your supervisor or HR representative. Below is just a sampling of the over 700 small, medium, and large organizations who offer employee match opportunities. 

RESTORE FORESTS, DECARBONIZE BUILDING, AND SEQUESTER CARBON THROUGH FORESTRY, BIOMASS ENERGY, AND BIOCHAR

Building the Future from the Ground Up

A not-for-profit organization promoting the sustainable production and use of biochar through research, policy, technology and doing it!

© 2021 USBI. All rights reserved.


Study on the Cd (II) adsorption of biochar based carbon fertilizer – Science Direct

7 November, 2021
 

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Make Your Own Biochar Using the Cone Pit Method – NewsBreak

7 November, 2021
 


Researchers test tiny machine with global potential in Jackson Demonstration State Forest …

7 November, 2021
 

The Mendocino Voice | Mendocino County, CA (https://mendovoice.com/2021/11/researchers-test-tiny-machine-with-global-potential-in-jackson-demonstration-state-forest/)

MENDOCINO Co., 11/7/21 — Scientists and engineers around the world are trying to figure out ways to mitigate future climate risks, and many have been rushing to develop technologies that reduce carbon emissions. One prototype being tested in Jackson Demonstration State Forest (JDSF) could have major implications for reducing global air pollution in the future. In the present, they’re looking for local farmers and timberland owners to work with.

The startup Takachar, based out of both India and the Bay Area, is testing a prototype for a small-scale, low-cost portable system that can turn slash, or trees cut down from logging, and agricultural residue like rice husks into products like soil amendments (biochar) to improve nutrient and water retention, biofuels as an energy solution, or chemical precursors. The goal is to incentivize loggers and farmers not to engage in polluting behavior like leaving behind or burning residue — that’s another word for biomass like slash and agricultural waste in the form of rice husks, hay straw and wood chip, for example — by turning that residue into something they can sell. The prototype can be attached to a tractor or pickup truck, which is expected to make it easier to transport and use in more remote areas.

“Most residues are often very loose, wet and bulky,” said Kevin Kung, co-founder and chief technology officer of Takachar, “so we’re talking about crop and forest residues, which often makes them very difficult to transport and centralize. So if you’re on the farm, often what you have to do is burn down residues in the open air and if it’s in a forested area, the buildup of that residue can exacerbate wildfires. So in both cases, it’s not only a waste, but also a lot of pollution that could be caused because of the burning and so forth.”

The prototype allows the residue to be processed on-site. It also lays the groundwork for self-sustaining communities that don’t need these commodities imported from elsewhere, Kung said. Kung and his co-founder Vidyut Mohan already ran one successful pilot program with almost 5,000 farmers in Kenya, where the carbon-rich fertilizer they produced increased their yields by 27%. Right now, Kung said the startup has a couple pilots running in rice paddies in India alongside the one in the Jackson State Forest in Mendocino County. They’re using this opportunity to learn how to adapt the technology so it can translate from the lab to real-world settings.

“Before, I did not know how an actual forest operation looks,” Kung said. “ We already identified some of the workflows and some of the things we have to change for the reactor. Really, just learning here are the different machine forms you have to work with in a real vegetation management setting, what these teams would normally use. Thinking about, well, if people are using this type of Bobcat, how does it load stuff? And if people are chipping things, then how can we potentially take the output of that directly into our reactor?”

This could have major implications in a lot of forestry settings. For instance, utility companies clearing brush and trees from around their power lines would have an incentive not to leave that residue behind. The startup is currently working with JDSF to process “small-diameter, non-merchantable redwood residues from their forestry operations, as well as the tanoak as an invasive species,” according to an email from the Takachar team. It has “also been working with a (Pacific Gas & Electric) chip yard near Willits to test the suitability of some of their residues that would otherwise be costly to dispose of.”

People have been putting charcoal in their soil for thousands of years and biochar from forestry in particular is known to increase the ability of the soil to hold onto nutrients, said Caroline Masiello, director of environmental science at Rice University and a biochar expert. 

“Biochar made from forestry, from wood products, is going to be extremely low in nitrogen and phosphorus,” Masiello said. “So you’re not adding a nutrient to the system, but it does add reactive surfaces to the system and those reactive surfaces do a good job of holding onto nutrients.”

Biochar can also reduce carbon dioxide emissions by turning residue that would have otherwise rapidly decomposed and turning it into something that decomposes more slowly, she said. Saw dust, for instance, is a great source for biochar because it would decompose to CO2 very rapidly but doesn’t decompose to CO2 if it’s converted to charcoal. However, Masiello said it was important to make sure the trees being used to make the biochar weren’t serving other important ecosystem services in the forest in order for that behavior to make sense as a climate risk mitigation strategy.

Takachar isn’t the first pilot program to work on biochar in JDSF. A few years ago, the Redwood Forest Foundation started up North Coast Biochar, which focused on turning removed tanoaks into biochar. That program resulted in research and policy documents supporting the expansion of similar programs.

Globally, the technology has also gotten some major attention. Takachar recently won one of the five inaugural Earthshot Prizes. That’s an award launched by Prince William intended to support projects that are addressing the climate crisis with 1 million British pounds, or just under $1.4 million. Watch the award ceremony here. “The burning of agricultural waste is one of the biggest drivers of city air pollution, but it doesn’t get the global attention the issue needs,” said Jason Knauf, CEO of the Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. “Takachar’s game-changing solution presents a way to not only eradicate the air pollution that would otherwise be created by burning, but to do so profitably in a way that benefits farmers. They have shown great leadership in one of the areas worst-hit by air pollution, which we hope will inspire others to address this urgent issue.”

The researchers are planning to demonstrate the prototype for interested members of the public in the spring. Farm and forestland owners who want to participate in the pilot program can email Kung at [email protected] or [email protected].

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I’m guardedly happy to see MIT and Takachar involved, but am concerned that they are being co-opted. Jackson Demonstration State Forestry, and, by association, Cal Fire have a huge credibility problem when it comes to convincing people that they are serious about carbon and climate change.

https://www.sfexaminer.com/news/cal-fire-timber-industry-must-face-an-inconvenient-truth/

Historic and current practices in Jackson are hardly climate-appropriate, but, rather, mobilize large amounts of carbon while degrading the carbon storage potential of the lands under their management, and elevate fire risk (which further mobilizes carbon).

Meanwhile, given that Jackson has not been able to “demonstrate” even conventional appropriate handling of slash, how will they be able to manage something far more sophisticated, at least beyond a photo-op or two? Also, the article talks about loggers “selling” the biochar and being “incentivized” to not mishandle slash, but it’s not clear how this project/technology might achieve that or how it could be cost-effective. In any case, only focusing on “small-diameter” feedstocks, isn’t going to address the massive amounts of medium- and large-diameter slash that Cal Fire is leaving in the forest.

The public deserves evidence that this little project is more than green-washing, particularly given the timing of this announcement just at the moment when JDSF’s management practices are being called into question and running into substantial public opposition.

Footnote: the article also incorrectly refers to tan oak as an invasive species that can be burned to make biochar. It is in fact a native and serves an important role in our forest.

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Home – Google Sites

7 November, 2021
 

US BioChar Initiative

International BioChar Initiative

Regeneration International

BioChar TedTalk

Another TedTalk

Biochar: The science behind the hype


New insights into the mechanisms underlying biochar-assisted sustained high-efficient co-digestion

7 November, 2021
 

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As Uses of Biochar Expand, Climate Benefits Still Uncertain (Jan 2014) – Reddit

7 November, 2021
 


按主题分类 – 中国生物工程预印本出版平台- ChinaXiv

7 November, 2021
 

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds in biochar and biochar‐amended soil: a review

Residual pollutants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and carbon (aceous) nanoparticles are inevitably generated during the pyrolysis of waste biomass and remain on the solid coproduct called biochar. Such pollutants could have adverse effects on the plant growth as well as microbial community in soil. Although biochar has been proposed as a ‘carbon negative strategy’ to mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions, the impacts of its application with respect to long-term persistence and bioavailability of hazardous components are not clear. Moreover, the co-occurrence of low molecular weight VOCs with PAHs in biochar may exert further phytotoxic effects. This review describes the basic need to unravel key mechanisms driving the storage vs. emission of these organics and the dynamics between the sorbent (biochar) and soil microbes. Moreover, there is an urgent need for standardized methods for quantitative analysis of PAHs and VOCs in biochar under environmentally relevant conditions. This review is also extended to cover current research gaps including the influence of biochar application on the short- and long-term fate of PAHs and VOCs and the proper control tactics for biochar quality and associated risk.

Residual pollutants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and carbon (aceous) nanoparticles are inevitably generated during the pyrolysis of waste biomass and remain on the solid coproduct called biochar. Such pollutants could have adverse effects on the plant growth as well as microbial community in soil. Although biochar has been proposed as a ‘carbon negative strategy’ to mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions, the impacts of its application with respect to long-term persistence and bioavailability of hazardous components are not clear. Moreover, the co-occurrence of low molecular weight VOCs with PAHs in biochar may exert further phytotoxic effects. This review describes the basic need to unravel key mechanisms driving the storage vs. emission of these organics and the dynamics between the sorbent (biochar) and soil microbes. Moreover, there is an urgent need for standardized methods for quantitative analysis of PAHs and VOCs in biochar under environmentally relevant conditions. This review is also extended to cover current research gaps including the influence of biochar application on the short- and long-term fate of PAHs and VOCs and the proper control tactics for biochar quality and associated risk.

提交时间: 2016-05-04 点击量1276下载量773评论 0


What is the absolute simplest way to make biochar? – Reddit

7 November, 2021
 


Water service commits to 'net zero' – Bayside News

8 November, 2021
 

SOUTH East Water has committed to net zero emissions by 2050 at the latest.

Australia’s climate policy has been the subject of much discussion in recent times, with Prime Minister Scott Morrison having just returned from the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow. A “plan” to achieve net zero emissions by 2050 was agreed to by the federal government last month, but key modelling was not released.

South East Water, which is based out of Frankston, says it is on track to reach net zero emissions by 2050, and would look into ways to reach it by 2030.

South East Water managing director Lara Olsen has acknowledged that companies in the water industry are big emitters worldwide. “The water industry is a huge contributor to carbon emissions across the globe, but also at the forefront of trying to minimise the impacts of our operations. We use significant amounts of electricity to deliver fresh clean water and to treat waste water that gets flushed down the drain, but we also understand our obligation and duty to protect our environment and water sources,” she said.

“COP26 brings together some of the most innovative brains on the planet, but there are home grown innovations and projects which also reduce our emissions. Using emerging technology our biosolid to biochar collaboration reduces the emissions used to transport the product for agricultural use. By adopting a circular economy approach and embracing innovation, technology and research we can achieve huge benefits for our environment, customers and community.

“We’re focused on creating a better world for our customers now, and for future generations. Net zero emissions are a key part of this and we’re proud to be joining others across the globe to help deliver this target.”

South East Water has committed to installing solar panels at water recycling plants, installing a combined heat and power unit running on biogas produced with organic matter to provide 40 per cent of power to its Mt Martha water recycling plant, upgrading the Boneo water recycling plant to “generate and capture biogas reducing the electricity needed to treat wastewater”, introducing hybrid vehicles, and purchasing around 10,000 MWh of renewable energy from Kiamal Solar Farm every year.

First published in the Frankston Times – 9 November 2021

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Patriot Hydrogen signs green hydrogen MoU with KCE | Energy Global

8 November, 2021
 

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Published by , Editorial Assistant
Energy Global, Monday, 08 November 2021 10:30

Patriot Hydrogen Ltd (Patriot Hydrogen) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Western Australia’s Kimberley Clean Energy (KCE) to supply 75 of Patriot’s P2H modular power generation units.

Patriot Hydrogen is collaborating with Singaporean company CAC-H2, the lead technology provider, which has acquired 25% of the company to help build out the business. This supports Patriot Hydrogen’s projects to develop, build and commission Waste to Energy Plants – Patriot to Hydrogen (P2H) units.

KCE, based in Broome in Western Australia’s Kimberley region, has signed an MoU for 75 P2H units. These units will support KCE’s plans to develop baseload renewable energy, green hydrogen and fertilizer to support a cleaner future for the Kimberley region. It will also support existing businesses at Kilto Station, owned by KCE co-founder, Jack Burton, who has recently started a small abattoir to be the only operational facility in the north of Western Australia.

The Patriot P2H units will be used to power the Kilto abattoir and provide power for the other activities carried out by the group. KCE has planned to decarbonise the entire value chain of their operation. It will then seek a supply contract for energy across the Kimberley over the next five years.

The first unit will be deployed at Kilto Station and will be used to operate the abattoir, irrigation and homestead complex and assist in diverting a waste stream into a fertilizer product for the irrigation and farming lands.

The units are based on proprietary technology provided by CAC-H2, including components such as the in-feed system, discharge system for the produced biochar, recovery, and cleaning of produced syngas suitable for immediate input to fuelled generator equipment. CAC-H2 will be the exclusive technical and mechanical advisor and supplier for the modular, portable P2H units, which are designed to produce syngas, hydrogen, green energy, and biochar throughout Australia.

Patriot and CAC-H2 have engaged Liberty Energy Capital to work as advisors to raise money for working capital in pre-IPO funding. Liberty is co-ordinating to raise funds through its advisors along with developing a strategy to list Patriot on a suitable securities exchange either in Australia, Canada, or the US.

Patriot also has plans to develop further hydrogen assets with emerging renewables player Sweetman Renewables. Sweetman Renewables also entered a joint venture (JV) with CAC-H2 to establish one of Australia’s first wood-fed hydrogen production plants, and one of the country’s largest green bio-hydrogen production eco-hubs.

The hydrogen production centre of excellence to be called Hunter Valley One will be built on a 30-acre site adjacent to Sweetman Renewables’ Millfield timber mill.

Patriot is positioning to capitalise on renewable bioenergy to service growing demand into the future with key partnerships. The company aims to use state-of-the-art technology to lead companies in the transition to a sustainable energy strategy while cutting costs by making renewable hydrogen a mobile, efficient, and accessible power source.

As major economies around the world rapidly shift to renewable energy sources as they strive to meet zero emissions targets, Patriot forecasts a growing need for its P2H units well into the future.

The Autumn issue of Energy Global features a varied spectrum of in-depth technical articles detailing recent projects, future projections, and technological advancements in the renewables sector, from companies including MISTRAS Group, Fugro, X1 Wind, Sulzer, and more.

Statkraft recorded a strong EBIT in 3Q2021, strengthening the company’s financial capacity and ability to deliver on its growth strategy.

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Biochar Fertilizer Market with Covid-19 Pandemic Analysis, Growth Rate, New Trend …

8 November, 2021
 

The Latest Released Biochar Fertilizer market study has evaluated the future growth potential of Global Biochar Fertilizer market and provides information and useful stats on market structure and size. The report is intended to provide market intelligence and strategic insights to help decision makers take sound investment decisions and identify potential gaps and growth opportunities. Additionally, the report also identifies and analyses changing dynamics, emerging trends along with essential drivers, challenges, opportunities and restraints in Biochar Fertilizer market. The study includes market share analysis and profiles of players such as Biogrow Limited, Biochar Farms, Anulekh, GreenBack, Carbon Fertilizer, Global Harvest Organics LLC

Click to get SAMPLE PDF (Including Full TOC, Table & Figures): https://www.datalabforecast.com/request-sample/232158-biochar-fertilizer-market

North America is expected to hold dominant position in the global Biochar Fertilizer market, owing to increasing collaboration activities by key players over the forecast period.

Furthermore, the COVID-19 pandemic has contrarily affected the worldwide Biochar Fertilizer market. Many organizations in the Biochar Fertilizer market are compelled to end their assembling and creation activities, attributable to spread of the infection. Additionally, business activities have been stopped, attributable to new government decisions, which straightforwardly impacts income float of the Biochar Fertilizer market.

If you are a Biochar Fertilizer manufacturer and would like to check or understand policy and regulatory proposal, designing clear explanations of the stakes, potential winners and losers, and options for improvement then this article will help you understand the pattern with Impacting Trends.

Major Highlights of the Biochar Fertilizer Market report released by DLF

Market Breakdown by Product:

⇛ Organic Fertilizer, Inorganic Fertilizer, Compound Fertilizer.

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⇛ Cereals, Oil Crops, Fruits and Vegetables, Others.

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Revenue and Sales Estimation — Historical Revenue and sales volume is presented and further data is triangulated with top-down and bottom-up approaches to forecast complete market size and to estimate forecast numbers for key regions covered in the report along with classified and well recognized Types and end-use industry.

SWOT Analysis on Biochar Fertilizer Players

In additional Market Share analysis of players, in-depth profiling, product/service and business overview, the study also concentrates on BCG matrix, heat map analysis, FPNV positioning along with SWOT analysis to better correlate market competitiveness.

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Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) Market Size and Analysis | Leading Keyplayers – LSMedia

8 November, 2021
 

New Jersey, United States,- The research study presented in this report offers complete and intelligent analysis of the competition, segmentation, dynamics, and geographical advancement of the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) Market. It takes into account the CAGR, value, volume, revenue, production, consumption, sales, manufacturing cost, prices, and other key factors related to the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market. The authors of the report have segmented the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market as per product, application, and region. Segments of the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market are analyzed on the basis of market share, production, consumption, revenue, CAGR, market size, and more factors. The analysts have profiled leading players of the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market, keeping in view their recent developments, market share, sales, revenue, areas covered, product portfolios, and other aspects.

The comparative results provided in the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) report allow readers to understand the difference between players and how they are competing against each other. The research study gives a detailed view of current and future trends and opportunities of the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market. Market dynamics such as drivers and restraints are explained in the most detailed and easiest manner possible with the use of tables and graphs. Interested parties are expected to find important recommendations to improve their business in the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market.

Get | Download Sample Copy with TOC, Graphs & List of Figures @ https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/download-sample/?rid=93156

The report covers extensive analysis of the key market players in the market, along with their business overview, expansion plans, and strategies. The key players studied in the report include:

• AAK
• IOI Loders Croklaan
• Wilmar International
• Fuji Oil
• Olam International
• Cargill
• Mewah Group
• 3F Industries Ltd
• Nisshin Oillio Group
• Ltd
• Manorama Group
• Felda Iffco
• Musim Mas
• Intercontinental Specialty Fats (ISF)

The segmental analysis includes deep evaluation of each and every segment of the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market studied in the report. All of the segments of the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market are analyzed on the basis of market share, revenue, market size, production, and future prospects. The regional study of the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market explains how different regions and country-level markets are making developments. Furthermore, it gives a statistical representation of their progress during the course of the forecast period. Our analysts have used advanced primary and secondary research methodologies to compile the research study on the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market.

Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) Market Segmentation

By the product type, the market is primarily split into:

• Shea Butter
• Palm and Palm Kernel Oil
• Sal Fat
• Kokum Butter
• Mango Butter

By the application, this report covers the following segments:

• Confectionery
• Food & Beverage
• Others

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Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) Market Report Scope

Geographic Segment Covered in the Report:

The Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) report provides information about the market area, which is further subdivided into sub-regions and countries/regions. In addition to the market share in each country and sub-region, this chapter of this report also contains information on profit opportunities. This chapter of the report mentions the market share and growth rate of each region, country and sub-region during the estimated period. 

 • North America (USA and Canada)
 • Europe (UK, Germany, France and the rest of Europe)
 • Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, and the rest of the Asia Pacific region)
 • Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, and the rest of Latin America)
 • Middle East and Africa (GCC and rest of the Middle East and Africa)

Key questions answered in the report:

 • What is the growth potential of the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market?
 • Which product segment will take the lion’s share?
 • Which regional market will emerge as a pioneer in the years to come?
 • Which application segment will experience strong growth?
 • What growth opportunities might arise in the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) industry in the years to come?
 • What are the most significant challenges that the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market could face in the future?
 • Who are the leading companies on the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market?
 • What are the main trends that are positively impacting the growth of the market?
 • What growth strategies are the players considering to stay in the Cocoa Butter Replacer (CBR) market?

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Charcoal business heats up thanks to grant support | Bdaily

8 November, 2021
 

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A Shropshire charcoal business is expanding into an innovative new market with help from a series of programmes supported by the Marches Local Enterprise Partnership.

Caradoc Charcoal – which was formed in 2019 by directors Charlotte Smith and Kevin Fryer – has earned a national reputation for the quality of the charcoal it produces at its base in the Stretton Hills.

Now the company is also selling a by-product of the charcoal manufacturing process called biochar as a soil improver and animal feed after receiving a package of help through the Marches LEP and its business support service, the Marches Growth Hub.

The company, from Leebotwood, near Shrewsbury, was awarded £10,000 from the Small Equipment Grant Scheme to help purchase a special sifting machine to grade the biochar into usable sizes.

The grant also helped buy a bagging and weighing machine to upgrade their existing system, enabling them to bag both their charcoal products and new biochar products.

Alongside the Small Equipment Grant, the company was also supported by the Energy and Bioproducts Research Institute (EBRI) based at Aston University which ran extensive tests on its biochar products to ensure they met the required standards for use.

EBRI offers help for businesses in the Marches to develop low carbon products and services from redundant material, such as manufacturing, agricultural, packaging, food and drink waste.

And it also received help from CREST – The Centre for Research into Environmental Science and Technology at University Centre Shrewsbury – which carried out detailed research into the biochar, including the cost of processing, use of additives as a binding agent and market interest in the product. Research is now continuing to explore if the addition of biochar has an impact on milk yield/quality and cow/calf health.

CREST provides research and innovation support to small and medium enterprises across Shropshire and Telford & Wrekin to develop and test new products, processes or services which relate to the environmental science and technology sector.

All the programmes are supported by the Marches LEP and Marches Growth Hub as part of their business support programme, and receive European Regional Development Fund assistance.

Charlotte Smith said the Small Equipment Grant and research help meant the company had been able to take on a new member of staff and bring the new biochar product to market.

“The help we have received through the grant scheme and the other programmes has made a huge difference to our development. We produce a high-quality 100 per cent natural product, with a minimal carbon footprint, which has big environmental advantages over much of the imported charcoal used in this country.

“This help means that even our bi-product can be put to an environmentally-productive use, improving the soil and even neutralising methane in animals’ stomachs when it is introduced to their feed.”

Rachel Laver, Marches LEP chief executive, said Caradoc Charcoal was an excellent example of the positive benefits of accessing support available through schemes promoted by the Marches Growth Hub.

“The hub has access to a huge range of support, advice and funding and can help businesses of all sizes and sectors meet their ambitions to grow. The support that Cardoc Charcoal has received through a variety of programmes is a small indication of what we can offer.”

Small Equipment Grant programme manager Caroline Cattle said Caradoc Charcoal was the latest success story for the scheme.

“The Small Equipment Grant is helping companies across the Marches purchase the machinery they need to grow and we would urge any business in the region which meets the criteria to investigate how it can help them.”

Grants of between £1,000 and £10,000 are available under the programme, which is open to small and medium-sized companies across Herefordshire, Shropshire and Telford & Wrekin.

The grant is available as a contribution of up to 50 per cent and primarily covers B2B companies. Items purchased must exceed £500 in value and have a life expectancy of three years. Eligible projects must lead to the creation of at least one part-time job within six months of the creation of a new product or service to be used by other businesses.

Because of restrictions imposed by the ERDF, the scheme is not available to retail businesses, restaurants, drinking establishments and fast food takeaways, online retail or rental businesses, farms involved in primary production, or local social welfare facilities.

Details of the scheme are available through the Marches Growth Hub.

Herefordshire Council is the accountable body for the scheme.

This was posted in Bdaily’s Members’ News section by Vicky .


Soil study shows why nitrous oxide emissions should factor into climate change mitigation …

8 November, 2021
 

AMES, Iowa – Poorly drained agricultural soils emit enough of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide that the resulting climate change effects could far exceed the benefits of using the same soils as a means of sequestering carbon, according to a recently published scientific study.

The study, published Monday in the academic journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that a range of agricultural soils produce nitrous oxide emissions in quantities big enough to contribute to climate change. The researchers compared soils with various moisture content and found agricultural soils are capable of high nitrous oxide emissions across a wide range of environmental conditions.

Nitrous oxide has 298 times the warming potential of carbon dioxide over 100 years, according to previous research, suggesting that climate change mitigation efforts must account for nitrous oxide, said Steven Hall, an associate professor of ecology, evolution and organismal biology at Iowa State University and the study’s senior author.

“In this study, we show that the climate warming effects of nitrous oxide emissions from local corn and soybean soils are two-fold greater than the climate cooling that might be achieved by increasing soil carbon storage with common agricultural practices,” Hall said.

Researchers, farmers and policymakers are considering strategies that might encourage producers to store carbon, also a greenhouse gas, in the soil, where it can’t contribute to climate change. Hall said storing carbon in agricultural soils is a valuable tactic to mitigate climate change, but the new research indicates any such policies should first take into account nitrous oxide emissions. Failure to do so could result in policies that are much less effective in addressing climate change.

Instead, Hall said management plans also should encourage nitrous oxide mitigation strategies in concert with carbon sequestration. Examples of such strategies include more precise and efficient use of nitrogen fertilizer. New products known as enhanced efficiency fertilizers, as well as the application of biochar to fields, might also help to limit nitrous oxide emissions.

Microorganisms in the soil give off nitrous oxide as a byproduct as they cycle nitrogen. Nitrogen stimulates nitrous oxide production, so adding nitrogen fertilizers to soil tends to result in more emissions.

“If we want to maximize our climate benefit, we want to be strategic about it,” Hall said. “We’re not simply going to flip the switch on climate just by putting more carbon in the soil. Nitrous oxide emissions need to be a priority as well.”

Hall and his fellow researchers developed a new means of measuring nitrous oxide emissions from corn and soybean fields to help gather data for the study. The scientists tweaked previously existing technologies to measure nitrous oxide emissions every four hours. The technology utilizes small containers placed at various locations on top of the soil of ISU research farms in central Iowa. The containers pump air samples into a central shed where an analyzer automatically measures nitrous oxide content. This method hadn’t been used before to measure nitrous oxide, and Hall said the researchers had to design the system to withstand the wet conditions often present in agricultural fields.   

Hall’s coauthors include Nathaniel Lawrence, an ISU graduate student in ecology, evolution and organismal biology; Carlos Tenesaca, a research scientist in ecology, evolution and organismal biology; and Andy VanLoocke, an associate professor of agronomy.

Steven Hall, Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, 515-294-7650, stevenjh@iastate.edu
Fred Love, News Service, 515-294-0704, fredlove@iastate.edu

A newly published study found that a range of agricultural soils produce nitrous oxide emissions in sufficient quantities to contribute to climate change. The researchers compared soils with various moisture content and found agricultural soils are capable of high nitrous oxide emissions across a wide range of environmental conditions.

“If we want to maximize our climate benefit, we want to be strategic about it. We’re not simply going to flip the switch on climate just by putting more carbon in the soil. Nitrous oxide emissions need to be a priority as well.”

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Full article: Effect of biochar on the form transformation of heavy metals in paddy soil under …

8 November, 2021
 

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8 November, 2021
 

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Uranium removal from laboratory and environmental waters by oxidised biochar prepared …

8 November, 2021
 

The removal of uranium from laboratory and environmental waters using oxidised biochar prepared from palm tree fibres has been investigated by means of batch type experiments. The effect of pH, contact time, temperature and initial uranium concentration has been studied and indicated that the adsorption follows the second order kinetic model and is an endothermic, entropy-driven process. According to the IR spectra the adsorption occurs via formation of inner-sphere complex formation between the surface carboxylic moieties and UO22+. The material has been effectively applied to remove uranium from groundwater, treated wastewater and seawater samples.

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Correspondence to Ioannis Pashalidis.

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Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Received: 17 August 2021

Accepted: 21 October 2021

Published: 08 November 2021

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10967-021-08076-1

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Place Order | Global Biochar Fertilizer Market Insights, Forecast to 2027

8 November, 2021
 


Charcoal business heats up thanks to grant support

8 November, 2021
 

A Shropshire charcoal business is expanding into an innovative new market with help from a series of programmes supported by the Marches Local Enterprise Partnership.

Caradoc Charcoal – which was formed in 2019 by directors Charlotte Smith and Kevin Fryer – has earned a national reputation for the quality of the charcoal it produces at its base in the Stretton Hills.

Now the company is also selling a by-product of the charcoal manufacturing process called biochar as a soil improver and animal feed after receiving a package of help through the Marches LEP and its business support service, the Marches Growth Hub.

The company, from Leebotwood, near Shrewsbury, was awarded £10,000 from the Small Equipment Grant Scheme to help purchase a special sifting machine to grade the biochar into usable sizes.

The grant also helped buy a bagging and weighing machine to upgrade their existing system, enabling them to bag both their charcoal products and new biochar products.

Alongside the Small Equipment Grant, the company was also supported by the Energy and Bioproducts Research Institute (EBRI) based at Aston University which ran extensive tests on its biochar products to ensure they met the required standards for use.

EBRI offers help for businesses in the Marches to develop low carbon products and services from redundant material, such as manufacturing, agricultural, packaging, food and drink waste.

And it also received help from CREST – The Centre for Research into Environmental Science and Technology at University Centre Shrewsbury – which carried out detailed research into the biochar, including the cost of processing, use of additives as a binding agent and market interest in the product. Research is now continuing to explore if the addition of biochar has an impact on milk yield/quality and cow/calf health.

CREST provides research and innovation support to small and medium enterprises across Shropshire and Telford & Wrekin to develop and test new products, processes or services which relate to the environmental science and technology sector.

All the programmes are supported by the Marches LEP and Marches Growth Hub as part of their business support programme, and receive European Regional Development Fund assistance.

Charlotte Smith said the Small Equipment Grant and research help meant the company had been able to take on a new member of staff and bring the new biochar product to market.

“The help we have received through the grant scheme and the other programmes has made a huge difference to our development. We produce a high-quality 100 per cent natural product, with a minimal carbon footprint, which has big environmental advantages over much of the imported charcoal used in this country.

“This help means that even our bi-product can be put to an environmentally-productive use, improving the soil and even neutralising methane in animals’ stomachs when it is introduced to their feed.”

Rachel Laver, Marches LEP chief executive, said Caradoc Charcoal was an excellent example of the positive benefits of accessing support available through schemes promoted by the Marches Growth Hub.

“The hub has access to a huge range of support, advice and funding and can help businesses of all sizes and sectors meet their ambitions to grow. The support that Cardoc Charcoal has received through a variety of programmes is a small indication of what we can offer.”

Small Equipment Grant programme manager Caroline Cattle said Caradoc Charcoal was the latest success story for the scheme.

“The Small Equipment Grant is helping companies across the Marches purchase the machinery they need to grow and we would urge any business in the region which meets the criteria to investigate how it can help them.”

Grants of between £1,000 and £10,000 are available under the programme, which is open to small and medium-sized companies across Herefordshire, Shropshire and Telford & Wrekin.

The grant is available as a contribution of up to 50 per cent and primarily covers B2B companies. Items purchased must exceed £500 in value and have a life expectancy of three years. Eligible projects must lead to the creation of at least one part-time job within six months of the creation of a new product or service to be used by other businesses.

Because of restrictions imposed by the ERDF, the scheme is not available to retail businesses, restaurants, drinking establishments and fast food takeaways, online retail or rental businesses, farms involved in primary production, or local social welfare facilities.
Details of the scheme are available through the Marches Growth Hub.

Herefordshire Council is the accountable body for the scheme.


Global Biochar Market 2021 – Top Key Players Analysis Report – Article Pedia

8 November, 2021
 

The Biochar Market 2021 research report gives emerging industry data, global segments and regional outlook. This report covers up all details such as size, share, value, growth, restraints, and opportunities for the year 2020 to 2027. The report generated using various analysis tools like porter’s five forces model, market attractiveness and value chain. The report gives comprehensive review of the global market helping to club revenue generation and profitable business to transform client’s success.

The research report also covers the comprehensive profiles of the key players in the market and an in-depth view of the competitive landscape worldwide. The major players in the biochar market include Agri-Tech Producers, LLC, Diacarbon Energy Inc., Biochar Products, Inc., Cool Planet Energy Systems Inc., Vega Biofuels, Inc., The Biochar Company, Phoenix Energy, Biochar Supreme, LLC, Pacific Pyrolysis, ArSta Eco, Earth Systems PTY. LTD. And Others. This section includes a holistic view of the competitive landscape that includes various strategic developments such as key mergers & acquisitions, future capacities, partnerships, financial overviews, collaborations, new product developments, new product launches, and other developments.

Get more information on “Global Biochar Market Research Report” by requesting FREE Sample Copy at https://www.valuemarketresearch.com/contact/biochar-market/download-sample

Market Dynamics

The market is primarily driven by the rising agriculture industry across the globe. Growing demand for organic food products coupled with the rising need for enhancing soil fertility and crop growth is augmenting the demand for biochar in agriculture activities. Apart from this, rising urbanization in emerging economies has a positive impact on biochar market growth. In addition to this, rising demand from the construction as it is used as insulation, manufacturing food packaging material and as feed supplement is accelerating the overall growth. However, lack of awareness among consumers may hamper the market.

The report covers Porter’s Five Forces Model, Market Attractiveness Analysis and Value Chain analysis. These tools help to get a clear picture of the industry’s structure and evaluate the competition attractiveness at a global level.

Additionally, these tools also give inclusive assessment of each application/product segment in the global market of biochar.

Browse Global Biochar Market Research Report with detailed TOC at https://www.valuemarketresearch.com/report/biochar-market

Market Segmentation

The entire biochar market has been sub-categorized into technology and application. The report provides an analysis of these subsets with respect to the geographical segmentation. This research study will keep marketer informed and helps to identify the target demographics for a product or service.

By Technology

By Application

Regional Analysis

This section covers regional segmentation which accentuates on current and future demand for biochar market across North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Middle East & Africa. Further, the report focuses on demand for individual application segment across all the prominent regions.

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8 November, 2021
 

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Green hydrogen joint venture forms between Patriot and CAC-H2

8 November, 2021
 

Patriot Hydrogen Ltd., an Australian start-up, has signed a green hydrogen joint venture agreement with CAC-H2 Pte Ltd. of Singapore.

CAC-H2 will be Patriot Hydrogen’s leading technology provider as it supports the start-up’s projects for the development, construction and commissioning of Waste to Energy Plants using its Patriot to Hydrogen (P2H) green hydrogen units. The Singaporean firm will become the exclusive mechanical and technical advisor for the P2H units as well as the supplier.

The P2H units were developed for the production of H2, clean energy, syngas, and biochar throughout Australia. They are modular units, making them portable so that they can be easily moved, transported and used where needed.

The P2H units were designed using CAC-H2 proprietary technology, including components such as both the in-feed and discharge systems for the biochar it can produced, as well as the recovery and cleaning components used when syngas is produced for immediate fuelled generator equipment input.

The companies have together engaged Liberty Energy Capital to work as advisors in raising working capital funds in pre-IPO funding. Furthermore, that firm will also be responsible for the coordination of raising funds by way of its advisors and to develop the strategy necessary for Patriot Hydrogen’s path to going public on a suitable securities exchange in Australia or either Canada or the United States.

What is Green Hydrogen? – Click to learn more about renewable H2

Major economies worldwide are increasingly turning to renewable energy sources such as green hydrogen as they aim to decarbonize and meet their climate targets in coming decades. COP26 has specifically placed clean H2 in the spotlight as world leaders discuss and enhance commitments to a decarbonized future. This trend is only underscored as oil giants worldwide such as Woodside and BP have announced their own strategies focusing on H2 as a cleaner source of fuel for everything from transport to industry.

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Biochar Market To Surpass Valuation Of US$ 6.3 Bn By 2031 – snehal kasat

8 November, 2021
 

Biochar Market: Introduction

Transparency Market Research delivers key insights on the global biochar market. In terms of revenue, the biochar market is estimated to expand at a CAGR of 15.35% during the forecast period, owing to numerous factors regarding which TMR offers thorough insights and forecasts in its report on the biochar market.

Environmental benefits and advantages associated with biochar are creating lucrative opportunities for the biochar market across the globe. The demand for electricity is expected to continue to rise across the globe during the forecast period. The world is focusing on renewable energy, such as biomass, to cater to the high demand for electricity. Renewable power generation increased by an approximately 7.4% in 2019, highest as compared to last five years. Production of renewable electricity stood at 2537 GW in 2019.

Request For Sample:https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=S&rep_id=2863

Biochar Market: Dynamics

Soil degradation is a major concern in the agriculture sector across the globe. Significant investments and technological advancements have been made for the development of innovative solutions in order to enhance soil quality. Biochar is a highly attractive solution, as it offers various features. It enhances soil structure, increases water retention and aggregation, decreases acidity, reduces nitrous oxide emissions, improves microbial properties, regulates nitrogen leaching, and improves porosity.

Biochar is also found to be beneficial for composting, since it reduces greenhouse gas emissions and prevents the loss of nutrients in the compost material. It also promotes microbial activity. This accelerates the composting process. These features of biochar are expected to boost its demand during the forecast period.

The lack of awareness about the application of biochar is a significant factor hampering the biochar market. Biochar is still considered as charcoal, which carries risks in terms of environment pollution. Consumers have to be made aware about the potential of biochar as well as its wide applications.

Buy Now :https://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/checkout.php?rep_id=2863<ype=S

Technological limitation is a major constraint associated with the production as well as application of biochar. Research and development are currently under progress to check the feasibility of the best technology to achieve maximum productivity at less cost. Thus, lack of awareness and technological limitations are expected to restrain the biochar market during the forecast period.

Biochar Market: Prominent Regions

In terms of value, Asia Pacific is projected to account for a major share of the global biochar market during the forecast period. This can be ascribed to the rise in the demand for biochar in applications such as agriculture, forestry, electricity generation, and others. Increase in demand for biochar in end-use industries, rise in usage of biochar as feedstock, growth in organic farming, and surge in usage in waste management materials are driving the biochar market in Asia Pacific.

Explore Transparency Market Research’s award-winning coverage of the global Industry: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/electrification-measures-across-various-regions-and-booming-construction-sector-to-bring-great-growth-opportunities-for-distribution-board-market-between-2019-and-2027-tmr-301171784.html

The rapid growth of the biochar market in Europe can be ascribed to strong government initiatives and regulatory policies. Countries such the U.K., Switzerland, and Australia hold high share of the biochar market in Europe. This trend is expected to continue during the forecast period. The biochar market in Europe is anticipated to expand at a rapid pace during the forecast period, as the region is an emerging market for applications such as animal husbandry.

North America is a one of the key regions of the global biochar market. The U.S. held a large share of the biochar market in North America in 2020. The growth of the market in the country can be ascribed to soil remediation and rising demand for organic food. The biochar market in the U.S. is anticipated to expand at a rapid pace during the forecast period.

The biochar market in Latin America is expanding due to increase in electricity generation from biomass and organic farming. The biochar market is anticipated to expand at a significant pace in the region, owing to the rise in the demand for waste management in biomass and biofuel sectors. Brazil is predicted to be a lucrative country of the biochar market in the near future.

Biochar Market: Key Players

Key players operating in the global biochar market are Genesis Industries, Black Owl Biochar, Biochar Now, Airex Énergie Inc., Phoenix Energy, American BioChar, Bioforcetech Corporation, ECOERA, PYROPOWER, and ETIA S.A.S.

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按机构 – 中国生物工程预印本出版平台- ChinaXiv

8 November, 2021
 

A model for mechanistic and system assessments of biochar effects on soils and crops and trade‐offs

We developed a biochar model within the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM) software that integrates biochar knowledge and enables simulation of biochar effects within cropping systems. The model has algorithms that mechanistically connect biochar to soil organic carbon (SOC), soil water, bulk density (BD), pH, cation exchange capacity, and organic and mineral nitrogen. Soil moisture (SW)–temperature–nitrogen limitations on the rate of biochar decomposition were included as well as biochar-induced priming effect on SOC mineralization. The model has 10 parameters that capture the diversity of biochar types, 15 parameters that address biochar-soil interactions and 4 constants. The range of values and their sensitivity is reported. The biochar model was connected to APSIM’s maize and wheat crop models to investigate long-term (30 years) biochar effects on US maize and Australia wheat in various soils. Results from this sensitivity analysis showed that the effect of biochar was the largest in a sandy soil (Australian wheat) and the smallest in clay loam soil (US maize). On average across cropping systems and soils the order of sensitivity and the magnitude of the response of biochar to various soil-plant processes was (from high to low): SOC (11% to 86%) > N2O emissions (−10% to 43%43%) > plant available water content (0.6% to 12.9%) > BD (−6.5% to −1.7%) > pH (−0.8% to 6.3%) > net N mineralization (−19% to 10%) > CO2 emissions (−2.0% to 4.3%) > water filled pore space (−3.7% to 3.4%) > grain yield (−3.3% to 1.8%) > biomass (−1.6% to 1.4%). Our analysis showed that biochar has a larger impact on environmental outcomes rather than agricultural production. The mechanistic model has the potential to optimize biochar application strategies to enhance environmental and agronomic outcomes but more work is needed to fill knowledge gaps identified in this work.

We developed a biochar model within the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM) software that integrates biochar knowledge and enables simulation of biochar effects within cropping systems. The model has algorithms that mechanistically connect biochar to soil organic carbon (SOC), soil water, bulk density (BD), pH, cation exchange capacity, and organic and mineral nitrogen. Soil moisture (SW)–temperature–nitrogen limitations on the rate of biochar decomposition were included as well as biochar-induced priming effect on SOC mineralization. The model has 10 parameters that capture the diversity of biochar types, 15 parameters that address biochar-soil interactions and 4 constants. The range of values and their sensitivity is reported. The biochar model was connected to APSIM’s maize and wheat crop models to investigate long-term (30 years) biochar effects on US maize and Australia wheat in various soils. Results from this sensitivity analysis showed that the effect of biochar was the largest in a sandy soil (Australian wheat) and the smallest in clay loam soil (US maize). On average across cropping systems and soils the order of sensitivity and the magnitude of the response of biochar to various soil-plant processes was (from high to low): SOC (11% to 86%) > N2O emissions (−10% to 43%43%) > plant available water content (0.6% to 12.9%) > BD (−6.5% to −1.7%) > pH (−0.8% to 6.3%) > net N mineralization (−19% to 10%) > CO2 emissions (−2.0% to 4.3%) > water filled pore space (−3.7% to 3.4%) > grain yield (−3.3% to 1.8%) > biomass (−1.6% to 1.4%). Our analysis showed that biochar has a larger impact on environmental outcomes rather than agricultural production. The mechanistic model has the potential to optimize biochar application strategies to enhance environmental and agronomic outcomes but more work is needed to fill knowledge gaps identified in this work.

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Kimberley Beef Producer Signs MOU for 75+ Patriot Hydrogen Units

8 November, 2021
 

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Carbon Captors

8 November, 2021
 


Figure 3 | Assessing the Potential of Biochar for Improving Soil Physical Properties and Tree Growth

8 November, 2021
 

Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.


carbon-standards.com – Aktuelles

8 November, 2021
 

Data protection regulations

Our website uses Cookies – to provide you with the best possible user experience. When you go on surfing on our website, you agree with our data protection regulations.

The EASY-CERT group AG, the Ithaka Institute and the European Biochar Industry Consortium have jointly established Carbon Standards International AG. 

This provides a professional basis for keeping step with the rapid development of the European Biochar Certificate (EBC), continuing to provide you with high-quality EBC standards and guidelines, delivering the best certification services, extending certification packages to new sectors and shaping the anticipated development of the carbon sinks sector from a leading position.

You can find more information here.

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Tel. +41 (0) 62 552 10 90
info@carbon-standards.com


Soil study shows why nitrous oxide emissions | EurekAlert!

9 November, 2021
 

image: Steven Hall, pictured, and his fellow researchers developed a new means of measuring nitrous oxide emissions from corn and soybean fields to help gather data for the study. The scientists tweaked previously existing technologies to measure nitrous oxide emissions every four hours. view more 

AMES, Iowa – Poorly drained agricultural soils emit enough of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide that the resulting climate change effects could far exceed the benefits of using the same soils as a means of sequestering carbon, according to a recently published scientific study.

The study, published Monday in the academic journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that a range of agricultural soils produce nitrous oxide emissions in quantities big enough to contribute to climate change. The researchers compared soils with various moisture content and found agricultural soils are capable of high nitrous oxide emissions across a wide range of environmental conditions.

Nitrous oxide has 298 times the warming potential of carbon dioxide over 100 years, according to previous research, suggesting that climate change mitigation efforts must account for nitrous oxide, said Steven Hall, an associate professor of ecology, evolution and organismal biology at Iowa State University and the study’s senior author.

“In this study, we show that the climate warming effects of nitrous oxide emissions from local corn and soybean soils are two-fold greater than the climate cooling that might be achieved by increasing soil carbon storage with common agricultural practices,” Hall said.

Researchers, farmers and policymakers are considering strategies that might encourage producers to store carbon, also a greenhouse gas, in the soil, where it can’t contribute to climate change. Hall said storing carbon in agricultural soils is a valuable tactic to mitigate climate change, but the new research indicates any such policies should first take into account nitrous oxide emissions. Failure to do so could result in policies that are much less effective in addressing climate change.

Instead, Hall said management plans also should encourage nitrous oxide mitigation strategies in concert with carbon sequestration. Examples of such strategies include more precise and efficient use of nitrogen fertilizer. New products known as enhanced efficiency fertilizers, as well as the application of biochar to fields, might also help to limit nitrous oxide emissions.

Microorganisms in the soil give off nitrous oxide as a byproduct as they cycle nitrogen. Nitrogen stimulates nitrous oxide production, so adding nitrogen fertilizers to soil tends to result in more emissions.

“If we want to maximize our climate benefit, we want to be strategic about it,” Hall said. “We’re not simply going to flip the switch on climate just by putting more carbon in the soil. Nitrous oxide emissions need to be a priority as well.”

Hall and his fellow researchers developed a new means of measuring nitrous oxide emissions from corn and soybean fields to help gather data for the study. The scientists tweaked previously existing technologies to measure nitrous oxide emissions every four hours. The technology utilizes small containers placed at various locations on top of the soil of ISU research farms in central Iowa. The containers pump air samples into a central shed where an analyzer automatically measures nitrous oxide content. This method hadn’t been used before to measure nitrous oxide, and Hall said the researchers had to design the system to withstand the wet conditions often present in agricultural fields.   

Hall’s coauthors include Nathaniel Lawrence, an ISU graduate student in ecology, evolution and organismal biology; Carlos Tenesaca, a research scientist in ecology, evolution and organismal biology; and Andy VanLoocke, an associate professor of agronomy.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Experimental study

Not applicable

Nitrous oxide emissions from agricultural soils challenge climate sustainability in the US Corn Belt

8-Nov-2021

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

Media Contact

Fred Love
Iowa State University
fredlove08@gmail.com
Office: 515-294-0704

Expert Contact

Steven Hall
Iowa State University
stevenjh@iastate.edu
Office: 515-294-7650


Reducing Forest Fuels with Biochar – The Lands Council

9 November, 2021
 

Please visit status.squarespace.com for updates


Biochar Market Size, Analysis 2028 | Key Players

9 November, 2021
 

New Jersey, United States,- A recent market research report added to the repository of Verified Market Research is an in-depth analysis of the Biochar Market. On the basis of historic growth analysis and the current scenario of the Biochar marketplace, the report intends to offer actionable insights on Global market growth projections. Authenticated data presented in the report is based on findings of extensive primary and secondary research. Insights drawn from data serve as excellent tools that facilitate a deeper understanding of multiple aspects of the Biochar market. This further helps users with their developmental strategy.

 

This report examines all the key factors influencing the growth of the Biochar market, including demand-supply scenario, pricing structure, profit margins, production, and value chain analysis. Regional assessment of Biochar market unlocks a plethora of untapped opportunities in regional and domestic market places. Detailed company profiling enables users to evaluate company shares analysis, emerging product lines, the scope in new markets, pricing strategies, innovation possibilities, and much more.

 

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The report covers extensive analysis of the key market players in the market, along with their business overview, expansion plans, and strategies. The key players studied in the report include:

 

Cool Planet, Pacific Biochar Benefit Corporation, Genesis Industries, LLC, CharGrow USA LLC, Black Owl Biochar, Phoenix Energy Group, Airex Énergie Inc., Ambient Energy LLC, Avello Bioenergy, ETIA Group and others.

 

Trusted current state analysis tools, such as Porter’s five forces analysis and SWOT analysis are employed in the report to assess the Biochar market data to deploy a complete overview of the market. Furthermore, this report gives a complete review of the magnitude and application scope of the market around the world. A detailed overview of the purchasing criteria and difficulties confronted in the Biochar business sector is also elaborated in this report.

 

Biochar Market Segmentation

 

Biochar Market, By Feedstock Type

• Woody Biomass
• Agricultural Waste
• Animal Manure
• Others

Biochar Market, By Technology

• Pyrolysis
• Gasification
• Others

Biochar Market, By Application

• Electricity Generation
• Agriculture
• Forestry

 

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Biochar Market Report Scope

 

 

Geographic Segment Covered in the Report:

 

The Biochar report provides information about the market area, which is further subdivided into sub-regions and countries/regions. In addition to the market share in each country and sub-region, this chapter of this report also contains information on profit opportunities. This chapter of the report mentions the market share and growth rate of each region, country and sub-region during the estimated period. 

 

 • North America (USA and Canada)
 • Europe (UK, Germany, France and the rest of Europe)
 • Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, and the rest of the Asia Pacific region)
 • Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, and the rest of Latin America)
 • Middle East and Africa (GCC and rest of the Middle East and Africa)

 

Key questions answered in the report:

 

• What is the growth potential of the Biochar market?
 • Which product segment will take the lion’s share?
 • Which regional market will emerge as a pioneer in the years to come?
 • Which application segment will experience strong growth?
 • What growth opportunities might arise in the Biochar industry in the years to come?
 • What are the most significant challenges that the Biochar market could face in the future?
 • Who are the leading companies on the Biochar market?
 • What are the main trends that are positively impacting the growth of the market?
 • What growth strategies are the players considering to stay in the Biochar market?

 

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Verified Market Intelligence is our BI-enabled platform for narrative storytelling of this market. VMI offers in-depth forecasted trends and accurate Insights on over 20,000+ emerging & niche markets, helping you make critical revenue-impacting decisions for a brilliant future.

 

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Advanced Resilient Biocarbon Secures Credit Enhancement for €500 million Climate Bond …

9 November, 2021
 

There were 814 press releases posted in the last 24 hours and 187,457 in the last 365 days.

Mobilizing capital to address SDGs and the Climate Crisis

Time is of the essence

Biochar an IPCC recognized Carbon Capture tool

Breakthrough blended finance innovation will mobilize structured private capital funding for seven shovel-ready carbon sequestration projects

COLD SPRING, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES, November 9, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Advanced Resilient Biocarbon LLC ("ARB"), a provider of scalable Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage (PyCCS) solutions, announces its first pre-issuance credit enhancement guarantor toward issuing a 500 million Euro Climate Bond.

The Climate Bond Initiative's stringent standards against "green-washing" have been critical to mobilizing the capital required by innovators like ARB. IRISOAK, an international business partnership, has issued a conditional letter of intent and initial proof of funds as a first step toward securing a Pre-Issuance Credit Enhancement Guarantee for ARB's Climate Bond. "We see the commitment of our group to ARB as a vital step to aggressively reverse the effects of climate change," said IRISOAK founding member Jay Sheth. "We must act now to secure global net-zero as soon as possible and keep 1.5 degrees within reach.”

“ARB possesses technology that sequesters carbon and repairs the environmental damage already done by past and present generations,” says Sheth. “ARB's solutions go far beyond sequestering carbon and offering carbon credits; they improve soil health, reduce GHG emissions, and improve water quality."

According to Marshall Mermell, CEO of ARB, "Securing the support of IRISOAK is a huge step for our company and an important example of innovation in blended finance—an approach that mixes public and commercial capital to reduce investment risk. IRISOAK's support will help mobilize the capital required to address climate change and the United Nations Sustainability Development Goals (SDGs). ARB meets fourteen of the seventeen SDGs and is in a unique position to fulfill the global need to both sequester carbon and fulfill SDGs at scale. Our global team of scientists and engineers have developed technologies that provide financially viable solutions which address the challenges of climate change, decarbonization, and circularity."

“With seven shovel-ready joint ventures,” says Mermell, “and with IRISOAK's support, ARB looks forward to becoming a flagship for climate repair, the circular economy, and financial recovery. As the world transitions to low-carbon solutions, ARB offers an innovative business platform designed to lead the way out of the climate crisis and toward climate restoration and repair.”

Advanced Resilient Biocarbon, LLC (ARB) is a US affiliate of Advanced Resilient Technology, Ltd (ART). An international technology development company, ART was founded in 2013 on the Isle of Man. ART offers an executive team comprising engineers, scientists, and business managers from five continents. A new joint venture entity is established in each location where ART systems are installed, to manage operations, meet local governance requirements, and generate financial benefits for all stakeholders. By benefiting people, planet and profits, its projects deliver a true triple-bottom-line to its joint-venture partners while helping them to become carbon-negative as quickly as possible.

IRISOAK is a boutique international company focused on management consultancy, mergers and acquisitions and innovative financial solutions for early stage and growth companies. Founding partners Jay Sheth, Dr. Rubens Talukder and Arno Neumann head engineering and finance companies. In their view, applying a blended finance approach allows companies and projects to get off the ground in emerging markets and attracts private investors for the express purpose of investing their money toward the SDGs to address the climate crisis.

EIN Presswire’s priority is source transparency. We do not allow opaque clients, and our editors try to be careful about weeding out false and misleading content. As a user, if you see something we have missed, please do bring it to our attention. Your help is welcome. EIN Presswire, Everyone’s Internet News Presswire™, tries to define some of the boundaries that are reasonable in today’s world. Please see our Editorial Guidelines for more information.

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Dance Studio Software Market Report by Size, Share, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin

9 November, 2021
 

The competitive landscape analysis of Dance Studio Software Market uncovers detailed company profiles, revenue shares, portfolio innovations, regional product footprint, key developmental strategies, pricing structure, target markets, and near-term plans of market leaders. This entire section helps readers gain an essence of what is driving competition and what would help them stand out to win new target markets.

Market estimates and forecast are backed by an extensive primary research, further complemented by on-point secondary research of Dance Studio Software Market. The research analysts have invested significant time and effort in gathering critical industry information from KIPs such as OEMs, top suppliers and distributors, and government bodies.

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Market segmentation

Dance Studio Software market is split by Type and by Application. For the period 2016-2026, the growth among segments provide accurate calculations and forecasts for revenue by Type and by Application. This analysis can help you expand your business by targeting qualified niche markets.

Market segment by Type, covers

SaaS and Cloud-based

Web-based and On-Premises

Market segment by Application, can be divided into

Independent Instructors

Dance Studios and Schools

Market segment by players, this report covers

Mindbody

WellnessLiving

Jackrabbit Dance

Pike13

DanceStudio-Pro

Dance Studio Manager

Compu Dance

Zen Planner

Glofox

Vagaro.com

SportsEngine

ClassJuggler

Akada Software

Danceboss

IClassPro

The Studio Director

Sawyer

Amilia

Omnify

Acuity Scheduling

Market segment by regions, regional analysis covers

North America (United States, Canada, and Mexico)

Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia, Italy, and Rest of Europe)

Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, South Korea, India, Southeast Asia, Australia, and Rest of Asia-Pacific)

South America (Brazil, Argentina, Rest of South America)

Middle East & Africa (Turkey, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Rest of Middle East & Africa)

The content of the study subjects, includes a total of 12 chapters:

Chapter 1, to describe Dance Studio Software product scope, market overview, market opportunities, market driving force and market risks.

Chapter 2, to profile the top players of Dance Studio Software, with revenue, gross margin and global market share of Dance Studio Software from 2019 to 2021.

Chapter 3, the Dance Studio Software competitive situation, revenue and global market share of top players are analyzed emphatically by landscape contrast.

Chapter 4 and 5, to segment the market size by type and application, with revenue and growth rate by type, application, from 2016 to 2026.

Chapter 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, to break the market size data at the country level, with revenue and market share for key countries in the world, from 2016 to 2021.and Dance Studio Software market forecast, by regions, type and application, with revenue, from 2021 to 2026.

Chapter 11 and 12, to describe Dance Studio Software research findings and conclusion, appendix and data source.

Dance Studio Software Market Regional Analysis Includes:

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Some Point from Table of Content:

Market Overview: It incorporates six sections, research scope, significant makers covered, market fragments by type, Dance Studio Software market portions by application, study goals, and years considered.

Market Landscape: Here, the opposition in the Worldwide Dance Studio Software Market is dissected, by value, income, deals, and piece of the pie by organization, market rate, cutthroat circumstances Landscape, and most recent patterns, consolidation, development, obtaining, and portions of the overall industry of top organizations.

Profiles of Manufacturers: Here, driving players of the worldwide Dance Studio Software market are considered dependent on deals region, key items, net edge, income, cost, and creation.

Market Status and Outlook by Region: In this segment, the report examines about net edge, deals, income, creation, portion of the overall industry, CAGR, and market size by locale. Here, the worldwide Dance Studio Software Market is profoundly examined based on areas and nations like North America, Europe, China, India, Japan, and the MEA.

Application or End User: This segment of the exploration study shows how extraordinary end-client/application sections add to the worldwide Dance Studio Software Market.

Market Forecast: Production Side: In this piece of the report, the creators have zeroed in on creation and creation esteem conjecture, key makers gauge, and creation and creation esteem estimate by type.

Research Findings and Conclusion: This is one of the last segments of the report where the discoveries of the investigators and the finish of the exploration study are given.

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Effects of Biochar Produced From Tropical Rice Straw, Corncob and Bamboo Tree at …

9 November, 2021
 

This study aimed to evaluate the effects of biochar produced from tropical biomass resources (rice straw, corncob and bamboo) at different processing temperatures (300, 500 and 700oC) on in vitro rumen fermentation and methane production. Treatments were arranged as a 3×3 factorial with three biomass resources and three biochar processing temperatures. Added biochar occupied 3% of the substrate (DM basic). 250 mg of the air-dried substrate was incubated in 120 ml bottles, which contained 25 ml of mixed rumen fluid and buffer mineral solution. Total gas and methane production, in vitro digestibility of DM, OM, and in vitro rumen fermentation characteristics were determined at three-time points: 4, 24 and 48 hours of the incubation. Results showed that biomass resources and processing temperatures affected gas production at 4, 24 and 48 hours of the incubation (P < 0.02). Interactions between biomass resources and processing temperatures affected gas production at 4 hours (P = 0.06) and 24 hours (P = 0.001). Biomass resources and processing temperatures affected methane production at different time points of the incubation, except the effect of biomass resources at 24 hours (P = 0.406). Increased processing temperature from 300 to 700oC reduced gas and methane production (P < 0.05). Biomass resources affected OM digestibility after 4 and 24 hours of incubation. Processing temperatures and their interaction with biomass resources affected OM digestibility after 48 hours of incubation (P < 0.001). NH3-N concentrations at 24 and 48h were highest for corncob, then rice straw, and lowest for bamboo tree derived biochar (P < 0.05). Increased processing temperatures resulted in higher NH3-N concentrations at 24 and 48 hours of incubation (P < 0.05). To mitigate methane production, biomass resources and processing temperatures should be considered when utilising biochar as feed additive in ruminant diets.

No competing interests reported.

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On 03 Nov, 2021

On 03 Nov, 2021

Invitations sent on 03 Nov, 2021

On 03 Nov, 2021

On 03 Nov, 2021

On 03 Nov, 2021

On 13 Oct, 2021

On 03 Nov, 2021

On 03 Nov, 2021

Invitations sent on 03 Nov, 2021

On 03 Nov, 2021

On 03 Nov, 2021

On 03 Nov, 2021

On 13 Oct, 2021

This study aimed to evaluate the effects of biochar produced from tropical biomass resources (rice straw, corncob and bamboo) at different processing temperatures (300, 500 and 700oC) on in vitro rumen fermentation and methane production. Treatments were arranged as a 3×3 factorial with three biomass resources and three biochar processing temperatures. Added biochar occupied 3% of the substrate (DM basic). 250 mg of the air-dried substrate was incubated in 120 ml bottles, which contained 25 ml of mixed rumen fluid and buffer mineral solution. Total gas and methane production, in vitro digestibility of DM, OM, and in vitro rumen fermentation characteristics were determined at three-time points: 4, 24 and 48 hours of the incubation. Results showed that biomass resources and processing temperatures affected gas production at 4, 24 and 48 hours of the incubation (P < 0.02). Interactions between biomass resources and processing temperatures affected gas production at 4 hours (P = 0.06) and 24 hours (P = 0.001). Biomass resources and processing temperatures affected methane production at different time points of the incubation, except the effect of biomass resources at 24 hours (P = 0.406). Increased processing temperature from 300 to 700oC reduced gas and methane production (P < 0.05). Biomass resources affected OM digestibility after 4 and 24 hours of incubation. Processing temperatures and their interaction with biomass resources affected OM digestibility after 48 hours of incubation (P < 0.001). NH3-N concentrations at 24 and 48h were highest for corncob, then rice straw, and lowest for bamboo tree derived biochar (P < 0.05). Increased processing temperatures resulted in higher NH3-N concentrations at 24 and 48 hours of incubation (P < 0.05). To mitigate methane production, biomass resources and processing temperatures should be considered when utilising biochar as feed additive in ruminant diets.

No competing interests reported.

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Wood Vinegar Market to Witness Robust Expansion by 2028 | TAGROW CO. LTD., Ace … – LSMedia

9 November, 2021
 

Wood Vinegar Market research is an intelligence report with meticulous efforts undertaken to study the right and valuable information. The data which has been looked upon is done considering both, the existing top players and the upcoming competitors. Business strategies of the key players and the new entering market industries are studied in detail. Well explained SWOT analysis, revenue share and contact information are shared in this report analysis. It also provides market information in terms of development and its capacities.

“Wood Vinegar Market is growing at a High CAGR during the forecast period 2021-2028. The increasing interest of the individuals in this industry is that the major reason for the expansion of this market”.

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Some of the Top companies Influencing in this Market includes:

TAGROW CO. LTD., Ace (Singapore) Pte Ltd., Byron Biochar, Nettenergy BV, Canada Renewable Bioenergy Corporation, and Nakashima Trading Co. Ltd..

Various factors are responsible for the market’s growth trajectory, which are studied at length in the report. In addition, the report lists down the restraints that are posing threat to the global Wood Vinegar market. This report is a consolidation of primary and secondary research, which provides market size, share, dynamics, and forecast for various segments and sub-segments considering the macro and micro environmental factors. It also gauges the bargaining power of suppliers and buyers, threat from new entrants and product substitute, and the degree of competition prevailing in the market.

Global Wood Vinegar Market research report offers:

Get Up to 30% Discount on the first purchase of this report @: https://www.a2zmarketresearch.com/discount/547504

Regions Covered in the Global Wood Vinegar Market Report 2020:
• The Middle East and Africa (GCC Countries and Egypt)
• North America (the United States, Mexico, and Canada)
• South America (Brazil etc.)
• Europe (Turkey, Germany, Russia UK, Italy, France, etc.)
• Asia-Pacific (Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Japan, Philippines, Korea, Thailand, India, Indonesia, and Australia)

The cost analysis of the Global Wood Vinegar Market has been performed while keeping in view manufacturing expenses, labor cost, and raw materials and their market concentration rate, suppliers, and price trend. Other factors such as Supply chain, downstream buyers, and sourcing strategy have been assessed to provide a complete and in-depth view of the market. Buyers of the report will also be exposed to a study on market positioning with factors such as target client, brand strategy, and price strategy taken into consideration.

Key questions answered in the report include:

Table of Contents

Global Wood Vinegar Market Research Report 2021 – 2028

Chapter 1 Wood Vinegar Market Overview

Chapter 2 Global Economic Impact on Industry

Chapter 3 Global Market Competition by Manufacturers

Chapter 4 Global Production, Revenue (Value) by Region

Chapter 5 Global Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Regions

Chapter 6 Global Production, Revenue (Value), Price Trend by Type

Chapter 7 Global Market Analysis by Application

Chapter 8 Manufacturing Cost Analysis

Chapter 9 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers

Chapter 10 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders

Chapter 11 Market Effect Factors Analysis

Chapter 12 Global Wood Vinegar Market Forecast

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Our Research Analyst Provides business insights and market research reports for large and small businesses.

The company helps clients build business policies and grow in that market area. A2Z Market Research is not only interested in industry reports dealing with telecommunications, healthcare, pharmaceuticals, financial services, energy, technology, real estate, logistics, F & B, media, etc. but also your company data, country profiles, trends, information and analysis on the sector of your interest.

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This Innovative Company Helps Tackle Wildfires and Drought in California – Treehugger

9 November, 2021
 

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A Record Year For Strength and Conditioning Education! – News Anyway

9 November, 2021
 

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Charcoal business expands with support funding | Midlands Deals News | Insider Media

9 November, 2021
 

For further information regarding Insider events, please use the contact details below:

T: 0161 907 9758
E: eventenquiry@newsco.com

In this edition, can Wolverhampton £4.4bn…

A Shropshire charcoal business is expanding into a new market after receiving grant support from the Marches Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP).

Caradoc Charcoal, which was formed in 2019 by directors Charlotte Smith and Kevin Fryer, is now selling a by-product of the charcoal manufacturing process called biochar as a soil improver and animal feed after securing £10,000 from the Small Equipment Grant Scheme.

The funding was used to support the purchase of a special sifting machine to grade the biochar into usable sizes. It also helped the business to buy a bagging and weighing machine to upgrade its existing system.

Alongside the Small Equipment Grant, the company was also supported by the Energy and Bioproducts Research Institute (EBRI), which ran tests on its biochar products to ensure they met the required standards for use.

Additionally, The Centre for Research into Environmental Science and Technology at University Centre Shrewsbury carried out research into the biochar, including the cost of processing, use of additives as a binding agent and market interest in the product.

Smith said: “The help we have received through the grant scheme and the other programmes has made a huge difference to our development. We produce a high-quality 100 per cent natural product, with a minimal carbon footprint, which has big environmental advantages over much of the imported charcoal used in this country.

“This help means that even our bi-product can be put to an environmentally-productive use, improving the soil and even neutralising methane in animals' stomachs when it is introduced to their feed.”

Rachel Laver, Marches LEP chief executive, added: “The hub has access to a huge range of support, advice and funding and can help businesses of all sizes and sectors meet their ambitions to grow.

“The support that Cardoc Charcoal has received through a variety of programmes is a small indication of what we can offer.”

Adam Beech, Digital Staff Writer
T: 0161 907 9752
E: adam.beech@newsco.com

Tracey Bull, Regional Sales Director
T: 0121 214 6560
E: tracey.bull@newsco.com

T: 0161 907 9711


Sodium Naphthalene Market Size and Analysis | Leading Keyplayers – LSMedia

9 November, 2021
 

New Jersey, United States,- The research study presented in this report offers complete and intelligent analysis of the competition, segmentation, dynamics, and geographical advancement of the Sodium Naphthalene Market. It takes into account the CAGR, value, volume, revenue, production, consumption, sales, manufacturing cost, prices, and other key factors related to the Sodium Naphthalene market. The authors of the report have segmented the Sodium Naphthalene market as per product, application, and region. Segments of the Sodium Naphthalene market are analyzed on the basis of market share, production, consumption, revenue, CAGR, market size, and more factors. The analysts have profiled leading players of the Sodium Naphthalene market, keeping in view their recent developments, market share, sales, revenue, areas covered, product portfolios, and other aspects.

The comparative results provided in the Sodium Naphthalene report allow readers to understand the difference between players and how they are competing against each other. The research study gives a detailed view of current and future trends and opportunities of the Sodium Naphthalene market. Market dynamics such as drivers and restraints are explained in the most detailed and easiest manner possible with the use of tables and graphs. Interested parties are expected to find important recommendations to improve their business in the Sodium Naphthalene market.

Get | Download Sample Copy with TOC, Graphs & List of Figures @ https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/download-sample/?rid=109213

The report covers extensive analysis of the key market players in the market, along with their business overview, expansion plans, and strategies. The key players studied in the report include:

• Kao Chemicals
• Kawaken Fine Chemicals

The segmental analysis includes deep evaluation of each and every segment of the Sodium Naphthalene market studied in the report. All of the segments of the Sodium Naphthalene market are analyzed on the basis of market share, revenue, market size, production, and future prospects. The regional study of the Sodium Naphthalene market explains how different regions and country-level markets are making developments. Furthermore, it gives a statistical representation of their progress during the course of the forecast period. Our analysts have used advanced primary and secondary research methodologies to compile the research study on the Sodium Naphthalene market.

Sodium Naphthalene Market Segmentation

By the product type, the market is primarily split into:

• Type I
• Type II

By the application, this report covers the following segments:

• Dispersants for Versatile Uses
• Base for Spreader of Agricultural Chemicals
• Dispersants for Synthetic Rubbers and Resins in Emulsion Polymerization
• Dyeing Auxiliaries
• Dispersing and Wetting Agents of Paper Processing Aids
• Other

Get Discount On The Purchase Of This Report @ https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/ask-for-discount/?rid=109213

Sodium Naphthalene Market Report Scope

Geographic Segment Covered in the Report:

The Sodium Naphthalene report provides information about the market area, which is further subdivided into sub-regions and countries/regions. In addition to the market share in each country and sub-region, this chapter of this report also contains information on profit opportunities. This chapter of the report mentions the market share and growth rate of each region, country and sub-region during the estimated period. 

 • North America (USA and Canada)
 • Europe (UK, Germany, France and the rest of Europe)
 • Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, and the rest of the Asia Pacific region)
 • Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, and the rest of Latin America)
 • Middle East and Africa (GCC and rest of the Middle East and Africa)

Key questions answered in the report:

 • What is the growth potential of the Sodium Naphthalene market?
 • Which product segment will take the lion’s share?
 • Which regional market will emerge as a pioneer in the years to come?
 • Which application segment will experience strong growth?
 • What growth opportunities might arise in the Sodium Naphthalene industry in the years to come?
 • What are the most significant challenges that the Sodium Naphthalene market could face in the future?
 • Who are the leading companies on the Sodium Naphthalene market?
 • What are the main trends that are positively impacting the growth of the market?
 • What growth strategies are the players considering to stay in the Sodium Naphthalene market?

For More Information or Query or Customization Before Buying, Visit @ https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/product/global-sodium-naphthalene-market-2019-by-manufacturers-regions-type-and-application-forecast-to-2024/

Visualize Sodium Naphthalene Market using Verified Market Intelligence:-

Verified Market Intelligence is our BI-enabled platform for narrative storytelling of this market. VMI offers in-depth forecasted trends and accurate Insights on over 20,000+ emerging & niche markets, helping you make critical revenue-impacting decisions for a brilliant future.

VMI provides a holistic overview and global competitive landscape with respect to Region, Country, and Segment, and Key players of your market. Present your Market Report & findings with an inbuilt presentation feature saving over 70% of your time and resources for Investor, Sales & Marketing, R&D, and Product Development pitches. VMI enables data delivery In Excel and Interactive PDF formats with over 15+ Key Market Indicators for your market.

Visualize Sodium Naphthalene Market using VMI @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/vmintelligence/

About Us: Verified Market Reports

Verified Market Reports is a leading Global Research and Consulting firm servicing over 5000+ global clients. We provide advanced analytical research solutions while offering information-enriched research studies.

We also offer insights into strategic and growth analyses and data necessary to achieve corporate goals and critical revenue decisions.

Our 250 Analysts and SME’s offer a high level of expertise in data collection and governance using industrial techniques to collect and analyze data on more than 25,000 high-impact and niche markets. Our analysts are trained to combine modern data collection techniques, superior research methodology, expertise, and years of collective experience to produce informative and accurate research.

Our research spans over a multitude of industries including Energy, Technology, Manufacturing and Construction, Chemicals and Materials, Food and Beverages etc. Having serviced many Fortune 2000 organizations, we bring a rich and reliable experience that covers all kinds of research needs.

Contact us:

Mr. Edwyne Fernandes

US: +1 (650)-781-4080
UK: +44 (753)-715-0008
APAC: +61 (488)-85-9400
US Toll-Free: +1 (800)-782-1768

Email: [email protected] 

Website: – https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Newsup by Themeansar.


Limited effects of century-old biochar on taxonomic and functional diversities of collembolan …

9 November, 2021
 

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Biochar Reduces the Adverse Effect of Saline Water on Soil Properties and Wheat … – MDPI

9 November, 2021
 

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Feature Papers represent the most advanced research with significant potential for high impact in the field. Feature Papers are submitted upon individual invitation or recommendation by the scientific editors and undergo peer review prior to publication.

The Feature Paper can be either an original research article, a substantial novel research study that often involves several techniques or approaches, or a comprehensive review paper with concise and precise updates on the latest progress in the field that systematically reviews the most exciting advances in scientific literature. This type of paper provides an outlook on future directions of research or possible applications.

Editor’s Choice articles are based on recommendations by the scientific editors of MDPI journals from around the world. Editors select a small number of articles recently published in the journal that they believe will be particularly interesting to authors, or important in this field. The aim is to provide a snapshot of some of the most exciting work published in the various research areas of the journal.

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El-sayed, M.E.A.; Hazman, M.; Abd El-Rady, A.G.; Almas, L.; McFarland, M.; Shams El Din, A.; Burian, S. Biochar Reduces the Adverse Effect of Saline Water on Soil Properties and Wheat Production Profitability. Agriculture 2021, 11, 1112. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11111112

El-sayed MEA, Hazman M, Abd El-Rady AG, Almas L, McFarland M, Shams El Din A, Burian S. Biochar Reduces the Adverse Effect of Saline Water on Soil Properties and Wheat Production Profitability. Agriculture. 2021; 11(11):1112. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11111112

El-sayed, Mohamed E.A., Mohamed Hazman, Ayman G. Abd El-Rady, Lal Almas, Mike McFarland, Ali Shams El Din, and Steve Burian. 2021. “Biochar Reduces the Adverse Effect of Saline Water on Soil Properties and Wheat Production Profitability” Agriculture 11, no. 11: 1112. https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture11111112

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Application of biochar-based phosphorus fertilizer to enhance soil fertility and productivity – Frontiers

9 November, 2021
 

Phosphorus (P) is the second essential macro-nutrient after nitrogen for plant growth. Mineral P fertilizers have been widely distributed to maintain soil nutrients and crop production in the world. But its availability is restricted since P is non-renewable. There is increasing concern across the world that natural P reserves may be depleted in 50-100 years. Nevertheless, the use of P fertilizer is high due to higher crop demand in low-fertility soil. But, the total P use efficiency of crop plants is relatively poor. The remaining P after plant uptake is either fixed in the soil or becomes a contaminant in the aquatic environment, causing the unavailability of P to plants and eutrophication, respectively. Thus, a suitable P fertilization strategy must be consistent with crop growth in low-fertility soils to achieve sustainable P fertilizer utilization. In this context, biochar-based P fertilizers could greatly optimize P use efficiency by crop plants.

Biochar, a carbon-rich material produced from biomass pyrolysis, has become a familiar cosmopolitan soil amendment over the last decades. With very few exceptions, the application of biochar can improve the quality of soils. In general, the P content of biochar is modest; however, it can be raised by the modification of biochar or P loaded-biochar instead of direct application of P.

This research topic aims to achieve a better insight on the impact of the addition of biochar-based P fertilizer on the P dynamics and availability in different agroecosystems.

We are inviting you to submit original research articles, short communications, and review articles which provide clear and specific theoretical, conceptual or methodological approaches to the existing literature on P dynamics.

The topic encourages the following areas but is not limited to:

• Soil health enhancement using biochar-based P fertilizer

• P cycling in biochar-based agroecosystem

• P use efficiency in biochar-based P fertilizer agroecosystem

• Modified biochar impact on P bioavailability

• Biochar-based green technologies or approaches for sustainable P management

• Biochar-based P fertilizer application impacts on the environment

• Soil, plant and environment interaction in biochar-based P fertilizer farming system

Keywords: Low-fertility soil, engineered-biochar, phosphorus dynamics, phosphorus use efficiency, sustainable phosphorus management

Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Phosphorus (P) is the second essential macro-nutrient after nitrogen for plant growth. Mineral P fertilizers have been widely distributed to maintain soil nutrients and crop production in the world. But its availability is restricted since P is non-renewable. There is increasing concern across the world that natural P reserves may be depleted in 50-100 years. Nevertheless, the use of P fertilizer is high due to higher crop demand in low-fertility soil. But, the total P use efficiency of crop plants is relatively poor. The remaining P after plant uptake is either fixed in the soil or becomes a contaminant in the aquatic environment, causing the unavailability of P to plants and eutrophication, respectively. Thus, a suitable P fertilization strategy must be consistent with crop growth in low-fertility soils to achieve sustainable P fertilizer utilization. In this context, biochar-based P fertilizers could greatly optimize P use efficiency by crop plants.

Biochar, a carbon-rich material produced from biomass pyrolysis, has become a familiar cosmopolitan soil amendment over the last decades. With very few exceptions, the application of biochar can improve the quality of soils. In general, the P content of biochar is modest; however, it can be raised by the modification of biochar or P loaded-biochar instead of direct application of P.

This research topic aims to achieve a better insight on the impact of the addition of biochar-based P fertilizer on the P dynamics and availability in different agroecosystems.

We are inviting you to submit original research articles, short communications, and review articles which provide clear and specific theoretical, conceptual or methodological approaches to the existing literature on P dynamics.

The topic encourages the following areas but is not limited to:

• Soil health enhancement using biochar-based P fertilizer

• P cycling in biochar-based agroecosystem

• P use efficiency in biochar-based P fertilizer agroecosystem

• Modified biochar impact on P bioavailability

• Biochar-based green technologies or approaches for sustainable P management

• Biochar-based P fertilizer application impacts on the environment

• Soil, plant and environment interaction in biochar-based P fertilizer farming system

Keywords: Low-fertility soil, engineered-biochar, phosphorus dynamics, phosphorus use efficiency, sustainable phosphorus management

Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.


Biochar-Egypt | 104 El Nozha Street Heliopolis 11736 Cairo, Cairo Governorate, Egypt

9 November, 2021
 

Locality: Cairo, Egypt

Phone: +20 1001017727

Address: 104 El Nozha Street Heliopolis 11736 Cairo, Cairo Governorate, Egypt

Followers: 617

Be green

2257 19 Work Office Permits Street, Al Maraj City – Maadi 11728 Cairo, Cairo Governorate, Egypt

+20 1113551385

Agricultural service

BLOOM

4 El-Narges St. Off El-Nabatat St. El-Mehwar El-Markazy, 6th October City, Giza Egypt. 12566 Giza, Giza Governorate, Egypt

+20 3 8365934

Agricultural service

Bio chemical Egypt

22825 Kom Hamada, Beheira Governorate, Egypt

+20 1009958821

Agricultural service, Chemical company

Fitness trainer, Jewellery/watches, Visual arts, Personal coach, Tools/equipment, Advertising agency, Motivational speaker, Religious school, Actor, Fictional character, Nursery & garden centre, Counsellor

Pirate, PS4 Games, The Muckingbyrd, N.D.S, Mobile shop, Alhadba Store, Al-Hayat


2. (a) Explain thermal NOx, prompt NOx and fuel NOx. | Chegg.com

9 November, 2021
 

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Asia Pacific Biochar Market Size, Analysis 2028 | Key Players

9 November, 2021
 

New Jersey, United States,- A recent market research report added to the repository of Verified Market Research is an in-depth analysis of the Asia Pacific Biochar Market. On the basis of historic growth analysis and the current scenario of the Asia Pacific Biochar marketplace, the report intends to offer actionable insights on Global market growth projections. Authenticated data presented in the report is based on findings of extensive primary and secondary research. Insights drawn from data serve as excellent tools that facilitate a deeper understanding of multiple aspects of the Asia Pacific Biochar market. This further helps users with their developmental strategy.

 

This report examines all the key factors influencing the growth of the Asia Pacific Biochar market, including demand-supply scenario, pricing structure, profit margins, production, and value chain analysis. Regional assessment of Asia Pacific Biochar market unlocks a plethora of untapped opportunities in regional and domestic market places. Detailed company profiling enables users to evaluate company shares analysis, emerging product lines, the scope in new markets, pricing strategies, innovation possibilities, and much more.

 

Get | Download Sample Copy with TOC, Graphs & List of Figures @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/download-sample/?rid=63544

 

The report covers extensive analysis of the key market players in the market, along with their business overview, expansion plans, and strategies. The key players studied in the report include:

 

biochar Products Inc., Diacarbon Energy Inc., Agri-Tech Producers LLC, Genesis Industries, Green Charcoal International, Vega Biofuels Inc., The Biochar Company, Cool Planet Energy Systems Inc., Full Circle biochar, Pacific Pyrolysis Pty Ltd and others.

 

Trusted current state analysis tools, such as Porter’s five forces analysis and SWOT analysis are employed in the report to assess the Asia Pacific Biochar market data to deploy a complete overview of the market. Furthermore, this report gives a complete review of the magnitude and application scope of the market around the world. A detailed overview of the purchasing criteria and difficulties confronted in the Asia Pacific Biochar business sector is also elaborated in this report.

 

Asia Pacific Biochar Market Segmentation

 

Asia Pacific Biochar Market, By Feedstock Type

• Woody Biomass
• Agricultural Waste
• Animal Manure
• Others

Asia Pacific Biochar Market, By Technology

• Pyrolysis
• Gasification
• Others

Asia Pacific Biochar Market, By Application

• Electricity Generation
• Agriculture
• Forestry

 

Get Discount On The Purchase Of This Report @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/ask-for-discount/?rid=63544

 

Asia Pacific Biochar Market Report Scope

 

 

Geographic Segment Covered in the Report:

 

The Asia Pacific Biochar report provides information about the market area, which is further subdivided into sub-regions and countries/regions. In addition to the market share in each country and sub-region, this chapter of this report also contains information on profit opportunities. This chapter of the report mentions the market share and growth rate of each region, country and sub-region during the estimated period. 

 

 • North America (USA and Canada)
 • Europe (UK, Germany, France and the rest of Europe)
 • Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, and the rest of the Asia Pacific region)
 • Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, and the rest of Latin America)
 • Middle East and Africa (GCC and rest of the Middle East and Africa)

 

Key questions answered in the report:

 

• What is the growth potential of the Asia Pacific Biochar market?
 • Which product segment will take the lion’s share?
 • Which regional market will emerge as a pioneer in the years to come?
 • Which application segment will experience strong growth?
 • What growth opportunities might arise in the Asia Pacific Biochar industry in the years to come?
 • What are the most significant challenges that the Asia Pacific Biochar market could face in the future?
 • Who are the leading companies on the Asia Pacific Biochar market?
 • What are the main trends that are positively impacting the growth of the market?
 • What growth strategies are the players considering to stay in the Asia Pacific Biochar market?

 

For More Information or Query or Customization Before Buying, Visit @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/product/asia-pacific-biochar-market/

 

 

Visualize Asia Pacific Biochar Market using Verified Market Intelligence:-

 

Verified Market Intelligence is our BI-enabled platform for narrative storytelling of this market. VMI offers in-depth forecasted trends and accurate Insights on over 20,000+ emerging & niche markets, helping you make critical revenue-impacting decisions for a brilliant future.

 

VMI provides a holistic overview and global competitive landscape with respect to Region, Country, and Segment, and Key players of your market. Present your Market Report & findings with an inbuilt presentation feature saving over 70% of your time and resources for Investor, Sales & Marketing, R&D, and Product Development pitches. VMI enables data delivery In Excel and Interactive PDF formats with over 15+ Key Market Indicators for your market.

 

Visualize Asia Pacific Biochar Market using VMI @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/vmintelligence/

 

About Us: Verified Market Research®

 

Verified Market Research® is a leading Global Research and Consulting firm that has been providing advanced analytical research solutions, custom consulting and in-depth data analysis for 10+ years to individuals and companies alike that are looking for accurate, reliable and up to date research data and technical consulting. We offer insights into strategic and growth analyses, Data necessary to achieve corporate goals and help make critical revenue decisions.

 

Our research studies help our clients make superior data-driven decisions, understand market forecast, capitalize on future opportunities and optimize efficiency by working as their partner to deliver accurate and valuable information. The industries we cover span over a large spectrum including Technology, Chemicals, Manufacturing, Energy, Food and Beverages, Automotive, Robotics, Packaging, Construction, Mining & Gas. Etc.

 

We, at Verified Market Research, assist in understanding holistic market indicating factors and most current and future market trends. Our analysts, with their high expertise in data gathering and governance, utilize industry techniques to collate and examine data at all stages. They are trained to combine modern data collection techniques, superior research methodology, subject expertise and years of collective experience to produce informative and accurate research.

 

Having serviced over 5000+ clients, we have provided reliable market research services to more than 100 Global Fortune 500 companies such as Amazon, Dell, IBM, Shell, Exxon Mobil, General Electric, Siemens, Microsoft, Sony and Hitachi. We have co-consulted with some of the world’s leading consulting firms like McKinsey & Company, Boston Consulting Group, Bain and Company for custom research and consulting projects for businesses worldwide.

 

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Verified Market Research®

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APAC: +61 (488)-85-9400
US Toll-Free: +1 (800)-782-1768

Email: [email protected]

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Fine Biochar Powder Market Size and Analysis | Leading Keyplayers – LSMedia

10 November, 2021
 

New Jersey, United States,- The research study presented in this report offers complete and intelligent analysis of the competition, segmentation, dynamics, and geographical advancement of the Fine Biochar Powder Market. It takes into account the CAGR, value, volume, revenue, production, consumption, sales, manufacturing cost, prices, and other key factors related to the Fine Biochar Powder market. The authors of the report have segmented the Fine Biochar Powder market as per product, application, and region. Segments of the Fine Biochar Powder market are analyzed on the basis of market share, production, consumption, revenue, CAGR, market size, and more factors. The analysts have profiled leading players of the Fine Biochar Powder market, keeping in view their recent developments, market share, sales, revenue, areas covered, product portfolios, and other aspects.

The comparative results provided in the Fine Biochar Powder report allow readers to understand the difference between players and how they are competing against each other. The research study gives a detailed view of current and future trends and opportunities of the Fine Biochar Powder market. Market dynamics such as drivers and restraints are explained in the most detailed and easiest manner possible with the use of tables and graphs. Interested parties are expected to find important recommendations to improve their business in the Fine Biochar Powder market.

Get | Download Sample Copy with TOC, Graphs & List of Figures @ https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/download-sample/?rid=546822

The report covers extensive analysis of the key market players in the market, along with their business overview, expansion plans, and strategies. The key players studied in the report include:

• Cool Planet
• Biochar Supreme
• NextChar
• Terra Char
• Genesis Industries
• Interra Energy
• CharGrow
• Pacific Biochar
• Biochar Now
• The Biochar Company (TBC)
• ElementC6
• Vega Bi

The segmental analysis includes deep evaluation of each and every segment of the Fine Biochar Powder market studied in the report. All of the segments of the Fine Biochar Powder market are analyzed on the basis of market share, revenue, market size, production, and future prospects. The regional study of the Fine Biochar Powder market explains how different regions and country-level markets are making developments. Furthermore, it gives a statistical representation of their progress during the course of the forecast period. Our analysts have used advanced primary and secondary research methodologies to compile the research study on the Fine Biochar Powder market.

Fine Biochar Powder Market Segmentation

By the product type, the market is primarily split into:

• Wood Source Biochar
• Corn Source Biochar
• Wheat Source Biochar

By the application, this report covers the following segments:

• Soil Conditioner
• Fertilizer
• Others

Get Discount On The Purchase Of This Report @ https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/ask-for-discount/?rid=546822

Fine Biochar Powder Market Report Scope

Geographic Segment Covered in the Report:

The Fine Biochar Powder report provides information about the market area, which is further subdivided into sub-regions and countries/regions. In addition to the market share in each country and sub-region, this chapter of this report also contains information on profit opportunities. This chapter of the report mentions the market share and growth rate of each region, country and sub-region during the estimated period. 

 • North America (USA and Canada)
 • Europe (UK, Germany, France and the rest of Europe)
 • Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, and the rest of the Asia Pacific region)
 • Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, and the rest of Latin America)
 • Middle East and Africa (GCC and rest of the Middle East and Africa)

Key questions answered in the report:

 • What is the growth potential of the Fine Biochar Powder market?
 • Which product segment will take the lion’s share?
 • Which regional market will emerge as a pioneer in the years to come?
 • Which application segment will experience strong growth?
 • What growth opportunities might arise in the Fine Biochar Powder industry in the years to come?
 • What are the most significant challenges that the Fine Biochar Powder market could face in the future?
 • Who are the leading companies on the Fine Biochar Powder market?
 • What are the main trends that are positively impacting the growth of the market?
 • What growth strategies are the players considering to stay in the Fine Biochar Powder market?

For More Information or Query or Customization Before Buying, Visit @ https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/product/fine-biochar-powder-market-size-and-forecast/

Visualize Fine Biochar Powder Market using Verified Market Intelligence:-

Verified Market Intelligence is our BI-enabled platform for narrative storytelling of this market. VMI offers in-depth forecasted trends and accurate Insights on over 20,000+ emerging & niche markets, helping you make critical revenue-impacting decisions for a brilliant future.

VMI provides a holistic overview and global competitive landscape with respect to Region, Country, and Segment, and Key players of your market. Present your Market Report & findings with an inbuilt presentation feature saving over 70% of your time and resources for Investor, Sales & Marketing, R&D, and Product Development pitches. VMI enables data delivery In Excel and Interactive PDF formats with over 15+ Key Market Indicators for your market.

Visualize Fine Biochar Powder Market using VMI @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/vmintelligence/

About Us: Verified Market Reports

Verified Market Reports is a leading Global Research and Consulting firm servicing over 5000+ global clients. We provide advanced analytical research solutions while offering information-enriched research studies.

We also offer insights into strategic and growth analyses and data necessary to achieve corporate goals and critical revenue decisions.

Our 250 Analysts and SME’s offer a high level of expertise in data collection and governance using industrial techniques to collect and analyze data on more than 25,000 high-impact and niche markets. Our analysts are trained to combine modern data collection techniques, superior research methodology, expertise, and years of collective experience to produce informative and accurate research.

Our research spans over a multitude of industries including Energy, Technology, Manufacturing and Construction, Chemicals and Materials, Food and Beverages etc. Having serviced many Fortune 2000 organizations, we bring a rich and reliable experience that covers all kinds of research needs.

Contact us:

Mr. Edwyne Fernandes

US: +1 (650)-781-4080
UK: +44 (753)-715-0008
APAC: +61 (488)-85-9400
US Toll-Free: +1 (800)-782-1768

Email: [email protected] 

Website: – https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Newsup by Themeansar.


Agricultural soils contribute to climate crisis by releasing nitrous oxide – Earth.com

10 November, 2021
 

A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has found that poorly drained agricultural soils produce nitrous oxide emissions in quantities large enough to contribute to climate change. According to the scientists, such negative effects far exceed the potential benefits of using these soils as carbon sinks.

Researchers, policymakers, and farmers have long explored the potential of agricultural soils to sequester carbon, and thus mitigate climate change. However, a research team led by Iowa State University has argued that such strategies should take into account the fact that such soils emit nitrous oxide, a gas that has 298 times the warming potential of carbon dioxide over 100 years.

As they cycle nitrogen, microorganisms in the soil emit nitrous oxide as a byproduct. Furthermore, since nitrogen stimulates nitrous oxide production, adding nitrogen fertilizers to the soil results in even more emissions. 

In order to gather data for the study, the researchers used small containers placed on various locations on top of corn and soybean fields in central Iowa that measured nitrous oxide emissions every four hours.

“In this study, we show that the climate warming effects of nitrous oxide emissions from local corn and soybean soils are two-fold greater than the climate cooling that might be achieved by increasing soil carbon storage with common agricultural practices,” said study senior author Steven Hall, an associate professor of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology at Iowa State University.

According to Professor Hall and his team, these findings suggest that management plans should also encourage nitrous oxide mitigation strategies together with carbon sequestration. Such strategies include more efficient uses of nitrogen fertilizers, the employment of new products such as enhanced efficiency fertilizers, or the application of biochar to agricultural fields.

“If we want to maximize our climate benefit, we want to be strategic about it. We’re not simply going to flip the switch on climate just by putting more carbon in the soil. Nitrous oxide emissions need to be a priority as well,” concluded Hall.

By Andrei Ionescu, Earth.com Staff Writer


Key To Life takes on the X-Prize challenge | Colorado | gjsentinel.com

10 November, 2021
 

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Join Key to Life’s journey with Carbon Capture technology

www.ktlsupply.com (PRNewsfoto/Key To Life)

Join Key to Life’s journey with Carbon Capture technology

www.ktlsupply.com (PRNewsfoto/Key To Life)

BROOMFIELD, Colo., Nov. 10, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — The X-Prize offered up by Elon Musk is $100M of prizes offered to any company, individual, organization or group of people who can come up with an efficient and scalable solution to carbon sequestration. It is a global competition by which Elon himself has said should help spark advancements in multiple industries to help make more businesses conscious of their carbon footprint and the impact they have on our environment. Tate Dooley of Key To Life has not only accepted the challenge, but believes he and his team have come up with a multi-pronged approach that could solve this problem and help restore the soils that we have destroyed with generations of monoculture farming and traditional agriculture.

The first and most important cog in the wheel is the efficient creation of a product called biochar. Biochar is a pyrolyzed product made from high tensile strength plant material. Things like hemp fiber, invasive species of trees, building material waste and other “dense” plant material are the starter for this process. In Colorado, the invasive beetle-kill pine species of trees that has swept the Rocky Mountains would make a perfect starter material for large scale biochar production. That material is then pyrolyzed by firing it in a kiln that is under vacuum. This process creates a material that has as much biological surface area in a teaspoon of it as an entire football field. Because it is created under a vacuum, there is no waste associated with it either. The gasses produced can easily be captured and utilized for other purposes. This pyrolyzed material is basically pure, structured carbon. This is not ash, which has no structure, it is biochar.

Biochar can help harbor things like beneficial microorganisms and microbes in the soil which are the building blocks of a healthy living system. It can also hold onto nutrients, organic acids, biological stimulants, and most importantly, water! This means that these products can be stored in the soil until plants need them. Supporting a healthy living soil system is the only way to help restore the damage that we have done to “farmable” land over the past 90+ years. If you examine a healthy soil, it contains these microorganisms and microbes as well as many times the amount of CO2 as dead or nonliving soils, which contain almost no CO2. The implementation of biochar helps directly sequester Carbon in the form of CO2 because the living soil holds onto it. A healthy living soil contains around 10% biochar per cubic meter.

This biochar can be used for multiple other applications as well. Any form of filtration can utilize biochar. Air filtration for car mufflers and roadside filters can use biochar. Water treatment and filtration facilities can use it to minimize the introduction of harmful substances into city and rural water supplies. Biochar can even be used to help filter microplastics out of the oceans! As already stated in this article, the first step is creating a supply of biochar efficiently, using a clean fuel source and the highest grade materials and designs. We could possibly use Elon’s rocket technology to help fire the kiln and utilize recycled methane from the pyrolysis process as a fuel source when mixed with pure oxygen. Key To Life will be a leader in this space. Will you join the cause?

Media Contact:

Kyle Broge

kyle@ktlsupply.com  

SOURCE Key To Life

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Monash carbon capture student team wins US$250000 XPRIZE – Minister for Industry

10 November, 2021
 

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Project Manager (Biochar) Jobs in Edinburgh at The Future Forest Company – New Energy Job

10 November, 2021
 

We are on a mission to remove as much excess CO2 from the atmosphere as we can, in order to avoid the most disastrous effects of global warming and the climate crisis. We’re achieving this by planting forests that are profitable, meaning we can scale up our land holding, plant millions of trees, and grow a climate solution which removes significant amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere. Our tools to do this have expanded from reforestation alone to co-deploying reforestation with biochar and enhanced weathering, two relatively new carbon removal technologies being trialled, potentially increasing the amount of carbon sequestered per hectare by an order of magnitude. We have a plan to reach 50k hectares of land holding, and plant 50 million trees.

About the role

As the Project Manager for Biochar you will be responsible for management of the supply of biochar equipment at various locations around the world. You will track unit production timelines, organise delivery logistics and ensure that infrastructure at site is prepared for immediate production. Biochar units are manufactured across the world and feedstocks are equally global. The international nature of Biochar creates a complexity that will require a detail-focused approach and a keen ability to manage time effectively.

What will you do

Pioneering this carbon removal technology at significant scale you will need to be able to work at pace and be comfortable with delivering with a large degree of uncertainty. You will manage a significant number of relationships across the team and with suppliers and partners, ensuring that delivery of units at the right location and the right time is a success.

About you

We are looking for a highly organised and motivated individual – A self starter who can identify problems and then form a solution with little direction. You will be measured and calm under tight time pressures. The Project Manager must be an effective communicator, you need to be able to talk confidently, concisely and with specificity. We aren’t looking for someone who can simply design an attractive Gantt chart, but someone who can organise and tangibly deliver. You will need to be comfortable with finance and managing large budgets. You will have the following responsibilities:

Lead the planning and implementation of Biochar projects – the delivery of Biochar Production Units to feedstock locations

Planning and scheduling project timelines in collaboration with suppliers and partners

Coordinating internal colleagues to ensure the team is delivering the project needs

Planning and allocating resources – logistics, infrastructure and feedstock processing equipment

Carry out project risk assessments. Identify key risks early and take action

Managing project administration, including all documentation

Manage project budget

Reporting and presenting regularly to senior management

Managing supplier and partner relationships

Tracking project performance

Conduct continuous refinement of projects through reviews and lessons learned

Essential

The ideal candidate will have the following

A Degree level qualification or similar

Experience managing projects

An ability to evidence excellent verbal and written communication skills

Excellent IT skills – specifically G-Suite and a Project management system

Desirable

Any Project Management qualification

Experience managing projects internationally

Previous experience managing engineering projects

An understanding of Biochar production process

Previous experience with Biomass boilers or CHPs

Previous experience with renewable energy

Working environment

This role will be primarily based from home, though there is a potential for international travel in order to ensure project success on location.

Company: The Future Forest Company –

Company Location:  Edinburgh

Estimated Salary:

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Keske Publication Shows Central Valley Ripe for Biochar Studies | School of Engineering

10 November, 2021
 

Central Valley natives are accustomed to seeing plumes of smoke from burning tree piles after harvest. This is the traditional way farmers dispose of crop waste, such as trees, nut shells and pruned vines. But there may be a better way to get rid of residual orchard waste that is less harmful to the environment according to research conducted by Professor Catherine Keske.

The solution could be in a charcoal-like substance called biochar. Biochar is high in carbon and created by heating biomass, such as residual orchard waste, at moderate temperatures in a process called pyrolysis. The result is a black, chalky substance that has shown promise for reducing greenhouse gas emissions when applied to soil.

Keske and graduate student Maryam Nematian, who served as lead author, just published the paper “A Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochar Production and the Bioeconomy for Orchard Biomass” in the journal Waste Management. Their work shows that it is technologically possible and economically feasible to use biochar to create a circular bioeconomy for orchard crop residues.

A circular bioeconomy is one that reframes waste, like leftover almond tree branches, as opportunity. It is the opposite of the traditional “take, make, use, dispose” model, said Keske.

“To establish a circular bioeconomy, we propose that instead of disposing of crop residue through open burning, for example, we produce a value-added product like biochar from biomass waste that can have positive economic and environmental impacts,” Keske said. “Crop residues are viewed as ‘value-added’, rather than waste, if we’re able to capture the product and nutrients in a cost-effective manner.”

While Keske isn’t the first to estimate biochar production costs, she does believe their paper is the first to assert the competitiveness of biochar under uncertain conditions with the goal of establishing a bioeconomy. The paper is part of an interdisciplinary research effort funded by the Strategic Growth Council to create markets for products that help California adapt to and reduce climate change.

The Central Valley is ripe for biochar research, considering its agricultural setting, but biochar is still considered experimental with limited market demand. It’s mainly created in small batches and is relatively expensive to make. Other faculty on campus, such as Professor Gerardo Diaz, also study biochar. His lab has analyzed pistachio and almond shells, as well as orchard tree sticks to study the conversion process from biomass to biochar.

For biochar to become more widely adopted, the one thing scientists like Keske need is buy in from those doing the burning. And while environmental benefits are important —the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District intends to ban all ag waste burning as soon as January 2025 — so is the bottom line.

“Cost competitiveness is critical for converting waste into value-added product, and for establishing a bioeconomy,” Keske said.

It also incentives people to change their behaviors. Keske hopes that as biochar becomes more mainstream, its use may appeal to more farmers.

“For biochar to be accepted by mainstream farmers, there needs to be a predictable response in crop yields and soil health, for the investment,” Keske said. “The science is emerging to provide these answers. Our study shows that positive financial gains outweigh costs of a subsidy to convert almond orchard biomass into biochar instead of burning it. We hope that these positive financial gains will encourage biochar production, and that resulting field trials will demonstrate yield and soil benefits.”

University of California, Merced
5200 North Lake Rd.
Merced, CA 95343
Telephone: (209) 228-4400


Give Methow brings in record contributions

10 November, 2021
 

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Development of Kenaf Biochar in Engineering and Agricultural Applications | SpringerLink

10 November, 2021
 

The aim of this review is to investigate the recent development of kenaf derived biochar and its composites in various engineering and agricultural applications including nanostructure catalysts and polymer composites as kenaf biochar and activated carbon are mainly used as material adsorbents and soil amendments. A systematic review on the effect of process parameters of thermal decomposition, pyrolysis towards the production of desired biochar, therefore, is in crucial needs. Based on existing literature, the properties and production of kenaf biomass and resultant biochar are discussed in this paper. This analysis focuses on the unique characteristics of kenaf crops and the resulting biochar, which has a surprisingly large surface area and increased pore volume, to explain their prospective applications, whether in environmental utilization or engineering applications. Range of optimum surface areas for kenaf biochar are around 800–1000 m2/g where they show high adsorption properties. Whereas, the pore volume of activated carbon usually exceeds 1 cm3/g. Recent developments in engineered kenaf biochar technology and its future directions for research and development are also discussed.

Biomass supply systems inherit the expertise of established agriculture and forestry sectors, even though the widespread use of agricultural products and logging wastes for the generation of bioenergy is emerging. Biomass feedstocks are regarded as a clean energy sources due to their efficient and long-term use may significantly reduce the environmental effect of fossil fuels [1, 2]. Thus, biomass feedstocks or also called as renewable carbon source are mainly originated from plants and plant-based materials which were left behind, they are abundant, renewable and the best possible alternatives of sustainable supply for bio fuels, bio products and bio energy generation. According to Faaij [3], biomass feedstocks that can be used for energy are diverse: (1) primary residue, produced during production of food crops and forest products which mainly referred to agricultural or forestry residues; (2) secondary residues, yielded during stage of processing biomass into products at processing facilities like saw-mill; and (3) tertiary residues which related to the biomass derived wastes, varying from the organic components of municipal solid wastes, sludge and waste wood.

Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) is regarded as an industrial crop, and belongs to family Malvaceae and is grown commercially in various geographical regions including Central Africa, India, Bangladesh, Thailand and Malaysia [4, 5]. Kenaf is the most significant cultivated plant for fibre production throughout the globe, second to cotton, and was widely used as medicinal herbs in ancient Africa. It has already been grown in Africa for 4000 years, and its components have been utilized by indigenous tribes for animal feed, food, handcraft production, and fuel [6, 7]. The kenaf crop is gaining popularity as a high-yielding “non-food crop” for fibre production, notably in the newspaper, pulp, and other paper-based industries. Its quick growth and higher yielding rate are associated to the facile pulp processing as well as easy-to-grow, in terms of progressive maturity in dry, shallow and sandy soils, and low-water content environments. Figure 1 shows the scenery in a kenaf field cultivated in one of the Far East countries. Recently, about 79% of total kenaf production belongs to India, China, and Africa, contributing to 46% (100,000 tonnes), 26% and 7% to the world kenaf production, respectively [8].

Calm view of kenaf field in Far East countries [9]

Number of publications with topic of “kenaf biochar” from the year 2012 to 2021 (Source: Scopus, 9 October 2021). Many studies have examined the production of biochars from a wide variety of feedstocks into numerous applications including agricultural [18, 19], engineering [20, 21], wastewater treatments [22], electrochemical uses and renewable energy generation [23], with both positive and negative results. However, from this Fig. 2, there are only 22 publications related to the keyword “kenaf biochar” were discovered in Scopus (9th October 2021) from the year 2012 to 2021. In addition, there are only 57 scholarly works related to “kenaf biochar” were recorded from Lens.org (data extracted from https://www.lens.org on 9th October 2021). According to Web of Science, there are at least only 18 papers found related to the keyword where none of them is review work. Thus, these findings indicate the novelty of this work regarding providing literature review towards research on kenaf biochar throughout the globe. As for the novelties of this work, this paper elaborates on the fundamentals of biochar and its pyrolysis design, chemical and physical characteristics of kenaf biochar, as well as the developments and applications of biochar, especially kenaf derived biochar, in various sectors; agriculture, renewable energy, water purifications and composites engineering

Kenaf is agricultural biomass/feedstock, utilized with the thermal decomposition to yield biochar, from several researchers, prior to exposure with acid chemical activating agent to produce low-price activated carbon [10]. Pyrolysis is the most widely used and successful method for producing biochar, carbonization of biomass [10]. In addition, one of the most significant avenues to better biofuels is thermochemical conversion utilizing the pyrolysis process. In the absence of oxygen, the thermal breakdown converted the biomass solid matrix into gaseous, liquid, and solid components. The primary feedstock compositions and experimental pyrolysis settings impact the features and compositions of these different by-products; which mainly dominated by the production of solid biochar [11, 12]. Biochar, a porous carbon comparable to activated carbon, offers numerous agronomic and environmental beneficial effects, including soil improvement, surface pollution adsorption, and inorganic and organic pollutant remediation in grounds [13].

Biochar, charcoal, and activated carbons are three carbon compounds with a lot of similarities in structure and processing mechanics [14, 15]. In anaerobic environments, biochar propensity for lower temperatures, below 700 °C, is particularly advantageous with respect to minimal maintenance relative to activated carbon manufacturing. Furthermore, because of its large surface area, comparable porosity, and functional groups, biochar has the same great promise as activated carbon to be used as an adsorbent in water treatment. Evaluating a biomass source’s biochar potential is an environmentally interesting method since the material is readily available in huge quantities which is also readily decomposed [16]. The biochar generated was not further burned to generate energy; instead, it was used as a soil amendment, where it has been found to enhance water and nutrient storage, reduce bulk density, and enhance pH values [17] to be utilized for several applications.

Kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus L.) has been grown for its stem-derived fibres, which are often used for rope, during the last decade, as shown in Fig. 3. After fibre extraction, the rest of the plant is either left in nature or burned for heating or cooking, which plainly pollutes the environment. Furthermore, kenaf is regarded to be one of the most promising plants, leads to improved agricultural practices, enhanced processing processes, and research on future development [24]. Kenaf is a tropical annual herbaceous plant that is used in agriculture. This fibrous, herbaceous plant ranks third in biomass output and exhibits rapid growth rate, which takes less than 6 months to reach a size to be considered as matured suitable for practical uses [25]. The use of kenaf fibre cellulose has both environmental and economic benefits; for instance, it can grow up to 3 m tall with a 3–5 cm base diameter in 3 months under such a broad range of climatic circumstances, making it ideal for natural fibre surfaces and composites [26, 27]. When compared to other plants as potential sources of biochar materials, the crop provides a low-cost and ecologically safe choice in terms of its high fibre and cellulose component. Furthermore, kenaf is readily generated and widely available, particularly in tropical areas; these important features make kenaf an excellent biochar material [16]. Long fibres make for roughly 30% of the overall plant volume, whereas short fibres account for the remaining 70% of the plant volume [10].

Kenaf plants as biomass feedstocks [28, 29]

Kenaf is a multipurpose plant which could provide a variety of lucrative by-products for consumers and businesses. As a result, kenaf is widely utilized in pulp, paper, and cardboard manufacturing, as well as fibre reinforced composites, natural fuels, cellulose products, absorbent agents, and animal feed [30]. Kenaf has a low density, is very absorbent, is non-abrasive during processing, has excellent specific mechanical characteristics, and is biodegradable. Turning char by-product into carbon particles is one of the value-added benefits [2]. The carbon compounds might be employed in water and beverage purification systems, as well as in electrode manufacturing technologies as supercapacitor electrodes. The size distribution, surface area, pore diameters, and flexibility of biochar determine its quality. The mass ratio, milling hours, and sample post-treatment all play a role in producing high-quality biochars. These can be obtained by fine-tuning the process parameters throughout the manufacturing process [31]. Consequently, biochar generated from kenaf fibres, which originate from its stems and leaves, has been utilized in a wide range of applications, including wastewater treatment [32], biofuels generation including biogas, bioethanol, biodiesel, and biohydrogen [9], polymer composites [33, 34], and horticultural substrate synthesis [35].

The dried kenaf stems are shown in Fig. 4. The ultimate and proximate analyses, as well as the inorganic concentration in the kenaf samples, are shown in Table 1. The results are within the range of typical agricultural and food processing residue compositions described in the literature [24, 36]. The carbon content of raw kenaf is estimated to be around 47.32 wt%, according to the elemental composition of ultimate analysis. In addition, the production of biochar due to slow pyrolysis suggesting a fixed carbon content of 15.80 wt%. From the study, the heating value (HHV) and low heating value (LHV) of the kenaf fibre is 18.54 MJ/kg and 17.38 MJ/kg, respectively, which is comparable to the HHV of other biomasses [23, 37].

Dried kenaf stems

The elemental composition study in Table 2 reveals that the major minerals found in the kenaf stems are K (20.59 g/kg), Ca (8.16 g/kg), P (3.29 g/kg), and Mg (1.75 g/kg). These components, in its char yielded via slow pyrolysis, are extremely beneficial to plant growth and development.

Chemical composition variations occur along the stalks/branches of kenaf plant. From the bottom part of the stalks or branches to the top, the concentration of α-cellulose, lignin, and ash declines. This was hypothesized as mature tissues acquire more metabolic products than younger tissues located at the top part [38]. Several studies [39,40,41], however, have shown that the bast and core differ significantly in morphologic structure as well as in chemical composition.

Chemically, the chemical components of kenaf bast and core were significantly distinct. Table 3 shows the chemical analytical results for the entire kenaf (including its core and bast), kenaf core and bast [24, 36]. Excluding the ash, the percentages of all the chemical components of kenaf (non-wood) are more or less identical to those of wood products, according to the findings of this study. When compared to wood products, kenaf had a higher ash content. This demonstrated that the non-wood fibres had a significant silica content, which was known to be a disadvantage in mechanical strength qualities for the end products [40, 42]. The ash content of whole kenaf, its core, and its bast fibers was 4%, 1.9%, and 5.4%, respectively. Extractive was often wasted and was not utilized in manufacturing and production.

According to Table 3, the percentage of chemical composition in kenaf fibres showed that kenaf core fibres were higher in holocellulose and lignin, whereas kenaf bast fibres were higher in α-cellulose and ash content when compared to others [44]. The high α-cellulose content of bast fibre is assumed to provide high strength in paper formation and other fibre end products. It was mentioned that the cellulose (bast fibre 52–59%, core 44–46%) and lignin (bast fibre 9.3–13.2%, core 18.3–23.2%) contents of the kenaf plant increased significantly during maturation [45]. Figure 5 shows the SEM images of kenaf core fibres and bast fibres.

Scanning electron micrograph of kenaf fibre at different parts: transverse section of a core fibres, and b bast fibres; longitudinal section of c core fibres, and d bast fibres

Kenaf lignin was comprised of three major lignin units in varying ratios: p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl, and syringyl. The total lignin content of the kenaf stalk (core and bast) was approximately 21.2%, which was higher than the results acquired by Kuroda et al. [39]. Due to their reduced lignin composition, the core and bast samples comprised 19.2% and 14.7% lignin, respectively, which was slightly lower than that of softwood (21–37%) and is favourable for pulping compared to wood. The analysis of plant material samples at different heights/lengths revealed that lignin and cellulose concentration vary with tissue maturity however do not vary considerably within each species. Paper strength is also affected by the lignin and cellulose content of raw plant materials; pulp mechanical strength, particularly tensile strength, is directly proportional to cellulose content, whereas lignin is an undesirable polymer that requires a lot of energy and chemicals to remove during the pulping process [40].

Biochar is a solid residue generated through the thermal decomposition of biomass into fuel by-products [46], and it has traditionally been considered as a lower-value by-product compared to syngas and bio-oil, which are even more desirable. Kenaf biochar is produced by carbonizing kenaf stems at 1000 °C in an inert environment [47, 48]. From another work, according to Yusof et al. [31], biochar is made from biomass compounds that are pyrolysed/gasified under controlled conditions in the absence of oxygen at temperatures ranging from 300 to 1000 °C. Incomplete gasification produced charcoal, also known as bio-char or agri-char, which is a by-product of pyrolysis technology used in biofuel and ammonia manufacturing. These processes created a large amount of biochar, necessitating a greater use of it. It is also possible to assist agricultural operations become more sustainable, dependable, and tangibly create a healthier green environment, despite the fact that it may be turned from waste to wealth [31].

Based on previous works, Saeed et al. [50] proposed the value range of the pyrolysis temperature for kenaf from 300 to 600 °C. The range was chosen based on prior research’s recommendations [31, 32, 51] which stated that the kenaf mass loss was attributed to three main stages: (1) drying and evaporation of light particles, happened at temperatures below 150 °C, (2) volatilization of hemicellulose and cellulose, started degassing from 150 to 375 °C, and (3) decomposition of lignin, at temperatures above 400 °C. As a result, the suggested pyrolysis temperature range was 300–600 °C, which helped convert lignin into biochar while also keeping biochar stable. The pyrolysis temperature generally dominates the impact of residence time. As a result, determining the effect of residence time in biochar stability might be difficult at times [52]. The heating rate was set at 10 °C/min, which was deemed low though ideal for generating biochar from agricultural biomass [53] (Fig. 6). Moreover, a lower heating rate facilitated the development of aromatic structures in biochar and the preservation of structural complexity, whereas a high heating rate promoted the loss of structural complexity owing to local melting of cell structures, phase transitions, and swelling [54] (Table 4).

Schematic illustrations of a horizontal pyrolysis reactor (such as rotary kiln reactor) and b vertical pyrolysis reactor (such as free-fall reactor) used to pyrolysed biomass feedstocks [23, 49]

When activated, microporous carbon with a large surface area generated in this way might be employed in pollution removal [58]. In anaerobic circumstances, biochars propensity for lower temperatures (below 700 °C) is particularly advantageous in perspective of minimal maintenance contrasted to activated char manufacturing. On the other hand, the heating value of kenaf residues in the fluidized bed gasification method is thought to be inefficient for generating electricity [59], even if the generated gas could fulfil the demand for energy generation by gas engines.

Furthermore, several pyrolysis products produced from the entire kenaf were discovered [10, 16, 24, 31], mainly bio-oil and biochar, with the possible to be transformed into more valuable chemicals, and their distribution was found to be comparable to that of hardwood, which the primary products are syringol and guaiacol compounds. The phenol concentration of the kenaf core pyrolysate was greater than that of the kenaf cuticle, indicating that the kenaf core had more lignin. Kenaf has a low overall bio-oil production when equalled to wood, yet a high yield when compared to other agricultural crops [60].

Biochar is one of the most important kenaf stems pyrolysis by-products. Biochar will be produced during the final pyrolysis of kenaf feedstocks as shown in Fig. 7. Several main pyrolytic parameters, including such process temperature, heating rate, feed rate, catalysts, and pressure, will influence the formation of biochar [2, 63]. According to previous studies, the biochar yields are decreases with increasing of the used pyrolysis temperature [64]. The char obtained by pyrolysis will be characterized via several analyses.

a FESEM images of kenaf biochar pyrolyzed at 450 °C and b image of kenaf biochar yielded via slow pyrolysis [55]

Table 5 lists the chemical properties of kenaf biochars as determined. The carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur and ash content of kenaf biochar were approximately between 40.0–90.0, 1.0–3.0, 0.01–1.20, 10.0–50.0, 0.0–0.5, and 10.0–40.0%, respectively. Proximate analyses of the different biochars are summarized in Table 6. Comparison between the different pyrolysis temperatures shows higher amounts of volatiles matter at 400 °C which decrease with increasing of temperature from 34.5 to 19.9 wt% at 600 °C. On the contrary, the weight loss associated with the fixed carbon increases with the increase of pyrolysis temperature from 60.2 to 73.2 wt%. Similar trend is recorded for ashes. Such result can be attributed to the low inorganic contents which is vital due to their abilities to produce low ash and high fixed carbon contents [36].

Table 7 reveals that Mg and K are the most abundant mineral elements in the charcoal. Kenaf biochar contains non-negligible amounts of Ca, P, Zn, and Na. As a result of the decomposition/devolatilization of a portion of the kenaf, the biochars are rich in carbon and minerals. As a result, the use of kenaf char as an agricultural additive might be suggested.

Charcoals are non-specific or at least poorly specific adsorbents, exhibiting numerous macro-and transition pores of various diameters, and as a consequence of the large surface areas. Range of optimum surface areas for kenaf biochar are around 800–1000 m2/g where they show high adsorption properties [68]. Table 5 shows the findings of the BET surface area study and the textural characteristics of the kenaf biochars. The observed values are rather high, which is a significant benefit for using kenaf biochars to remove contaminants from effluents. The kenaf biochars’ specific surface area was estimated using the BET technique and CO2 adsorption isotherms. According to Khiari et al. [24], the surface area of the produced biochar increased considerably from 162 to 261 m2/g as the pyrolysis temperature increased. This progression is explained by a change in the textural characteristics of the biochars, which can be related to the minor devolatilization observed between 400 and 500 °C, which creates more microporosity in the carbon matrix. In addition, greater temperatures appear to influence the porosity of the char [16].

The surface of the biochars grew rougher and more porous as the pyrolysis temperature high. The organic component of pyrolyzed kenaf at high temperatures vanished owing to devolatilization/decomposition, resulting in pyrolyzed kenaf with a rough surface [9]. Cho et al. [55] observed that when the pyrolysis temperature increased, the specific surface area of kenaf biochar grew dramatically from 5 to 270 m2/g, which is improved > 65 times, and even the porosity of kenaf biochar enhanced. Previous studies [2, 69, 70] has also found that when the pyrolysis temperature rises, the specific surface area increases by more than tenfold. The liberation of volatile organic chemicals and the oxidative breaking of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin are due to the rise in specific surface area caused by pyrolysis temperature increase [55]. Furthermore, inside the biochar that was pyrolyzed at high temperatures, a complex pore structure with a rough surface was discovered as a result of dissolving the unstable component and softening the stable structure in biomass, which resulted in shrinkage, collapse, and melting of the pore [71].

Raman spectroscopy is used to determine phase and polymorphisms, as well as pollution and impurities. Figure 8 depicts Raman spectrometry curves from this investigation by Khiari et al. [24]. The Raman spectra at 400 °C showed a signal with no discernible peaks, which was attributable to the high amount of amorphous carbon structures generated at low pyrolysis temperatures. The Raman spectra at 500 °C showed two relatively large Raman bands at 1300 and 1600 cm−1. The D-band is associated with sp2 bonded carbon with structural flaws, whereas the G-band is associated with the in-plane vibrations of sp2 bonded graphitic carbon structures. The valley area “V” between the D-band and the G-band is connected to the amorphous carbon structure. Structure characteristics such as ID (D band intensity height), IG (G band intensity height), IV (valley region intensity height) and the distinct ratios ID/IG, IV/IG, and IV/ID have been computed from these spectra in order to obtain detailed information on the structure of the individual chars [24].

Raman spectra of the kenaf biochar produced at 400, 500 and 600 °C [24]

The IV/ID and IV/IG ratio decreases due to the char evolution structure with pyrolysis severity from amorphous to more organized carbon (turbostratic char). As for ID/IG, this ratio decreases indicating an increase of the proportion of condensed aromatic ring structures having defects. Condensation of tiny aromatic amorphous carbon structures results in D structures. These findings are consistent with the results observed for exhausted grape marc char after various thermal treatments [72], see Fig. 9. This behavior can be due to the significant amount of amorphous carbon structures formed during low-temperature pyrolysis [57]. The Raman spectra above 500 °C showed two reasonably wide Raman bands. The other biochar has a similar tendency. This behaviour may be described by the char evolution structure with the severity of pyrolysis from amorphous carbon to structured carbon (turbostratic char).

Raman spectra of the grape marc biochars produced at different temperature [57]

Lacks in wastewater treatment happened when there are no alternatives in purifying and treating the sludge prior to disposal. Sludge with a high concentration of heavy metals such as Fe, Ti, Mn, Zn, As, Cu, Ni, Zr, and Ga is often disposed of in landfills [11]. The recovery of valuable minerals like manganese from sludge is an alternative to zero disposal of solid wastes and a means to reduce pollution emission into the environment. It may be accomplished by adsorption, which is a low-cost, versatile, and simple-to-implement technique. Kenaf derived biochar which then chemically activated into activated carbon has been shown to be an excellent adsorbent material for heavy metals removal. The goal of this research is to use kenaf fibre as activated carbon in batch adsorption to recover heavy metals from wastewater sludge. The adsorption effectiveness of adsorbents was studied in relation to contact time, sludge pH, and temperature as well as its surface area and pore properties. The results indicated that the newly produced kenaf activated carbon and biochar are the most possible alternative adsorbents for heavy metals [50].

According to a batch adsorption research [13], kenaf fibre-derived activated carbon is capable of removing 30% of the heavy metal element from the sludge. It was also discovered that the optimum removal occurs in a neutral pH solution, that increasing contact duration increases equilibrium absorption, and that raising temperature increases the amount of heavy metal removal [13]. The development of heavy metal removal methods for aquatic environments is in great demand. Saeed et al. [10] had investigated the pyrolysis of raw materials including rice husk and kenaf fibre as agricultural lignocellulosic wastes for the adsorption of Cu2+. The surface area of biochar produced increases proportionately to the increasing quantity of kenaf fibre in the mixing ratio rice husk/kenaf fibre as biomass feedstocks, according to BET characterization findings. This morphology and surface area analysis revealed that pure biochars made from kenaf fibre had a lot of promise as adsorbents. However, blending both fibres does not provide the intended outcome for utilization as an adsorbent, which has a detrimental impact on biochar production since the oxygen-to-carbon and hydrogen-to-carbon ratios were outside the usual range, affecting biochar stability. As a result, it impacted copper ion adsorption from aqueous solutions [10].

In another work from Saeed et al. [61], the adsorption study on cadmium materials had resulted with optimum adsorption under pH 5–6. The textural characteristics of biochars, such as surface area and pore volume, were improved by increasing the amount of oxygen-containing groups and creating inner-sphere complexes with oxygen-containing groups. Increased adsorption capacity was achieved by increasing the initial ion concentration and solution temperature. The use of iron oxide on the surface of biochar to impart a magnetic characteristic allowed for simple separation and regeneration using an external magnet. In comparison to pure biochar, the magnetic biochar composite had a greater affinity for Cd2+. By acid treating kenaf fibre biochar with HCl, an adsorbent was created. In batch system experiments, the treatment increased the BET surface area, which resulted in an increase in the adsorption of methylene blue dye (MB). Variations in the initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage, pH, and temperature were used to examine the adsorption process. At a concentration of 50 mg/L, the greatest percentage removal of MB was determined to be 95 wt%. The dye sorption was optimal at a pH of 8.5 [32].

Ferjani et al. [57] studied three agricultural biomass including grape marc, kenaf stems, and flax shive, for biochar production. For a future possible application in agriculture, the pyrolysis operation was carried out at 400, 500, and 600 °C with a continuous heating gradient rate of 5 °C/min. The biochar yields declined as the applied pyrolysis temperature increased, but remained relatively stable at 500 °C for all feedstocks, according to the results. Grape marc and kenaf contain the largest quantity of theoretically accessible minerals, as well as an intriguing surface area and microporosity value, according to their physico-chemical characteristics [57]. These characteristics make biochars excellent for soil improvements and the adsorption of contaminants from environment.

Yao et al. [73] had successfully investigated the utilization of biochar derived from Mg-enriched tomato tissues in order to adsorb and recover phosphate from wastewater, which was then cycled back into grounds as an efficient slow-release phosphate fertilizer. According to Vithanage et al. [74], acid treatment enhanced the specific surface area of bur-cucumber derived biochar, exhibit better sulfamethazine adsorption ability and should be utilized as possible soil bioremediation suitable for sulfamethazine-polluted soils.

Biochar has been utilized as an electro catalyst and photo catalyst in the electrochemical water-splitting process to produce hydrogen and oxygen [75, 76]. The addition of a heteroatom produces active sites in biochar, allowing for a more efficient hydrogen evolution process (HER). S-doped and N-doped biochars produced from peanut root nodule (see Fig. 10), for example, have been shown to be effective HER electro catalysts. Because of its large electrochemical area of 27.4 mF/cm2, the doped biochar demonstrated an outstanding onset potential of 27 mV compared to reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) for HER, which is similar to a commercial Pt/C catalyst with a loading of 20 wt% [77]. Figure 10 shows the effect of S and N doping into carbon on HER. The flowing process was as follows: (a) H atom was combined on the C atom; H atom was combined on the N (b) or S (d) dopant atom; H atom was combined on the C atom around N (c) or S (e) dopant atom.

Structural models and charge density of H adsorbed on the surface of graphene, N-doped graphene and S-doped graphene. The blue and yellow symbols represent a drop in charge density and a rise in charge density, respectively

Nanostructure catalysts made from sunflower seed shell charcoal and molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) nanoparticles are another example. At an over potential of only 60 mV, this integrated electro catalyst produced a current density of 10 mA cm2 for HER. Most notably, this catalyst has a near-unity faradaic efficiency and is extremely durable [78]. Growth of molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) nanosheets on a carbon fibre aerogel is another example. Cotton wool biomass was used to make the carbon aerogel. At an onset potential of 104 mV, this MoSe2/carbon fibre electro catalyst demonstrated HER vs RHE [79]. Without a doubt, current biochar catalyst performance lags well below that of the most effective water-splitting catalysts, with over-potentials of 13 and 17 mV at a current density of 10 mA/cm2 [80]. It does, however, have the potential to be employed as an abundant alternative catalyst material for the generation of hydrogen and oxygen.

The utilization of biomass waste materials to manufacture activated carbons has become a huge technology in carbon supercapacitor electrodes [81, 82]. Various kind of agricultural biomass including cotton stalks [83], discarded coffee beans [84], seaweed biopolymers [85], corn stovers [86], roselle [87, 88], and sugarcane bagasse [89] have all been reported as carbon electrodes in supercapacitors. The carbon precursor and modification circumstances utilised ascertain the electrochemical attributes of double-layer capacitance, including such high surface area, porosity distribution, conductivity, as well as the existence of electrochemically active surface functional groups, and hence impact the performance [82, 90]. Because of their enormous surface areas, relative inertness, and abundant possibilities for doping and structural tweaking, carbons generated from biomass play such an important role in electrochemistry [91].

Biochars may be utilized in a variety of horticultural applications, such as replacing peat moss on soilless substrates for containerized greenhouse and nursery crops. Hardwood pellets and pelletized wheat straw were used to make biochar via pyrolysis as shown in Fig. 11. The potassium concentration and pH of straw biochar were greater than those of wood biochar [46]. In comparison to non-activated biochar, steam activation of biochar might hasten its beneficial effects on nutrient retention and uptake by plants. In all cases, steam activation almost doubled the beneficial benefits of biochars, making it a promising choice in order to use biochar in future [92]. After modification, biochars’ adsorption ability of nitrate and phosphate improves, implying that activated biochars could also be used as adsorbent materials to reduce nutrient loss in grounds and for further horticultural purposes [93] (Table 8).

Schematic illustrations of thermal decomposition of raw biomass [46]

There is difficult to find any published works on kenaf derived biochar uses in composite applications. However, it is remarkably found that the surface area (approximately 120–300 m2/g) and micropore volumes (over 0.088 cm3/g) of kenaf biochar is quite similar to the other commercialised biochars such as durian rind, sugarcane bagasse, rice straw and corn straw, as according to previous works [10, 24, 31]. Thus, numerous applications could be found in composite engineering with the contribution from distinct characteristics of kenaf biochar based composites including production of magnetic biochar for low-cost supercapacitor application [94], low-price novel engineered adsorbents [95], biochar composite-based catalysts [96], bacterial/biochar composites for bioremediation [97], and antibacterial composite for water treatment [98].

Despite the difficulties in finding research work on kenaf biochar uses in composites engineering, biochar derived from other biomass feedstocks had been widely commercialised as reported in literature. Matykiewicz [99] had fabricated carbon fibre reinforced biochar/epoxy composites for mechanical reinforcements. From the results, the mechanical and thermal properties of the biochar reinforced composites improved by almost 5% compared to the neat one. Das et al. [100] had utilized biochar originated from pine wood waste as reinforcement agents within polypropylene matrix, the biochar exhibits comparable carbon content of 82 wt% and specific surface area, 335 m2/g, as of kenaf biochar. Thus, large surface area of the engineered biochar allowed polypropylene to flow, resulting in mechanical interlocking and improved mechanical characteristics [11, 101].

Conclusively, biochar should be used in biocomposites to increase its usefulness and generate better composites while also managing waste in a sustainable manner [102]. However, no research including kenaf derived biochar in biocomposites have been done so far. As a result, this opinion may encourage researchers to investigate the use of the biochar in biocomposites.

In this paper, current developments of kenaf-derived biochar and its composites in engineering and agricultural applications, such as nanostructure catalysts and polymer composites, had been discussed. Kenaf biochar and activated carbon are mostly utilized as soil amendments and material adsorbents, and they are yet to be utilized in other engineering applications such as biocomposites, supercapacitors and optical applications. Thus, thorough literature review on the influence of process parameters of thermal decomposition, pyrolysis, and biochar formation on the manufacture of desired biochar is critical. This review had been focused on the unique characteristics of kenaf crops and the resulting biochar, which has a surprisingly large surface area and increased pore volume, in order to explain their prospective use, whether in environmental or technical applications. Recent advances in engineered kenaf biochar technology, as well as future research and development directions, were briefly highlighted. As a result of the preceding debate, it is obvious that low-cost, environmentally friendly, green, and facile processing products must be taken into account for solving current environmental issues toward sustainable environment in the future. Thus, it is paramount to create approaches and products that (1) reduce the usage of fossil fuels, (2) recycling trash, and (3) are biodegradable plus environmentally friendly.

Kenaf biochar promises to be a novel potentially cost-effective and ecologically friendly carbon material with a wide range of applications. Despite the fact that current research on the manufacture and application of activated biochar in a variety of fields is expanding [103], a number of research gaps still exist. The following ideas are suggested to alleviate these gaps in knowledge:

The characteristics of activated biochar may be considerably affected by feedstock with varied compositions, manufacturing circumstances, and activation parameters of biochar. Future research will be required to select feedstock with acceptable compositions, as well as optimize production circumstances and activation parameters, in order to create biochar with appropriate and intended characteristics for specific uses.

More relevant and innovative treatments for activation, as well as improvements to existing techniques, are required. Furthermore, using multiple main activation methods for biochar activation may give a good opportunity to improve activation efficiency by integrating the benefits of diverse approaches.

The majority of biochar applications are focused on water pollution remediation, whereas applications for CO2 capture and energy storage are comparatively underutilized and should be broadened. Furthermore, there are several possible applications for activated biochar that should be studied in the future. It might be utilized as a novel possible in-situ amendment for polluted soil and sediment management, for example.

For future practical engineering applications of biochar, more research are required to gain insight into the issues surrounding its large-scale manufacturing, scaled-up application, stability, reuses, and wasted biochar management.

The author gratefully acknowledged Ministry of Higher Education (MoHE) for funding this project via Post COVID-19 Special Research Grant 2020 (Vote No. 5540346), University of Minho, Portugal for the invitation to present the similar finding, and also Universiti Putra Malaysia for providing research facilities. Special thanks as well for Mohamed Mehdi Chehimi, Executive Editor-in-Chief of Chemistry Africa, for the publication invitations.

Correspondence to S. M. Sapuan.

Received: 16 August 2021

Accepted: 27 October 2021

Published: 10 November 2021

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s42250-021-00293-1


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10 November, 2021
 

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Biochar? : r/NoTillGrowery – Reddit

10 November, 2021
 


Global Granular Biochar Market 2021 Report Development Trends and Company Profile

10 November, 2021
 

The new Global Granular Biochar Market report from Market Research Place provides insight into industry or market patterns for the years 2015-2019 and the projections year 2021-2027. The study ranks all sections and areas regarding market size, participation, advancements, income streams, and average increase. An assessment of the global context regarding current and future possibilities for assisting the global Granular Biochar market’s future growth.

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Keske Publication Shows Central Valley Ripe for Biochar Studies | Newsroom – UC Merced News

10 November, 2021
 

Central Valley natives are accustomed to seeing plumes of smoke from burning tree piles after harvest. This is the traditional way farmers dispose of crop waste, such as trees, nut shells and pruned vines. But there may be a better way to get rid of residual orchard waste that is less harmful to the environment according to research conducted by Professor Catherine Keske.

The solution could be in a charcoal-like substance called biochar. Biochar is high in carbon and created by heating biomass, such as residual orchard waste, at moderate temperatures in a process called pyrolysis. The result is a black, chalky substance that has shown promise for reducing greenhouse gas emissions when applied to soil.

Keske and graduate student Maryam Nematian, who served as lead author, just published the paper “A Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochar Production and the Bioeconomy for Orchard Biomass” in the journal Waste Management. Their work shows that it is technologically possible and economically feasible to use biochar to create a circular bioeconomy for orchard crop residues.

A circular bioeconomy is one that reframes waste, like leftover almond tree branches, as opportunity. It is the opposite of the traditional “take, make, use, dispose” model, said Keske.

“To establish a circular bioeconomy, we propose that instead of disposing of crop residue through open burning, for example, we produce a value-added product like biochar from biomass waste that can have positive economic and environmental impacts,” Keske said. “Crop residues are viewed as ‘value-added’, rather than waste, if we’re able to capture the product and nutrients in a cost-effective manner.”

While Keske isn’t the first to estimate biochar production costs, she does believe their paper is the first to assert the competitiveness of biochar under uncertain conditions with the goal of establishing a bioeconomy. The paper is part of an interdisciplinary research effort funded by the Strategic Growth Council to create markets for products that help California adapt to and reduce climate change.

The Central Valley is ripe for biochar research, considering its agricultural setting, but biochar is still considered experimental with limited market demand. It’s mainly created in small batches and is relatively expensive to make. Other faculty on campus, such as Professor Gerardo Diaz, also study biochar. His lab has analyzed pistachio and almond shells, as well as orchard tree sticks to study the conversion process from biomass to biochar.

For biochar to become more widely adopted, the one thing scientists like Keske need is buy in from those doing the burning. And while environmental benefits are important —the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District intends to ban all ag waste burning as soon as January 2025 — so is the bottom line.

“Cost competitiveness is critical for converting waste into value-added product, and for establishing a bioeconomy,” Keske said.

It also incentives people to change their behaviors. Keske hopes that as biochar becomes more mainstream, its use may appeal to more farmers.

“For biochar to be accepted by mainstream farmers, there needs to be a predictable response in crop yields and soil health, for the investment,” Keske said. “The science is emerging to provide these answers. Our study shows that positive financial gains outweigh costs of a subsidy to convert almond orchard biomass into biochar instead of burning it. We hope that these positive financial gains will encourage biochar production, and that resulting field trials will demonstrate yield and soil benefits.”

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Who is Malala Yousafzai's husband Asser Malik? – NewsIn.Asia

10 November, 2021
 

Nov 10 (Independent) – Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai announced on Tuesday she had married Asser Malik, a manager with Pakistan’s cricket governing body, at a small ceremony in Birmingham.

The 24-year-old human rights activist and educationist wrote: “Today marks a precious day in my life. Asser and I tied the knot to be partners for life. We celebrated a small nikkah ceremony at home in Birmingham with our families. Please send us your prayers. We are excited to walk together for the journey ahead.”

For similar articles, join our Telegram channel for the latest updates. – click here

Ms Yousafzai’s husband is a high-performance general manager at the Pakistan’s cricket governing body, the Pakistan Cricket Board, according to his LinkedIn profile.

He joined the board in May 2020 and worked with the Pakistan Super League (PSL) franchise Multan Sultans previously as an operational manager.

READ: Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai gets married, shares photos from wedding

He also owns an amateur league franchise called Last Man Stands in Pakistan, an endeavour he described on LinkedIn as an attempt to revive grassroots cricket in an organised and structured manner.

Today marks a precious day in my life.
Asser and I tied the knot to be partners for life. We celebrated a small nikkah ceremony at home in Birmingham with our families. Please send us your prayers. We are excited to walk together for the journey ahead.
📸: @malinfezehai pic.twitter.com/SNRgm3ufWP

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Webinar on “Production of Nutrients Enriched Biochar for Organic Agriculture” – Lanka News Web

10 November, 2021
 

          High Commission of India in association with Sri Lanka Council for Agricultural Research Policy (SLCARP) organized a webinar on “Production of Nutrients Enriched Biochar for Organic Agriculture” by Dr. Manish Kumar, Principal Scientist, CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Material Technology, Bhubaneswar, India on 09 November 2021. It was attended by about 70 participants including Scientists, academics and policy makers of Sri Lanka where deliberations were held on conversion of bio wastes into Biochar for use in Organic Agriculture.
 
2.       Prof. Gamini Senanayake, Chairman, SLCARP in his introductory remark highlighted the importance of the webinar in the pretext of the decision of the Government of Sri Lanka to adopt organic agriculture practices.

3.       In his brief remarks, Dr. Sushil Kumar, Head of Technical Cooperation in the High Commission highlighted that Agriculture is a vital component of the multi-dimensional India – Sri Lanka partnership. Academic & research collaboration are being undertaken under the ‘Work Plan’ signed between the SLCARP and the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR).

4.       Other prominent participants at webinar included Dr Gamini Samarasinghe, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture, Dr Samanthi Wasala, Deputy Director General of Agriculture, Dr Deepani Alawathugoda, Additional Conservator of Forest and Amb. Sumith Nakandala, Former Additional Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

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XPRIZE and Musk Foundation Name 23 Winners in Five Million Dollar Carbon … – Yahoo Finance

10 November, 2021
 

Selected from 195 University-Affiliated Proposals, Winning Teams Showcased New Concepts & Supporting Technologies for Scalable Carbon Dioxide Removal

LOS ANGELES, November 10, 2021–(BUSINESS WIRE)–XPRIZE, the global leader in designing and implementing innovative competition models to solve the world’s grandest challenges, today announced that 23 student-led teams have won the $5M Carbon Removal Student Competition. The award program, which is part of the $100 Million XPRIZE for Carbon Removal supported by the Musk Foundation, was launched, in part, to fund early stage concepts from the next generation of carbon removal innovators and to remove barriers to entry for those interested in the main competition.

Competing student teams had the opportunity to submit their concepts for an award in one of two tracks, Carbon Dioxide Removal Demonstrations or Measurement, Reporting, and Verification Technologies. Winning student teams are able to use funds to compete in subsequent rounds of XPRIZE Carbon Removal or to develop key supporting technologies which will enable carbon dioxide removal. Points of focus for the two award tracks were as follows:

Carbon Dioxide Removal Demonstrations: Awards of US$250,000 to student teams intending to compete for the XPRIZE Carbon Removal Milestone and Grand Prize awards across the various carbon removal pathways: Air, Land, Rocks, Oceans. Teams needed to convince the judges that their proposed carbon removal projects would make them competitive applicants in the overall competition. This was the main focus of the Student Awards; the majority of awards are in this category.

Measurement, Reporting, and Verification Technologies: Awards of US$100,000 for the development of technologies that may not directly remove CO2, but will enable carbon removal. Technologies or methodologies for improving the standards of assessment, or the precision, accuracy, and time required for carbon measurements were considered.

Representing ten countries and 31 international educational institutions, the winners of the Carbon Removal Student Competition, included:

Student Carbon Removal Demonstrations:

Answer of Biochar (AOB) from Northeastern University, China (China)

E-quester from the University of Toronto (Canada)

BioCORE from the University of Munich (Germany)

Biosorra from IESE Business School and the Fuqua School of Business (Spain & United States)

Bison Underground affiliated with the University of Oklahoma (United States)

Blue Symbiosis from the University of Tasmania IMAS AMC (Australia)

C2 (C-Squared) from Virginia Tech and the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry (Germany & United States)

Carbon Down Under from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale (United States)

CyanoCapture from the University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

Holocene Climate from Stanford University (United States)

KFC from Hohai University, Tianjin University, Shanghai Ocean University, and Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences (China)

Mississippi State Energy Club – BECReative Energy from Mississippi State University (United States)

Monash Carbon Capture and Conversion (BioTech) from Monash University (Australia & Malaysia)

SASIITB from Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India)

Skyrenu Technologies from Université De Sherbrooke and Inrs-Eau Terre Environnement Research Centre (Canada)

Sydney Sustainable Carbon from the University of Sydney (Australia)

Takachar (Safi Organics) from the University of British Columbia, Northeastern University and IISC Bangalore (Canada, India, Kenya & United States)

UW-Madison Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

Measurement, Reporting, and Verification Technologies:

ACIDD Project from the University of Miami (United States)

BJU Global Challenges from Bob Jones University (United States)

Environmental Sensing from the University of Wyoming (United States)

PlantVillage from Pennsylvania State University (United States)

Working Trees from Stanford University (United States)

In order to be eligible for the Carbon Removal Student Competition, student teams needed at least 50% of their members to be currently enrolled in an educational institution with the support of an academic advisor or business leader able to act as a formal mentor. All submissions were reviewed by a panel of expert third-party judges who considered the innovation, ability to reach gigaton scale, team resources and capabilities as well as project plan feasibility in their selection process.

"We want to make a truly meaningful impact. Carbon negativity, not neutrality. The ultimate goal is scalable carbon extraction technologies that are measured based on the ‘fully considered cost per ton’ which includes the environmental impact. This is not a theoretical competition; we want teams that will build real systems that can make a measurable impact and scale to a gigaton level. Whatever it takes. Time is of the essence," said Elon Musk, Founder and CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, in a previous statement.

Launched in April, XPRIZE Carbon Removal is a US$100M four-year global competition that invites innovators and teams from anywhere on the planet to create and demonstrate solutions that can pull carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere or oceans. To win the grand prize, teams must demonstrate a working solution at a scale of at least 1000 tonnes removed per year; model their costs at a scale of 1 million tonnes per year; and show a pathway to achieving a scale of gigatonnes per year in future, as validated by a third party.

"Today’s college and graduate students have proclaimed that solving the climate crisis is one of the most important objectives of their generation. It’s for this reason that this student competition is so critical. Our mission is to engage, inspire and guide the next generation of climate entrepreneurs," said Peter H. Diamandis, Founder and Executive Chairman of XPRIZE.

Any carbon negative solution is eligible: nature-based, direct air capture, oceans, mineralization, or anything else that achieves net negative emissions, sequesters CO2 durably, and shows a sustainable path to ultimately achieving gigatonne scale.

"The climate crisis is an existential threat that demands both immediate action, and a long-term commitment to bringing Earth’s carbon cycle back into balance for future generations," said Dr. Marcius Extavour, Vice President of Climate and Environment at XPRIZE. "We’ve already begun to feel the impacts of the climate crisis in our day-to-day lives, and the data shows us that we need both immediate action on emissions reductions, and sustained innovation to develop additional tools like carbon removal. That’s why this prize is so important. It’s about mobilizing and facilitating the development of scalable solutions that can make a real difference in stabilizing the climate over the coming decades."

For more information on XPRIZE Carbon Removal, to view the prize guidelines or to register, please visit xprize.org/carbonremoval.

About XPRIZE

XPRIZE is a global future-positive movement of over 1M people and rising, delivering truly radical breakthroughs for the benefit of humanity. XPRIZE inspires and empowers a global community of problem-solvers to positively impact our world by crowdsourcing solutions through large-scale competitions, tackling the world’s grandest challenges in exploration, environment and human equity. Active competitions include the $100 Million XPRIZE Carbon Removal with Elon Musk, $15 Million XPRIZE Feed the Next Billion, $10 Million XPRIZE Rainforest, $10 Million ANA Avatar XPRIZE, $5 Million XPRIZE Rapid Reskilling and $1 Million Digital Learning Challenge. Donate, sign up or join a team at xprize.org.

About The Musk Foundation

The Musk Foundation creates grants made in support of: renewable energy research and advocacy; human space exploration research and advocacy; pediatric research; science and engineering education; and development of safe artificial intelligence to benefit humanity.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211110005384/en/

Contacts

Caden Kinard, 949-280-0182
caden.kinard@xprize.org


Using biochar to strengthen the removal of antibiotic resistance genes: Performance and mechanism

10 November, 2021
 

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Lottie Hawkins on Tackling Climate Change Through her Innovative Start-up Company …

10 November, 2021
 

Biochar is an organic material which carbonises under high temperatures when there is little to no oxygen present, is produced from waste wood and waste biomass, and can be used to improve soil and increase soil fertility. Biochar helps combat the strain on the environment by acting like a sponge, holding water and nutrients, reducing the need for fertiliser to be added to soil. 

Former Newcastle University student Lottie Hawkins set up an innovative start-up, Earthly Biochar, and the company is now the leading biochar start-up in the UK, developing the first biochar kiln on the market. By making one tonne of biochar, two and a half tonnes of CO2 is captured, preventing it from being released into the atmosphere. 

COP26 maybe drawing to a close, and having repeatedly hit the headlines with its dire warnings it has done much to highlight the plight of the planet, but Lottie is on her own mission to tackle the issue of excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere though the use of biochar. We caught up with her to find out more.

When did you first become interested in climate change? 

I studied the sciences at school and went to Newcastle University to study Molecular Biology. As part of my degree I was taught about climate change, ecology and conservation, but I didn’t really get into it until I worked for an Australian start-up called Koh who make very environmentally-focused cleaning products. It was really inspiring and a good lesson which taught me about the sustainability of different materials and the impact a business can have on the climate. It’s a classic, but the David Attenborough documentaries and following the news on climate change made a difference as well. Four years ago I went vegan because I learnt a lot about the impact eating meat and dairy has on the planet, so it was really a mixture of growing up in the countryside, being more educated, and being made aware of how lucky we are to have such beauty surrounding us. 

How did you learn about the power of biochar? 

I became interested in something called permaculture, which is when you grow food in very sustainable ways, and I went along to a society meeting at Bournemouth University and met a guy (Greg) who was studying biochar for his masters. He asked myself and my co-found Connor Lascelles if we had heard of biochar and if Connor, who was a product designer, could design a kiln for him. So it was from a spontaneous conversation really. 

What exactly is biochar? 

The easiest description is probably to say biochar is almost pure carbon which is resistant to degradation, which means that it can’t break down in the environment. When you actually make biochar, all the carbon that is left that would have gone into the atmosphere as CO2 has been captured. It’s therefore a form of carbon capture and we can put it in the soil to improve soil health. If you went to shop for it, it would probably be labelled under soil enhancers or amendments, but it’s also used in large projects – we’re doing a consultancy project where we’re planting carbon capture gardens with biochar.

Tell us more about the smokeless kiln you’ve built. 

It evolved from my co-founder Connor’s degree. We went away from the talk at Bournemouth University thinking how interesting this stuff sounded and were shocked we hadn’t heard of biochar before. There were loads of videos online of people who had tried to make their own kilns but there wasn’t anything commercial you could buy. Connor decided to make a working prototype for his final university project, and in August 2018 we formed Earthly Biochar. We now sell the smokeless kilns which are handmade in Wales to order, and because they’re smokeless they’re a really efficient and sustainable way of dealing with any waste wood – lot’s of people might put wood on a bonfire but they’re really smokey and what you get left with is a load of ash and carbon dioxide which goes up into the atmosphere. If you put your waste wood in our kiln you get left with biochar which can be used in your garden and you’ve captured the carbon as well, so it’s less polluting. 

What’s your goal for Earthly Biochar? 

Our primary goal is to fight climate change and to do that through biochar. In the next year we are bringing out three new products which will enter new markets. At the moment, biochar sits predominantly in the soil and gardening market, but we want to tap into a few new markets and increase the uptake of biochar in construction, fashion and the materials industry such as 3D printing. We’re developing those at the moment, but the big vision is to set up the first carbon negative biochar facility in the UK. We are working with Innovate UK, who have  already funded us, and we’re applying for more funding to actively facilitate that. I think one of the other aims is about raising awareness and understanding of biochar – it’s not well heard of outside very niche circles which means that’s it’s pretty slow to adopt. However, every gardener in the UK could be using biochar tomorrow if they knew about it and understood it, and that would make a huge difference to our carbon footprint as a country.

What are some tips you can give us about using biochar in our gardens? 

The simplest way to use biochar is to mix it into your compost bins – if you make compost at home you can mix your biochar in as you add food waste so it ends up being really evenly mixed. Alternately, you can buy store-bought compost and mix in the biochar. We also sell biochar with inoculant powder which you dilute in water and that’s full of nutrients and microbes which can be easier if you don’t have time for compost – you mix that with biochar and use it in your houseplants, veg beds and plant pots, and you only need a small amount. 

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Indo-Lankan webinar on production of nutrients- enriched biochar for organic agriculture

10 November, 2021
 

Colombo, November 10 (newsin.asia): The High Commission of India in Sri Lanka in association with the Sri Lanka Council for Agricultural Research Policy (SLCARP) organized a webinar on “Production of Nutrients Enriched Biochar for Organic Agriculture” by Dr. Manish Kumar, Principal Scientist, CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Material Technology, Bhubaneswar, India on 09 November 2021.

It was attended by about 70 participants including scientists, academics and policy makers of Sri Lanka where deliberations were held on conversion of bio wastes into Biochar for use in Organic Agriculture.

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Prof. Gamini Senanayake, Chairman, SLCARP in his introductory remark highlighted the importance of the webinar in the pretext of the decision of the Government of Sri Lanka to adopt organic agriculture practices.

In his brief remarks, Dr. Sushil Kumar, Head of Technical Cooperation in the High Commission highlighted that agriculture is a vital component of the multi-dimensional India – Sri Lanka partnership.

READ: Is India really ready for the next big outbreak?

Academic & research collaboration are being undertaken under the ‘Work Plan’ signed between the SLCARP and the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR).

Other prominent participants at the webinar included Dr Gamini Samarasinghe, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Agriculture, Dr Samanthi Wasala, Deputy Director General of Agriculture, Dr Deepani Alawathugoda, Additional Conservator of Forests and Amb. Sumith Nakandala, Former Additional Secretary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

END

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Biochar Market Size, Share & Trends Analysis Report By Types, Applications, Top Key … – LSMedia

11 November, 2021
 

Global Biochar Market report emphasizes on the detailed understanding of some decisive factors such as size, share, sales, forecast trends, supply, production, demands, industry and CAGR in order to provide a comprehensive outlook of the global market. Additionally, the report also highlights the challenges impeding market growth and expansion strategies employed by leading companies in the “Biochar Market”.

Global Biochar Market research report analyses top players in the key regions like North America, South America, Middle East and Africa, Asia and Pacific region. It delivers insight and expert analysis into key consumer trends and behaviour in market place, In addition to an overview of the market data and key brands. It also provides all data with easily digestible information to guide every businessman’s future innovation and move business ahead.

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By Top Key Players

Cool Planet Energy Systems
Tolero Energy
Agri-Tech Producers LLC
Biochar Supreme
Pacific Biochar
Avello Bioenergy
The Biochar Company
Full Circle Biochar
Vega Biofuels Inc.
Biochar Products
Diacarbon Energy Inc
Gree Charcoal International

By Types

Gasified Rice Hull Biochar (GRHB)
Sawdust Biochar (SDB)
Bark and Wood Biochar (BWB)

By Applications

Industrial Fuel
Soil Amendment
Carbon Black
Barbecuing
Decontamination
Livestock Production
Others

Geographically, the detailed analysis of consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate, historic and forecast (2015-2027) of the following regions: United States, Canada, Germany, UK, France, Italy, Spain, Russia, Netherlands, Turkey, Switzerland, Sweden, Poland, Belgium, China, Japan, South Korea, Australia, India, Taiwan, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Columbia, Chile, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria, South Africa and Rest of the World

Direct Purchase this Market Research Report Now @ https://crediblemarkets.com/reports/purchase/biochar-market-909481?license_type=single_user;utm_source=Sneha&utm_medium=SatPR

Some Points from TOC

Chapter 1 Market Overview

Chapter 2 Market Dynamics

Chapter 3 Associated Industry Assessment

Chapter 4 Market Competitive Landscape

Chapter 5 Analysis of Leading Companies

Chapter 6 Market Analysis and Forecast, By Product Types

Chapter 7 Market Analysis and Forecast, By Applications

Chapter 8 Market Analysis and Forecast, By Regions

Chapter 9 North America Biochar Market Analysis

Chapter 10 Europe Biochar Market Analysis

Chapter 11 Asia-Pacific Biochar Market Analysis

Chapter 12 South America Biochar Market Analysis

Chapter 13 Middle East and Africa Biochar Market Analysis

Chapter 14 Conclusions and Recommendations

Chapter 15 Appendix

Do You Have Any Query Or Specific Requirement? Ask to Our Industry Expert @ https://crediblemarkets.com/enquire-request/biochar-market-909481?utm_source=Sneha&utm_medium=SatPR

Do You Have Any Query Or Specific Requirement? Ask to Our Industry Expert @ https://crediblemarkets.com/enquire-request/biochar-market-909481?utm_source=Sneha&utm_medium=SatPR

Report includes Competitor's Landscape:

➊ Major trends and growth projections by region and country
➋ Key winning strategies followed by the competitors
➌ Who are the key competitors in this industry?
➍ What shall be the potential of this industry over the forecast tenure?
➎ What are the factors propelling the demand for the Biochar?
➏ What are the opportunities that shall aid in significant proliferation of the market growth?
➐ What are the regional and country wise regulations that shall either hamper or boost the demand for Biochar?
➑ How has the covid-19 impacted the growth of the market?
➒ Has the supply chain disruption caused changes in the entire value chain?

Customization of the Report:

This report can be customized to meet the client’s requirements. Please connect with our sales team ([email protected] ), who will ensure that you get a report that suits your needs. You can also get in touch with our executives on +1(929)-450-2887 to share your research requirements.

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