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The Summer Of Soil: Trattoria Stella Owner Launches New Vineyard Project On Old Mission

1 April, 2022
 

A new vineyard is coming to Old Mission Peninsula, but it won’t look quite like any other winery in northern Michigan. The brainchild of Amanda Danielson, owner and sommelier at Trattoria Stella, the project is one part training ground for the winemakers of tomorrow, one part lab for researching environmentally-friendly growing practices, and one part springboard toward a more prestigious future for northern Michigan wine.

Last September, Danielson purchased a 20-acre property on Old Mission Peninsula, located at 14695 Mapleton Lane. She plans to turn the parcel into a vineyard, but not one that would include either a tasting room or a production facility. Instead, Danielson will grow wine grapes, food crops, mushrooms, and flowers on the land, with plans to sell the yield to local wineries, restaurants, florists, and more. Her vision is to work with aspiring farmers or winemakers – including college students studying horticulture or viticulture, migrant workers, or younger farmers inheriting farmland from their parents – and provide a place where those individuals can learn farming techniques that are productive and profitable but also good for the environment.

Currently, Danielson is working with Michigan State University Extension and several other partners to devise strategies that will minimize carbon footprint and maximize land usage. Those ideas include everything from compost and biochar, to planting cover crops, to using non-plantable land for greenhouses or on-site employee housing.

Danielson will begin operations at the property later this year with what she is calling “the summer of soil,” which will involve digging “soil pits” at multiple points throughout the parcel. Soil health and composition, she explains, can have a huge impact on which types of wine grapes can grow, how healthy the fruit will be, and the quality of the wine produced from those grapes. By assessing soil as far down as eight feet, Danielson hopes to formulate a master plan that will “maximize the potential of the property from a commercial perspective while prioritizing the health of the land.”

In addition to soil testing, Danielson will use a variety of other background information – including “historic weather data, sun exposure, wind movement, [and] temperature at various points” – to inform her growing strategies.

“I want to use science to find the balance between what the land needs and what I want to grow,” Danielson tells The Ticker, adding that “grapes grown with the intention of producing truly world-class wine is a key focus,” but also acknowledging that not every part of the land is conducive to grapevines. Those remaining parts of the property will be used primarily for other crop types, which will in turn diversify the farm’s output, foster better soil health, and preclude the need for pesticides or herbicides.

“For me, it is only natural that I would plant every inch to something that serves the soil or the community,” Danielson continues. “The farm will be beautiful in its diversity, with sunflowers, border crops, and healthy trees providing a habitat for beneficial insects and animals while protecting the vines and vegetables from chemical drift from other farms.”

One key partner on the project is Dr. Paolo Sabbatini, a professor of viticulture at MSU and part of the MSU Extension program. According to Sabbatini, MSU sees this project as a way to help fill two of the major gaps in Michigan’s wine industry: research and education.

“[The northern Michigan wine industry] is very young,” Sabbatini explains. “The first wine grapes in Traverse City were planted at the end of the 1960s and beginning of the 1970s. So, we really only have 50 years of experience growing grapes in Traverse City, and that’s not much when you compare it to the story of other growing regions – thousands of years in Europe, and hundreds of years in California.”

Of particular interest to MSU, Sabbatini says, is the opportunity to research wine grafting. By now, he notes, northwest Michigan winegrowers have a good idea of which wine grapes grow best in the region’s climate and soils. “But we don’t know much of anything about the interaction of different cultivars with different rootstocks,” he says. “Grapevines can be grafted so they grow on roots that don’t belong to the same variety. Different kinds of rootstocks might be more drought-tolerant, or work better in sandy soils. This variability of rootstock behavior, in relation to different soil and different varieties, is still totally unknown in Michigan. We are going to start a project on [Danielson’s] property where part of the planting will be dedicated to understanding the interaction between different varieties in relation to different rootstocks.”

That approach, Sabbatini adds, may help “fine-tune” northern Michigan grape farming. Armed with more data, winegrowers could theoretically select specific grafts to achieve larger fruit yields, superior fruit quality, better growth in certain soil types, or crops less vulnerable to pests and disease.

Another key partner is Dave Bos, of the Elk Rapids-based winery BOS Wine. Bos was part of Danielson’s original restaurant staff when she opened Stella in 2004, but he moved to California shortly after to get a crash course in the world of wine. He ended up vineyard manager at Napa Valley’s Grgich Hills Estate, where he converted 367 acres to biodynamic and organic farming practices. Now back in northern Michigan, Bos says there is a definite move toward organic and environmentally-conscious farming among the region’s wineries.

“Biodynamics is really about focusing on the health, quality, and vitality inside the farm ecosystem,” Bos explains. “I think the wine industry is interested in that because, if you grow better grapes, you make better money. That’s not necessarily true in the dairy industry, or in most commodity crops. If you’re the best corn grower in Nebraska, you’re probably still getting the same price as the worst corn grower. But we can charge a premium [for better wine or better wine grapes].”

That’s the the other major goal of Danielson’s new farm: using better growing practices to grow better fruit, and in turn letting that shift kick off a domino effect that will (hopefully) lead to higher-quality Michigan wines, more profitable local wineries, and more features on wine lists in other parts of the world.

“World-class wine comes from honoring each point of the cycle from dirt to glass,” she says. “One of the opportunities I see is being able to increase what the producers are actually paid for their grapes per ton, just by farming better. There’s a huge demand right now – and not enough supply – for high-quality, well-farmed fruit. And already, we’re seeing a push for that type of fruit out there. Bryan Ulbrich at Left Foot Charley, for instance, is asking his growers to grow in this way, because it’s better: better fruit, better for the environment, better everything. So, you’re already seeing this trend out there; I just want to make it more complete.”

The City of Traverse City will begin its spring loose leaf and brush pick-up program on Monday, April 11. Pick-up will begin on the west side of …

Becky Tranchell, owner of the former neighborhood café Rose and Fern on Eighth Street, is launching a new venture this spring: a coffee and juice bar called …

If it wasn’t already the epicenter of tourism in Michigan, Traverse City will certainly step into the spotlight April 19-21, when it hosts the Pure Michigan Governor’s …

Cherryland Cares has awarded a total of $16,000 to three northwest Michigan area non-profit organizations. The Grand Traverse Dyslexia Association and Northwest Michigan Community Action Agency’s Northwest …


Biochar Consumption Market Size By Top Keyplayers 2022 -2030 – FortBendNow

1 April, 2022
 

New Jersey, USA,- Market Research Intellect released The latest research document on the Biochar Consumption Market 2022 examines market investment. Describes how companies that deploy these technologies across a variety of industries aim to explore the possibility of becoming major business vandals. Biochar Consumption research includes highly useful reviews and strategic assessments, including profiles and strategies of leading companies, as well as general market trends, emerging technologies, industry drivers, challenges, and regulatory policies driving market growth. To provide a more informed perspective, Biochar Consumption Research provides a snapshot of the current state of a rapidly changing industry, presenting a more robust approach from the perspective of both end users and service providers/players.

The XX% of the world market for Biochar Consumption in 2021, but it is expected to grow at a XX% CAGR in the period after Corona and reach US$XX million in 2029. On the other hand, the Electronics segment will grow at an average annual growth rate (CARG) XX% until 2029 and will occupy approximately a XX% share by 2029.

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Biochar-Based Compost Affects Bacterial Community Structure and Induces a Priming Effect …

1 April, 2022
 

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Shiu, J.-H.; Huang, Y.-C.; Lu, Z.-T.; Jien, S.-H.; Wu, M.-L.; Wu, Y.-T. Biochar-Based Compost Affects Bacterial Community Structure and Induces a Priming Effect on Soil Organic Carbon Mineralization. Processes 2022, 10, 682. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10040682

Shiu J-H, Huang Y-C, Lu Z-T, Jien S-H, Wu M-L, Wu Y-T. Biochar-Based Compost Affects Bacterial Community Structure and Induces a Priming Effect on Soil Organic Carbon Mineralization. Processes. 2022; 10(4):682. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10040682

Shiu, Jia-Ho, Yi-Chan Huang, Zi-Ting Lu, Shih-Hao Jien, Meng-Ling Wu, and Yu-Ting Wu. 2022. “Biochar-Based Compost Affects Bacterial Community Structure and Induces a Priming Effect on Soil Organic Carbon Mineralization” Processes 10, no. 4: 682. https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10040682

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Bucket of Biochar– 18L made with love – BidBud

1 April, 2022
 

Hand made with love in West Auckland from all natural materials. Made by Char Bro Ltd for you and your whanau <3

Biochar
Add biochar to your garden beds for beautiful, lush growth and juicy harvests with less effort.

Acts like a biological accelerator for your plants, worm farm and compost.

Works like a sponge around plants, helping ensure optimum moisture levels and increasing fertility by keeping soil nutrients where they are needed – right next to the roots.

Add biochar into your compost and reduce turning, speed up maturation and produce lovely, fluffy, rich soil for next season's bounty.

Once you've reached the desired ratio of biochar in the soil, you're done. No reapplication required – your back will love you for it. Char Bro – it's There for Good.

Coverage
Covers at least 3.6 square metres of garden (when mixed in at 10% into the top 5cm of the soil). For better results, you can mix it in even deeper. We are also happy to also give advice on ways to make it go even further

What's in it?
– Made from Tasmanian Blackwood, Kanuka, Manuka, Pine and Poplar.
– It would probably pass organic cert, but we haven't gone down that path yet.
– There's a very small proportion of ash and a few partially charred twigs here and there, but it's at least 95%+ great quality char.

You need to log in to your Trade Me account to continue.

Simply log in, click “allow”, and you’ll be returned here to complete your purchase.


Nonprofit group targets water quality in Catherine and Channel lakes – Daily Herald

1 April, 2022
 

A determined group of residents near Antioch plans to employ a new tactic to improve the quality in two connected lakes.

Friends of Catherine and Channel Lakes, a nonprofit organization established in 2016, has a detailed lake management plan to reduce pollution and eradicate invasive species in two of Illinois’ northernmost lakes.


Biomass Cycling Workshop in Leggett Sunday – Redheaded Blackbelt

1 April, 2022
 

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Zurich brings net-zero target forward 20 years to 2030 – edie

1 April, 2022
 

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Zurich has announced that it has moved its net-zero target for 2050 forward by two decades to 2030. Under the original target, which was announced last year, Zurich was targeting a 25% cut in carbon intensity for listed equity and corporate bond investments by 2025 and emissions from operations to be reduced by 70% by 2029.

The insurance firm has now announced a revised end goal to reach net-zero by 2030. Over the next eight years, the company will run as carbon neutral across its operations and is now increasing the proportion of carbon removal offsets it will use, although the exact amount is yet to be specified.

Now, Zurich will aim to have 75% of its management procurement spend with suppliers that have their own science-based and net-zero targets for 2030.

“Since we first started measuring our carbon footprint in 2007, we have avoided an estimated one million metric tons of CO2-equivalent emissions, and our focus remains on reducing them to a minimum,” Zurich’s EMEA chief executive Alison Martin said.

“To balance out our unavoidable residual emissions, we are supporting innovative carbon removal solutions. The urgency of the situation means we need to be proactive and help scale up the carbon removal industry, which is still in its infancy.”

Additionally, Zurich has signed new carbon removal agreements with InterEarth, which removed CO2 using “woody biomass burial”, Bio Restorative Ideas, which plans to convert waste and invasive bamboo to biochar on the site of a former sugar cane factory in the southwest of Puerto Rico and Oregon Biochar Solutions, which produces biochar from forestry waste.

While nature-based solutions are the company’s initial focus, Zurich is also exploring technological solutions such as direct air capture and storage.

Net-Zero Insurance Alliance

Last year, Zurich was one of the investors who helped launch the Net-Zero Insurance Alliance, of which members will be required to deliver net-zero emissions by 2050 across their insurance and reinsurance portfolios.

In a Statement of Commitment for the Alliance, they have signalled their intention to go beyond these in-house goals and to advocate for national policies that would enable a “socially just transition of economic sectors to net-zero”.

There is also an overarching commitment for insurers to take heed of the roadmap to net-zero by 2050 published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) this year. That roadmap states that investment for new coal plants without measures to abate emissions and future fossil fuel supply projects – especially more aggressive projects such as tar sands and arctic drilling – should be halted immediately. It also states that no new petrol or diesel cars should be sold after 2035.

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Zurich brings net-zero target forward 20 years to 2030

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Industry Insights, Drivers, Top Trends, Global Analysis, Forecast and Opportunities to 2028

1 April, 2022
 

Biochar is one of the types of charcoal that is used as a soil amendment for both soil health benefits and carbon sequestration. Biochar such as woody biomass, agricultural waste, animal manure can enhance soil fertility of acidic soils (low pH soils), improve agricultural productivity, and render protection against some foliar and soil-borne diseases. Biochar primarily finds application in electricity generation, agriculture and farming,and forestry.

Biochar Market study by “The Insight Partners” provides details about the market dynamics affecting the market, Market scope, Market segmentation and overlays shadow upon the leading market players highlighting the favorable competitive landscape and trends prevailing over the years. The report profiles the key players in the industry, along with a detailed analysis of their individual positions against the global landscape. The study conducts SWOT analysis to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the key players in the Biochar Market.

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The study assesses factors such as segmentation, description, and applications of Plastic-to-fuel industries. It derives accurate insights to give a holistic view of the dynamic features of the business, including shares, profit generation, thereby directing focus on the critical aspects of the business.

The final report will add the analysis of the Impact of Covid-19 in this report Biochar Market.

Adapting to the recent novel COVID-19 pandemic, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the global Biochar Market is included in the present report. The influence of the novel coronavirus pandemic on the growth of the Biochar Market is analyzed and depicted in the report.

Some of the companies competing in the Biochar Market are:

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Biochar Market Segmented by Region/Country:

Drivers & Constraints

The Biochar Market rests united with the incidence of leading players who keep funding to the market’s growth significantly every year. The report studies the value, volume trends, and the pricing structure of the market so that it could predict maximum growth in the future. Besides, various suppressed growth factors, restraints, and opportunities are also estimated for the advanced study and suggestions of the market over the assessment period.

Chapter Details of Biochar Market:
Part 01: Executive Summary
Part 02: Scope of Biochar Market Report
Part 03: Biochar Market Landscape
Part 04: Biochar Market Sizing
Part 05: Biochar Market Value
Part 06: Five Forces Analysis
Part 07: Customer Landscape
Part 08: Geographic Landscape
Part 09: Decision Framework
Part 10: Drivers and Challenges
Part 11: Market Trends
Part 12: Vendor Landscape
Part 13: Vendor Analysis

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Butte County opens door for land use options at landfill – Chico Enterprise-Record

1 April, 2022
 

The front of the Neal Road Recycling and Waste Management Facility as seen Friday, Dec. 10, 2021 in Butte County, California. (Jake Hutchison/Enterprise-Record)

DURHAM — Now that the county owns considerably more land surrounding the Neal Road Recycling and Waste Facility, options for expansion, or even sharing with a private entity, have increased.

At its last meeting, the Butte County Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a broadened Request for Proposal to gather some ideas as well as hear from private companies that may be interested in land partnerships, which would mean an opportunity to lease some of the land to companies interested in providing biomass or biochar services.

Deputy Administrative Officer Katie Simmons said biomass can come with additional red tape. A feasibility study is underway with funding from the Cal Fire Forest Health Grant to determine whether or not a hydrogen biomass feedstock facility would suit Butte County.

“The study is due to be complete in early 2023 and it will help us understand the impact of similar hydrogen biomass facilities in rural, forested and agricultural communities,” Simmons said. “It will help us synthesize available data on our ability to procure feedstock over the long term to support these biomass facilities and to assess any major policy and funding that might be related to operating biomass facilities and generating these feedstock agreements over time.”

Feedstock refers to raw materials such as crude oil used in manufacturing and other processes.

Deciding what to do with the land will be a process on its own, separate from the facility’s master plan which is still in the works, said Public Works Director Joshua Pack.

“Earlier this year, the board did approve a contract to create a comprehensive master planning process out at the landfill,” Pack said. “That kick-off meeting recently occurred and over the next month or two, various studies are set to begin so we can use that information to populate and create the draft master plan.”

Pack said the master plan has a much larger scope than just looking at biomass options.

When looking at processing biomass, Pack listed some of the benefits of property development such as additional reductions in fire fuels as well as potential economic benefits for the Neal Road facility. On top of that, it could help the landfill in both extending its life and helping it comply with Senate Bill 1383 which brought more guidelines to local waste facilities.

Pack had provided the option of a request for information to the board at a previous meeting which would allow for the county to ask for advice from the private sector on ways it could go forward.

In regards to working with private companies, Pack said a precedent has already been set to a degree as the facility previously entered into a contract with Ameresco in 2008 to aid in renewable energy and remove some landfill gases.

Pack said this came from a similar process to what the board decided on in putting out a broad request for proposal. In 2007, the board looked over nine proposals and began scheduling interviews before eventually narrowing it down to Ameresco.

One company has already reached out to the county regarding the waste facility, but a request for proposal was needed in order to set up an informational presentation with the board.

Supervisor Debra Lucero said one thing she would like to see potentially discussed is biochar, which refers to material rich in carbon that is typically created through biomass and food waste.

“From my perspective, my office has been working with the whole food system chain, so composting would be a great part of that as well,” Lucero said. “I’m glad we’re thinking outside the box, or in this instance the waste bin.”

The April snowpack, key to how much water flows into reservoirs, is 38% of average statewide, proving that drought hasn’t relaxed its grip on California.Chico has a bit of a reputation for partying, particularly on Cesar Chavez Day. Local weaver and Chico Flax co-founder Sandy Fisher has been accepted into the Smithsonian Craft Show taking place April 20 at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. for her woven crafts using flax linen, a material that she has been experimenting with since 2012.

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How to Create Soil That Lasts – Enchanted Gardens

1 April, 2022
 

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Zurich Insurance Accelerates Operational Net-Zero Target to 2030 Instead of 2050

1 April, 2022
 

Zurich Insurance Group announced it is bringing forward by 20 years its target to achieve net-zero emissions in its operations.

It now aims to reach the goal by 2030, after implementing plans announced on March 31 last year to achieve cuts in absolute emissions this decade. After that, emissions that cannot be avoided will be removed from the atmosphere.

Marsh McLennan Commits to Net-Zero Across Operations by 2050

In November 2021, Zurich also announced it will no longer underwrite new greenfield oil exploration projects. It also committed to a full phase-out of thermal coal from its underwriting portfolio in wealthy countries by 2030 and by 2040 for the rest of the world, unless companies seeking cover had formally approved science-based targets in place.

For its operational net-zero goals rolled out this week, Zurich said it has signed carbon removal agreements with several suppliers of nature-based solutions, where it can have the biggest impact on the development of the carbon removal industry.

The company said it has made advance payments to help these suppliers further develop, scale and commercialize their early stage and innovative technologies.

The projects were also selected to align with Zurich’s broader sustainability goals, including flood resilience, wildfire prevention and developing a fairer society through support for good quality jobs in sustainable industries.

“Since we first started measuring our carbon footprint in 2007, we have avoided an estimated 1 million metric tons of CO2-equivalent emissions, and our focus remains on reducing them to a minimum,” said Alison Martin, CEO EMEA and Bank Distribution, and the executive committee member responsible for Sustainability, in a statement.

To handle its unavoidable residual emissions, Martin said, Zurich is supporting innovative carbon removal solutions. “The urgency of the situation means we need to be proactive and help scale up the carbon removal industry, which is still in its infancy.”

Carbon Removal Suppliers

The chosen carbon removal suppliers are InterEarth from Australia, Bio Restorative Ideas from Puerto Rico and Oregon Biochar Solutions from the United States. Zurich said its participation in these projects, facilitated through carbon removal marketplace Puro.earth, is instrumental for the projects to start and expand their operations.

The InterEarth project removes CO2 with an innovative method called woody biomass burial, explained Zurich, noting that the company grows a selection of highly adapted woody plants on degraded, low rainfall, and previously cleared farmland in Australia.

Periodically, the plants are trimmed of their above-ground biomass and the harvested biomass is buried and encapsulated in dedicated subterranean chambers. The aim, said Zurich, is to permanently store the carbon captured within the biomass.

Bio Restorative Ideas plans to convert waste and invasive bamboo to high-quality biochar on the site of a former sugar cane factory in the southwest of Puerto Rico, which will be used to improve soils with cascading benefits in food production and yield. Other applications, such as an additive to concrete or building materials, are also under consideration.

Zurich explained that bamboo is a rapidly growing grass and when fallen and broken, particularly along waterways, can cause blockages, flooding and erosion. By collecting and converting it into biochar, the project also helps to prevent these negative effects.

Oregon Biochar Solutions produces high-quality biochar, mainly sourced from forestry waste, including fire hazard biomass and wood burned in forest fires. By removing this latter material, the risk of future fires is reduced while putting waste material to a productive use, said Zurich. This U.S.-based company is already producing biochar, most of which is sold to farms, and has capacity to scale up to produce more than 3,000 metric tons per year. It uses the revenue derived from the sale of carbon removal certificates to pass cost savings on to local farmers and entrepreneurs looking to integrate clean products in their supply chain.

Zurich said it is committed to act now to remove carbon from the atmosphere and will continue to look for and support additional solutions to diversify its carbon removal approach. After initially focusing on biomass-based carbon removal, Zurich is now also looking at technological solutions such as direct air capture and storage.

To complement its net-zero strategy, Zurich aims to have 75% of its managed procurement spend with suppliers that have science-based emissions reduction targets by 2025 and net-zero targets by 2030.

Until 2030, the group will maintain overall carbon neutrality in its operations, steadily increasing the proportion of its carbon removal offsets that qualify for net-zero certification.

Source: Zurich Insurance

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Biochar Market Size and Share – 2028 | Industry Analysis by TIP – The Insight Partners

1 April, 2022
 

1.1 Study Scope

1.2 The Insight Partners Research Report Guidance

1.3 Market Segmentation

3.1 Scope of the Study

3.2 Research Methodology

3.2.1 Data Collection

3.2.2 Primary Interviews

3.2.3 Hypothesis Formulation

3.2.4 Macro-economic Factor Analysis

3.2.5 Developing Base Number

3.2.6 Data Triangulation

3.2.7 Country Level Data

4.1 Market Overview

4.3 Porter’s Five Forces Analysis

4.4 Ecosystem Analysis

4.5 Expert Opinion

5.1 Market Drivers

5.1.1 Growing demand for biochar in agriculture & feedstock industry.

5.1.2 Advanced benefits of Biochar.

5.2 Market Restraints

5.2.1 Limited adoption by farmers in agro-based economies.

5.2.2 High transportation cost of raw material and the possibility of contamination

5.3 Market Opportunities

5.3.1 Increasing demand for organic food products.

5.3.2 Increasing prevalence of biochar in water treatment.

5.3.3 Biochar applications in the construction industry

5.4 Future Trends

5.4.1 Growing adoption of biochar for energy production.

5.5 Impact Analysis of Drivers and Restraints

6.1 Biochar Market Overview

6.2 Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028

6.3 Biochar Market –Volume and Forecast to 2028

6.4 Competitive Positioning – Key Market Players

7.1 Overview

7.2 Biochar Market, By Feedstock (2020 and 2028)

7.3 Woody Biomass and Agricultural Waste

7.3.1 Overview

7.3.2 Woody Biomass and Agricultural Waste: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

7.3.3 Woody Biomass and Agricultural Waste: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

7.4 Animal Manure

7.4.1 Overview

7.4.2 Animal Manure: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

7.4.3 Animal Manure: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

7.5 Others

7.5.1 Overview

7.5.2 Others: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

7.5.3 Others: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

8.1 Overview

8.2 Biochar Market, By Application (2020 and 2028)

8.3 Electricity Generation

8.3.1 Overview

8.3.2 Electricity Generation: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

8.3.3 Electricity Generation: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

8.4 Agriculture

8.4.1 Overview

8.4.2 Agriculture: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

8.4.3 Agriculture: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

8.5 Forestry

8.5.1 Overview

8.5.2 Forestry: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

8.5.3 Forestry: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

8.6 Others

8.6.1 Overview

8.6.2 Others: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

8.6.3 Others: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

9.1 Overview

9.3 North America: Biochar Market

9.3.1 North America: Biochar Market , by Feedstock

9.3.2 North America: Biochar Market , by Application

9.3.3 North America: Biochar Market , by Key Country

9.3.3.1 US: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.3.3.1.1 US Biochar Market, by Feedstock

9.3.3.1.2 US: Biochar Market , by Application

9.3.3.2 Canada: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.3.3.2.1 Canada: Biochar Market, by Feedstock

9.3.3.2.2 Canada: Biochar Market, by Application

9.3.3.3 Mexico: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.3.3.3.1 Mexico: Biochar Market, by Feedstock

9.3.3.3.2 Mexico: Biochar Market, by Application

9.4 Europe: Biochar Market

9.4.1 Europe: Biochar Market –Revenue an Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.4.2 Europe: Biochar Market, By Feedstock

9.4.3 Europe: Biochar Market, by Application

9.4.4 Europe: Biochar Market, by Key Country

9.4.4.1 Germany: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.4.4.1.1 Germany: Biochar Market, By Feedstock

9.4.4.1.2 Germany: Biochar Market, by Application

9.4.4.2 France: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.4.4.2.1 France: Biochar Market, By Feedstock

9.4.4.2.2 France: Biochar Market, by Application

9.4.4.3 Italy: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.4.4.3.1 Italy: Biochar Market, By Feedstock

9.4.4.3.2 Italy: Biochar Market, by Application

9.4.4.4 United Kingdom: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.4.4.4.1 United Kingdom: Biochar Market, By Feedstock

9.4.4.4.2 United Kingdom: Biochar Market, by Application

9.4.4.5 Russia: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.4.4.5.1 Russia: : Biochar Market, By Feedstock

9.4.4.5.2 Russia: : Biochar Market, by Application

9.4.4.6 Rest of Europe: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.4.4.6.1 Rest of Europe: Biochar Market , By Feedstock

9.4.4.6.2 Rest of Europe: Biochar Market , by Application

9.5 Asia Pacific: Biochar Market

9.5.1 Asia Pacific: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.5.2 Asia Pacific: Biochar Market , By Feedstock

9.5.3 Asia Pacific: Biochar Market , by Application

9.5.4 Asia Pacific: Biochar Market , by Key Country

9.5.4.1 Australia: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.5.4.1.1 Australia: Biochar Market , By Feedstock

9.5.4.1.2 Australia: Biochar Market, by Application

9.5.4.2 China: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.5.4.2.1 China: Biochar Market , By Feedstock

9.5.4.2.2 China: Biochar Market , by Application

9.5.4.3 India: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.5.4.3.1 India: Biochar Market , By Feedstock

9.5.4.3.2 India: Biochar Market , by Application

9.5.4.4 Japan: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.5.4.4.1 Japan: Biochar Market , By Feedstock

9.5.4.4.2 Japan: Biochar Market , by Application

9.5.4.5 South Korea: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.5.4.5.1 South Korea: Biochar Market , By Feedstock

9.5.4.5.2 South Korea: Biochar Market , by Application

9.5.4.6 Rest of Asia Pacific: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.5.4.6.1 Rest of Asia Pacific: Biochar Market , By Feedstock

9.5.4.6.2 Rest of Asia Pacific: Biochar Market , by Application

9.6 Middle East and Africa: Biochar Market

9.6.1 Middle East and Africa: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.6.2 Middle East and Africa: Biochar Market , by Feedstock

9.6.3 Middle East and Africa: Biochar Market , by Application

9.6.4 Middle East and Africa: Biochar Market , by Key Country

9.6.4.1 South Africa: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.6.4.1.1 South Africa: Biochar Market , by Feedstock

9.6.4.1.2 South Africa: Biochar Market , by Application

9.6.4.2 Saudi Arabia: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.6.4.2.1 Saudi Arabia: Biochar Market , by Feedstock

9.6.4.2.2 Saudi Arabia: Biochar Market , by Application

9.6.4.3 UAE: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.6.4.3.1 UAE: Biochar Market , by Feedstock

9.6.4.3.2 UAE: Biochar Market , by Application

9.6.4.4 Rest of MEA: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.6.4.4.1 Rest of MEA: Biochar Market , by Feedstock

9.6.4.4.2 Rest of MEA: Biochar Market , by Application

9.7.1 South America: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.7.2 South America: Biochar Market , by Feedstock

9.7.3 South America: Biochar Market , by Application

9.7.4 South America: Biochar Market , by Key Country

9.7.4.1 Brazil: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.7.4.1.1 Brazil: Biochar Market , by Feedstock

9.7.4.1.2 Brazil: Biochar Market , by Application

9.7.4.2 Argentina: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.7.4.2.1 Argentina: Biochar Market , by Feedstock

9.7.4.2.2 Argentina: Biochar Market , by Application

9.7.4.3 Rest of South America: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

9.7.4.3.1 Rest of South America: Biochar Market , by Feedstock

9.7.4.3.2 Rest of South America: Biochar Market , by Application

10.1 Airex Énergie Inc.

10.1.1 Key Facts

10.1.2 Business Description

10.1.3 Products and Services

10.1.4 Financial Overview

10.1.5 SWOT Analysis

10.1.6 Key Developments

10.2 Genesis Industries

10.2.1 Key Facts

10.2.2 Business Description

10.2.3 Products and Services

10.2.4 Financial Overview

10.2.5 SWOT Analysis

10.2.6 Key Developments

10.3 Carbon Gold Ltd

10.3.1 Key Facts

10.3.2 Business Description

10.3.3 Products and Services

10.3.4 Financial Overview

10.3.5 SWOT Analysis

10.3.6 Key Developments

10.4 Black Owl Biochar

10.4.1 Key Facts

10.4.2 Business Description

10.4.3 Products and Services

10.4.4 Financial Overview

10.4.5 SWOT Analysis

10.4.6 Key Developments

10.5 Biochar Now, LLC

10.5.1 Key Facts

10.5.2 Business Description

10.5.3 Products and Services

10.5.4 Financial Overview

10.5.5 SWOT Analysis

10.5.6 Key Developments

10.6 Phoenix Energy

10.6.1 Key Facts

10.6.2 Business Description

10.6.3 Products and Services

10.6.4 Financial Overview

10.6.5 SWOT Analysis

10.6.6 Key Developments

10.7 American BioChar Company

10.7.1 Key Facts

10.7.2 Business Description

10.7.3 Products and Services

10.7.4 Financial Overview

10.7.5 SWOT Analysis

10.7.6 Key Developments

10.8 BioForceTech Corporation

10.8.1 Key Facts

10.8.2 Business Description

10.8.3 Products and Services

10.8.4 Financial Overview

10.8.5 SWOT Analysis

10.8.6 Key Developments

10.9 Ecoera

10.9.1 Key Facts

10.9.2 Business Description

10.9.3 Products and Services

10.9.4 Financial Overview

10.9.5 SWOT Analysis

10.9.6 Key Developments

10.10 Pyropower

10.10.1 Key Facts

10.10.2 Business Description

10.10.3 Products and Services

10.10.4 Financial Overview

10.10.5 SWOT Analysis

10.10.6 Key Developments

11.1 About The Insight Partners

11.2 Word Index

Table 1. Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Table 2. Biochar Market –Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 3. Global Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Table 4. Global Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 5. Global Biochar Market, by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Table 6. Global Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 7. North America Biochar Market , by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 8. North America Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 9. North America Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 10. North America Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 11. US Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 12. US Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 13. US Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 14. US Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 15. Canada: Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 16. Canada Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 17. Canada Biochar Market, by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 18. Canada Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 19. Mexico Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 20. Mexico Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 21. Mexico Biochar Market, by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 22. Mexico Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 23. Europe Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 24. Europe Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 25. Europe Biochar Market, by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 26. Europe Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 27. Germany Biochar Market, By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 28. Germany Biochar Market, By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 29. Germany Biochar Market, by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 30. Germany Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 31. France Biochar Market, By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 32. France Biochar Market, By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 33. France Biochar Market, by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 34. France Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 35. Italy Biochar Market, By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 36. Italy Biochar Market, By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 37. Italy Biochar Market, by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 38. Italy Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 39. United Kingdom Biochar Market, By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 40. United Kingdom Biochar Market, By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 41. United Kingdom Biochar Market, by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 42. United Kingdom Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 43. Russia : Biochar Market, By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 44. Russia : Biochar Market, By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 45. Russia : Biochar Market, by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 46. Russia : Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 47. Rest of Europe Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 48. Rest of Europe Biochar Market , by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 49. Rest of Europe Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 50. Asia Pacific Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 51. Asia Pacific Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 52. Asia Pacific Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 53. Asia Pacific Biochar Market , by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 54. Australia Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 55. Australia Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 56. Australia Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 57. Australia Biochar Market , by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 58. China Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 59. China Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 60. China Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 61. China Biochar Market , by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 62. India Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 63. India Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 64. India Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 65. India Biochar Market , by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 66. Japan Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 67. Japan Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 68. Japan Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 69. Japan Biochar Market , by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 70. South Korea Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 71. South Korea Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 72. South Korea Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 73. South Korea Biochar Market , by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 74. Rest of Asia Pacific Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 75. Rest of Asia Pacific Biochar Market , By Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 76. Rest of Asia Pacific Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 77. Rest of Asia Pacific Biochar Market , by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 78. Middle East and Africa Biochar Market , by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 79. Middle East and Africa Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 80. Middle East and Africa Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 81. Middle East and Africa Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 82. South Africa Biochar Market , by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 83. South Africa Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 84. South Africa Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 85. South Africa Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 86. Saudi Arabia Biochar Market , by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 87. Saudi Arabia Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 88. Saudi Arabia Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 89. UAE Biochar Market , by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 90. UAE Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 91. UAE Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 92. UAE Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 93. Rest of MEA Biochar Market , by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 94. Rest of Middle East and Africa Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 95. Rest of MEA Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 96. Rest of Middle East and Africa Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 97. South America Biochar Market , by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 98. South America Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 99. South and Central America Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 100. Brazil Biochar Market , by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 101. Brazil Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 102. Brazil Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 103. Brazil Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 104. Argentina Biochar Market , by Feedstock – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 105. Argentina Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 106. Argentina Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 107. Argentina Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 108. Rest of South America Biochar Market , by Feedstock– Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 109. Rest of South and Central America Biochar Market, by Feedstock – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 110. Rest of South America Biochar Market , by Application – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (USD Million)

Table 111. Rest of South and Central America Biochar Market, by Application – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Table 112. List of Abbreviation

Figure 1. Global Biochar Market Segmentation

Figure 2. Biochar Market Segmentation – By Geography

Figure 3. Global Biochar Market Overview

Figure 4. Biochar Market, By Feedstock

Figure 5. Biochar Market, By Geography

Figure 6. Global Biochar Market, Industry Landscape

Figure 7. Porter’s Five Forces Analysis

Figure 8. Ecosystem: Biochar Market

Figure 9. Expert Opinion

Figure 10. Global Biochar Market Impact Analysis of Drivers and Restraints

Figure 11. Geographic Overview of Biochar Market

Figure 12. Global: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 13. Global: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast to 2028 (Tons)

Figure 14. Biochar Market Revenue Share, By Feedstock (2020 and 2028)

Figure 15. Woody Biomass and Agricultural Waste: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast To 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 16. Woody Biomass and Agricultural Waste: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast To 2028 (Tons)

Figure 17. Animal Manure: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast To 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 18. Animal Manure: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast To 2028 (Tons)

Figure 19. Others: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast To 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 20. Others: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast To 2028 (Tons)

Figure 21. Biochar Market Revenue Share, By Application (2020 and 2028)

Figure 22. Electricity Generation: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast To 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 23. Electricity Generation: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast To 2028 (Tons)

Figure 24. Agriculture: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast To 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 25. Agriculture: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast To 2028 (Tons)

Figure 26. Forestry: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast To 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 27. Forestry: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast To 2028 (Tons)

Figure 28. Others: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast To 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 29. Others: Biochar Market – Volume and Forecast To 2028 (Tons)

Figure 30. Global Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Region (2020 and 2028)

Figure 31. North America: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 32. North America: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Feedstock (2020 and 2028)

Figure 33. North America: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Application (2020 and 2028)

Figure 34. North America: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Key Country (2020 and 2028)

Figure 35. US: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 36. Canada: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 37. Mexico: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 38. Europe: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 39. Europe: Biochar Market Revenue Share, By Feedstock (2020 and 2028)

Figure 40. Europe: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Application (2020 and 2028)

Figure 41. Europe: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Key Country (2020 and 2028)

Figure 42. Germany: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 43. France: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 44. Italy: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 45. United Kingdom: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 46. Russia: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 47. Rest of Europe: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 48. Asia Pacific: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 49. Asia Pacific: Biochar Market Revenue Share, By Feedstock (2020 and 2028)

Figure 50. Asia Pacific: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Application (2020 and 2028)

Figure 51. Asia Pacific: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Key Country (2020 and 2028)

Figure 52. Australia: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 53. China: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 54. India: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 55. Japan: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 56. South Korea: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 57. Rest of Asia Pacific: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 58. Middle East and Africa: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 59. Middle East and Africa: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Feedstock (2020 and 2028)

Figure 60. Middle East and Africa: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Application (2020 and 2028)

Figure 61. Middle East and Africa: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Key Country (2020 and 2028)

Figure 62. South Africa: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 63. Saudi Arabia: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 64. UAE: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 65. Rest of MEA: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 66. South America: Biochar Market – Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 67. South America: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Feedstock (2020 and 2028)

Figure 68. South America: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Application (2020 and 2028)

Figure 69. South America: Biochar Market Revenue Share, by Key Country (2020 and 2028)

Figure 70. Brazil: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 71. Argentina: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)

Figure 72. Rest of South America: Biochar Market –Revenue and Forecast to 2028 (US$ Million)


3 things learned from Microsoft's carbon removal report | Greenbiz

1 April, 2022
 

Microsoft’s carbon removal purchasing report offers insights to other corporate buyers. Image via Shutterstock/Volodymyr Kyrylyuk

Microsoft is one of those companies we write about a lot at GreenBiz, as it has often been at the forefront of sustainability. While other organizations are focused primarily on getting to carbon neutral for current emissions, Microsoft plans to offset its entire historical emissions going back to when the company was founded in 1975.

The software powerhouse has certainly been busy. Early this year, it launched the Carbon Call, a collaboration with the ClimateWorks Foundation to develop reliable and accurate carbon accounting tools for companies and states tracking their carbon emissions. Microsoft is also building a cloud tool for managing and tracking sustainability metrics like emissions, sourcing suppliers and waste. Its quest to go carbon negative in the next 10 years also inspired a $1 billion fund for carbon reduction, capture and removal technologies.

Microsoft’s newest carbon removal report, issued in March, offers a deeper glimpse into its efforts to go net zero by 2030, a goal many other companies are reaching for over the next decade. It’s the third such update detailing its carbon removal efforts; in 2021, Microsoft published reflections on its 2020 work and in early March, it published a similar analysis for 2021. 

Among the core details in the latest report: In 2020, the company invested in projects driving 1.4 million metric tons of CO2 removal, equivalent to emissions from 301,657 cars driven for one year, according to the EPA calculator. In 2021, Microsoft bumped its purchases up to 1.5 million metric tons and collected carbon emissions data from 87 percent of its suppliers.

But while the company’s Scope 1 and 2 emissions decreased by 17 percent, Scope 3 stubbornly rose 23 percent year over year. According to Microsoft, most of that increase came from Xbox business growth and a rise in demand for cloud services such as Microsoft Office, which lead to an expanding global datacenter footprint. To combat this in the future, Microsoft is increasing the fee it charges business units for business travel to $100 per metric ton of CO2, adapting the way it sets carbon emission reduction targets, increasing the frequency of internal reporting and raising its internal carbon price.

Here are three things we learned from Microsoft’s latest carbon removal report:

Microsoft reported that it received 17 percent fewer applications and 43 percent fewer proposals for third-party carbon removal projects in response to its request for proposals (RFPs) in 2022 compared to 2021. In 2022, Microsoft received 67 applicants with about 106 projects in 35 countries.

According to the report, Microsoft believes “the lower response rate reflects our clearer criteria this year, greater supplier awareness of the distinction between carbon removal and carbon avoidance (despite the lack of common standards) and high demand for projects.”

Before the RFP, Microsoft released a criteria for removal projects with Carbon Direct, a carbon asset manager that also works with Shopify. The criteria outlined more specifically that Microsoft was looking for proposals from projects that would directly remove carbon from the atmosphere rather than avoided emission projects (such as protecting an already standing forest). According to Elizabeth Willmott, carbon program manager at Microsoft, by doing this the company got less proposals this year for projects that weren’t carbon removals and cut down on the amount of vetting her team had to do to find the right projects to invest in. 

Durability or permanence, meaning how long the carbon can be estimated to be stored, is a key factor for carbon offsets. Microsoft’s portfolio is a mix of high, low and medium durability projects. High durability projects, such as direct air capture, are estimated to store carbon for over 10,000 years, while low durability, nature-based ones such as planting a forest or mangrove, rarely get estimated to last above 100 years. Microsoft just identified six biochar projects for its medium-durability term solution, which it estimates will sequester carbon for between 200 and 1,000 years.

Biochar is charcoal made from biomass, decomposing agriculture or forestry waste in an environment without oxygen, that can be used to sequester carbon in the soil while also increasing the health of those soils.

The biochar projects backed by Microsoft include Puro.earth, Carbonfuture, Climate Robotics, Carbofex, ECHO2 and Carbon Cycle. The projects span from Oregon, Texas and California to Finland, Australia and Germany. The largest contracted volume for removal is 6,926 metric tons from the Freres Biochar project, which generates steam for lumber production using a biomass boiler with lumber scraps and local waste used as feedstocks. The biochar is created as a byproduct of this process. The other projects hover around the level of 1,000 metric tons of removal and use feedstocks such as bark, food waste, spruce thinnings and wood chips.

“It’s what was available in terms of medium durability solutions that were relatively affordable and in supply on the market,” Willmot said. “It is being newly embraced as a true carbon removal solution at scale.”

Other corporate leaders in carbon removals, such as Shopify, have also started to invest in biochar solutions.

For high durability solutions, the common one that has been in direct air capture (DAC), where machines pull carbon directly out of the air for sequestration. Legacy players, such as Climeworks and Carbon Engineering, which have both been around since 2009 and have over $100 million in funding each, are working with Shopify, Stripe and Microsoft.

However this year, Microsoft has diversified its high durability, “holy grail” carbon removal solutions. The software giant is working with two early-stage companies that supply long-term solutions, Charm Industrial and Neustark, which the Department of Energy’s Carbon Direct Removal database categorizes as biomass injection technology and mineralization, respectively. 

Charm Industrial injects a bio-oil created from plant and crop biomass that contains atmospheric carbon deep into the earth. Neustark sequesters CO2 from biogas from plants into concrete for construction.

“These types of hybrid solutions are really interesting,” Willmott said. “We’re very excited to invest in and procure from companies that are interesting startups and that are growing the future supply.”

Microsoft described these technologies as storing carbon for 10,000 years but only contracted 300 metric tons (equivalent to 65 gas-powered cars driven for a year) total from the two 5-year-old startups in this young sector.

According to Willmott, a big reason Microsoft chose these technologies was because these startups were affordable. 

Currently, Microsoft charges a carbon fee of $15 a ton on emissions across all three scopes, but the carbon removal purchases only cover Scopes 1, 2 and business travel (The company plans to cover all three scopes in 2030).

[Read more about Microsoft.]

The extra money from the internal carbon fee on Scope 3 emissions allows the company to buy more expensive removal purchases. The average price it paid to the carbon project creators across all the removals this year was $19.40 per ton.

“The increase in the carbon fee has been worked on for the past few years so that we could get the funding that we need to basically fulfill this higher durability portfolio because even for a big company, like Microsoft, affordability is really a concern,” she said.

View the discussion thread.


Microalgae biomass as a sustainable precursor to produce nitrogen-doped biochar for …

1 April, 2022
 

Preparing sustainable and highly efficient biochars as adsorbents remains a challenge for organic pollutant management. Herein, a novel nitrogen-doped carbon material has been synthesized via a facile and sustainable single-step pyrolysis method using a wild mixture of microalgae as novel carbon precursor. Phosphoric acid (H3PO4) was employed as activation agent to generate pores in the carbon material. In addition, the effect of melamine (nitrogen source) was evaluated over the biochar properties by the N-doping process. The results showed that the biochar’s specific surface area (SSA) increased from 324 to 433 m2 g−1 with the N-doping process. The N-doping process increased the percentage of micropores in the biochar structure. Chemical characterization of the biochars indicated that the N-doping process helped to increase the graphitization process of the biochar and the contents of oxygen and nitrogen groups on the carbon surface. The biochars were successfully tested to adsorb acetaminophen and treat two synthetic effluents, and the N-doped biochar presented the highest efficiency. The kinetics and equilibrium data were well represented by the General-order model and the Liu isotherm model, respectively. The maximum sorption capacities attained were 101.4 and 120.7 mg g−1 for the non-doped and doped biochars, respectively. The acetaminophen adsorption mechanism suggests that the pore-filling was the dominant mechanism for acetaminophen uptake. The biochars could efficiently remove up to 74% of the contaminants in synthetic effluents.


Sulfonated biochar catalyst derived from eucalyptus tree shed bark – RSC Publishing

1 April, 2022
 

Herein, fatty acid (oleic acid, OA) was upgraded to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) via esterification reaction using sulfonated biochar obtained from eucalyptus tree shed bark as solid acid catalyst. Under the optimal esterification conditions (i.e., at 65 °C for 2 h using a methanol/OA molar ratio of 10 : 1 with a catalyst dosage of 4 wt%), the FAME yield was 97.05 ± 0.28% when a solid acid catalyst prepared by loading 6 g of p-Toluenesulfonic acid (p-TSA) on 2 g of activated biochar (p-TSA3/ABC) was used. The remarkable performance of the p-TSA3/ABC could be attributed to its high acidity (468.8 μmol g−1) and dominance of the SO3H acid site on the catalyst surface. Experimental findings showed that the p-TSA3/ABC was relatively stable due to its highly functionalized structure. The catalyst was recycled for five successive cycles and exhibited no dramatic decrease in catalytic activity.

A. S. Yusuff, K. A. Thompson-Yusuff and J. Porwal, RSC Adv., 2022, 12, 10237 DOI: 10.1039/D1RA09179D

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Zurich speeds up net-zero path with carbon removal pre-purchase agreements | News | IPE

1 April, 2022
 

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IPE magazine April 2022

Zurich Insurance Group is accelerating its target for net zero emissions in operations to 2030 instead of 2050 with pre-purchase agreements for carbon removal certificates.

With pre-purchase agreements Zurich is funding projects in advance to start or scale up activities to remove carbon from the atmosphere, it announced.

The insurer has picked carbon removal suppliers InterEarth in Australia, Oregon Biochar Solutions in the US, and Restorative Ideas in Puerto Rico. It has funded in advance the suppliers to further develop, scale and commercialise their innovative technologies that are still at an early stage, it said.

InterEarth removes CO2 with the woody biomass burial method to store carbon captured within the biomass. Oregon Biochar Solutions produces biochar by thermal decomposition of organic material for carbon sequestration. Bio Restorative Ideas, on the other hand, wants to convert waste and bamboo into biochar – a high-carbon form of charcoal – in a former sugar cane factory in the southwest of Puerto Rico.

Zurich is also looking at technological solutions such as direct air capture and storage, it added.

The insurer is partnering with marketplace Puro.earth which helps match companies with legitimate carbon-removal firms assessed based on the Puro Standard, a process to issue science-based certificates for the carbon removed from the atmosphere, and the issued CO2 Removal Certificates (CORCs) into the Puro registry.

Companies buy CORCs from suppliers to neutralise emissions. The carbon removal certificate confirms that one metric tonne of CO2e has been removed from the atmosphere and stored for the long term using a proven removal method.

Zurich’s partnership with the Puro.earth certification scheme is up to date with emerging best practices for carbon sequestration in terms of calculations methodologies, auditing, ongoing project monitoring in emerging industries. However, it still lacks consistent frameworks applying globally, it said.

“To balance out our unavoidable residual emissions, we are supporting innovative carbon-removal solutions. The urgency of the situation means we need to be proactive and help scale up the carbon-removal industry, which is still in its infancy,” said Alison Martin, chief executive officer EMEA and bank distribution at Zurich.

The company has saved an estimated 1 million metric tonnes of CO2-equivalent emissions since 2008.

Last year it set a target to cut gross emissions by 50%, including a 55% cut in direct and indirect emissions in operations, and a 50% reduction in indirect emissions in the value chain by 2025.

It also set a target of a 70% cut in gross emissions, including an 80% cut in direct and indirect emissions in operations, and a 65% reduction in indirect emissions in the value chain by 2029 on the path to net zero by 2050.

Finance Ministry publishes annual white paper on Government Pension Fund

The group, which includes PGGM and MN, calls on other international investors to endorse statement

High-level expert group will assess current standards and definitions and recommend enhancements if they are found wanting

Proposed class members include financial institutions such as pension funds, asset managers, hedge funds and mutual funds

The new asset management company, called UI BVK KVG, will pool in total €150bn through funds of funds 

The results for Q4 2021 were a combination of very strong equity returns – particularly from US equities – and low, or negative, returns from bonds

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Zurich Insurance accelerates its net zero operational target to 2030 from 2050

1 April, 2022
 

Zurich Insurance Group has announced that it is advancing its goal of achieving net zero emissions in its operations by 20 years.

It now aims to meet the target by 2030, having implemented plans announced on March 31 last year to achieve absolute emissions cuts in that decade. After that, emissions that cannot be avoided will be removed from the atmosphere.

In November 2021, Zurich also announced that it would no longer underwrite new open field oil exploration projects. It has also pledged to completely eliminate thermal coal from its underwriting portfolio in rich countries by 2030 and by 2040 for the rest of the world, unless companies seeking to hedge have put in place place officially approved scientific objectives.

For its net-zero operational targets rolled out this week, Zurich said it has signed carbon-free agreements with several nature-based solution providers, where it can have the greatest impact on the development of the energy industry. carbon removal.

The company said it made advance payments to help these vendors develop, scale and commercialize their innovative and early-stage technologies.

Projects have also been selected to align with Zurich’s broader sustainability goals, including flood resilience, wildfire prevention and the development of a fairer society through the support of quality jobs in sustainable industries.

“Since we began measuring our carbon footprint in 2007, we have avoided approximately 1 million metric tons of CO2 equivalent emissions, and our goal remains to minimize them,” said Alison Martin, CEO EMEA and Bank Distribution, and the member of the executive committee responsible for sustainable development, in a press release.

To manage its unavoidable residual emissions, Martin said, Zurich supports innovative carbon removal solutions. “The urgency of the situation means we need to be proactive and help grow the carbon removal industry, which is still in its infancy.”

Carbon Removal Suppliers

The chosen carbon removal providers are InterEarth from Australia, Bio Restorative Ideas from Puerto Rico and Oregon Biochar Solutions from the United States. Zurich said its participation in these projects, facilitated by the Puro.earth carbon removal marketplace, is essential for the projects to start up and expand their operations.

The InterEarth project removes CO2 through an innovative method called woody biomass burial, Zurich explained, noting that the company grows a selection of highly adapted woody plants on degraded, low rainfall and previously cleared agricultural land in Australia.

Periodically, the plants are stripped of their aerial biomass and the harvested biomass is buried and encapsulated in dedicated underground chambers. The goal, Zurich said, is to permanently store the carbon captured in biomass.

Bio Restorative Ideas plans to convert trash and overgrown bamboo into high-quality biochar at the site of a former sugar cane factory in southwestern Puerto Rico, which will be used to improve soils with cascading benefits in food production and yield. Other applications, such as an additive to concrete or building materials, are also being studied.

Zurich explained that bamboo is a fast-growing grass and when fallen and broken, especially along waterways, it can cause blockages, flooding and erosion. By collecting it and turning it into biochar, the project also helps prevent these negative effects.

Oregon Biochar Solutions produces high-quality biochar, primarily from forestry waste, including fire-hazardous biomass and wood burned in wildfires. By removing the latter material, the risk of future fires is reduced while putting the waste to productive use, Zurich said. This US-based company already produces biochar, most of which is sold to farms, and has the capacity to expand to produce more than 3,000 metric tons per year. It uses revenue from the sale of carbon removal certificates to pass on cost savings to local farmers and entrepreneurs looking to integrate clean products into their supply chain.

Zurich said it is committed to acting now to remove carbon from the atmosphere and will continue to seek out and support additional solutions to diversify its carbon removal approach. After initially focusing on carbon removal from biomass, Zurich is now also exploring technological solutions such as direct air capture and storage.

To complement its net zero strategy, Zurich aims to have 75% of its managed procurement spend with suppliers that have science-based emissions reduction targets by 2025 and net zero targets by 2030.

Through 2030, the group will maintain the overall carbon neutrality of its operations, steadily increasing the proportion of its carbon removal offsets eligible for net zero certification.

Source: Zurich Insurance

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Nonprofit group targets water quality in Catherine and Channel lakes – utexta

2 April, 2022
 

A determined group of residents near Antioch plans to employ a new tactic to improve the quality in two connected lakes.

Friends of Catherine and Channel Lakesa nonprofit organization established in 2016, has a detailed lake management plan to reduce pollution and eradicate invasive species in two of Illinois’ northernmost lakes.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        


Runoff containing phosphorus can lead to algae blooms in local lakes.
– Courtesy of Amy Littleton


These are the types of “socks” that will be hung from docks and placed strategically in Catherine and Channel lakes near Antioch to absorb nutrients that cause algae blooms.
– Courtesy of Biochar Now LLC

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biochar market size industry Archives – Write on Wall "Global Community of writers"

2 April, 2022
 

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WriteOnWall (wow) welcomes you to join our community. We respect all our users/visitors and their opinion, this is the first and only rule of our site. Enjoy our platform but refrain yourself from posting any opinion/message which can offend others.

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Hardwood spent mushroom substrate–based activated biochar as a sustainable … – SpringerLink

2 April, 2022
 

Hardwood spent mushroom substrate was employed as a carbon precursor to prepare activated biochars using phosphoric acid (H3PO4) as chemical activator. The activation process was carried out using an impregnation ratio of 1 precursor:2 H3PO4; pyrolysis temperatures of 700, 800, and 900 °C; heating rate of 10 °C min−1; and treatment time of 1 h. The specific surface area (SSA) of the biochars reached 975, 1031, and 1215 m2 g−1 for the samples pyrolyzed at 700, 800, and 900 °C, respectively. The percentage of mesopores in their structures was 75.4%, 78.5%, and 82.3% for the samples pyrolyzed at 700, 800, and 900 °C, respectively. Chemical characterization of the biochars indicated disordered carbon structures with the presence of oxygen and phosphorous functional groups on their surfaces. The biochars were successfully tested to adsorb acetaminophen and treat two simulated pharmaceutical effluents composed of organic and inorganic compounds. The kinetic data from adsorption of acetaminophen were fitted to the Avrami fractional-order model, and the equilibrium data was well represented by the Liu isotherm model, attaining a maximum adsorption capacity of 236.8 mg g−1 for the biochar produced at 900 °C. The adsorption process suggests that the pore-filling mechanism mainly dominates the acetaminophen removal, although van der Walls forces are also involved. The biochar produced at 900 °C removed up to 84.7% of the contaminants in the simulated effluents. Regeneration tests using 0.1 M NaOH + 20% EtOH as eluent showed that the biochars could be reused; however, the adsorption capacity was reduced by approximately 50% after three adsorption–desorption cycles.

Pharmaceuticals are a large and diverse group of human and veterinary medicinal compounds used in large quantities worldwide [1]. These types of chemicals are classified as emerging pollutants, i.e., synthetic or natural substances generated by human activities that may cause ecological impacts but are not included in routine monitoring programs. However, depending on their (eco)toxicity, potential health effects, and occurrence, these compounds may be candidates for future regulation [2, 3]. Pharmaceuticals are chemicals designed to alter the body’s metabolic processes, functions, and structures for the patient’s benefit. The drugs are metabolized mainly through the liver and digestive system; however, this process does not occur in 100%. This means that metabolized and free forms of the drugs are excreted and end up in wastewater that in urban areas is commonly transported to sewage treatment plants. Apart from this, solid waste treatment plants equipped with suitable technology for recycling or destruction of harmful chemicals are uncommon in most countries, and pharmaceuticals that are past the expiration date are often disposed of together with household garbage or flushed in toilets, which leads to increased pressure on the environment. Pharmaceutical compounds, such as cancer and psychiatric drugs, antibiotics, analgesics, and anti-inflammatories, among others, have been found in rivers [4], surface waters [5], and groundwater [6]. Leachates from municipal solid waste landfill sites have also been described as the cause of surface and groundwater contamination [7, 8]. Research studies have found that the continuous presence of pharmaceuticals in surface water, even in concentrations of µg L−1 or ng L−1, has the potential to over time interact with organisms and cause a wide range of ecological and human health problems [9, 10].

Conventional urban sewage water treatment, based on biological processing and activated sludge, is usually unable to remove residual concentrations of all kinds of pharmaceuticals [11], meaning that some drugs always make it into the fresh waters of rivers, lakes, and seas. Advanced treatments to reduce the concentration of emerging pollutants in water include the following: ozonation, which is usually incapable of removing common persistent micropollutants such as X-ray contrast media [12]. Membrane technologies are available in a wide span of options adapted for different applications, but the running costs of using this technology depend on water-quality issues [13]. The solar photo-Fenton method, by itself, is used to degrade organic contaminants, but it needs to be combined with other methods based on adsorption to obtain water free of degradation products [14, 15]. Photo-Fenton electrochemical degradation is quite an unexplored and complex technology that involves the use of chemicals and expensive equipment [16]. Photolysis, photocatalysis, and photodegradation lead to degradation products and require expensive equipment [17,18,19]. Electrochemical oxidation also requires the use of chemicals and expensive equipment [20]. Different treatments based on biosorption using algae and fungi are not very efficient, and the possibility of regenerating the biosorbent is minimal [21]. Adsorption using different materials based on clay minerals is an efficient option for the removal of contaminants from water, but the adsorbent production methods and raw materials are usually expensive [22,23,24]. Therefore, most of these technologies represent an unrealistic solution in underdeveloped and developing countries.

Research has shown that filters based on activated carbon made of precursors such as different types of biomasses are a good option for the removal of emerging pollutants from water [25,26,27,28]. This type of technology has several advantages, such as initial low implementation and operation costs, and the removal effectiveness can reach 100%. This urges the development of water cleaning methods based on inexpensive and widely available biomass residues.

White-rot fungi such as Pleurotus spp. and Lentinula edodes, among others, are commonly cultivated on substrates made of hardwood sawdust and have the ability to use cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin as carbon sources. The edible mushroom industry represents a multimillion-dollar industry. China is one of the largest producers and exporters of edible mushrooms with approximately 80% of the products in the global market, followed by the EU and the USA that stand for approximately 10%. The total global production of edible mushrooms is approximately 34 Mt with a 30-fold increase since 1978, which corresponds to a value of around 34 billion USD [29]. After cultivation, approximately 70 wt% dry mass of the initial substrate usually remains as a waste known as spent mushroom substrate (SMS) [30, 31]. The latter has no commercial value and cannot always be reused within the mushroom production processes and, therefore, represents a problematic waste that needs to be disposed of without generating environmental issues. This type of waste is mainly composed of partially degraded cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin and could be used as a precursor to produce carbon-based materials to remove emerging contaminants from water.

This paper shows how birch wood–based SMS can be utilized as a precursor for producing high surface area meso/microporous biochars using the chemical activation method with phosphoric acid at different process temperatures. The carbons were characterized for their textural properties by N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms, and surface functionalities were identified using Raman, Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface morphology of the biochars was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The efficiency of the produced biochars to remove micropollutants from water was examined in batch assays using acetaminophen and synthetic effluents composed of organic and inorganic compounds. The adsorption capacity, kinetics, and adsorption mechanisms were discussed.

Spent mushroom substrate (SMS) was obtained from a previous work where Pleurotus ostreatus mushroom was cultivated on different substrates [32]. The SMS used in this work was composed of birch (Betula spp.) sawdust and a minor amount of wheat bran. The raw SMS was milled and screen-sieved to obtain a material with homogeneous particle size. Particles with a diameter between 1 and 2 mm were used as carbon precursor to prepare the activated biochars.

The precursor used for each experiment (100 g) was mixed with phosphoric acid (50 wt%) using a weight ratio of 1 precursor:2 acid, kneaded to obtain a homogeneous blend and left overnight at room temperature in a sealed container. The activation process was carried out in one step by pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere using a tubular stainless steel reactor (diameter of 100 mm and length of 200 mm) equipped with a thermocouple to measure the temperature of the sample. The reactor was heated externally by an electric muffle furnace. The impregnated precursor was placed in the reactor and heated from room temperature to a final temperature of 700, 800, and 900 °C under N2 gas flow (500 mL min−1, 99.99%) at a heating rate of 10 °C min−1. The final temperature was kept for 1 h, and after that, the sample was allowed to cool down to a temperature below 150 °C under a N2 gas flow of 250 mL min−1. Next, the N2 gas was closed, and the sample was allowed to cool down to room temperature overnight. To remove by-products from the carbonaceous matrix, the produced biochars were washed several times successively with hot water until a neutral pH was attained. The samples were finally dried overnight in an oven at 105 °C to obtain the final product.

The textural characterization of the biochars was performed by N2 adsorption − desorption analysis using Tristar 3000 apparatus, Micrometrics Instrument Corp., Norcross, GA, USA. The samples were first degassed at 110 °C for 3 h under N2 flow and then measured at liquid N2 temperature (− 196 °C). The specific surface area (SSA) of the samples was calculated by multipoint N2 sorptiometry using the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) principle. In addition, pore-volume, average pore size, and pore size distribution were obtained from sorption isotherms using the Barrett − Joyner − Halenda (BJH) model.

Representative samples of the biochars were analyzed using Raman, Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to identify surface functionalities. The morphology of each biochar was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Raman spectra were collected using a Bruker Bravo handheld spectrometer (Bruker, Ettlingen, Germany) attached to a docking measuring station. The biochar samples were manually ground using an agate mortar and pestle, placed in 5-mL glass vials, and scanned in the 300–3200-cm−1 spectral range at 4 cm−1 resolution for 256 scans. Min–max normalization over the 1000–2000-cm−1 region and smoothing (9 points) was done using the built-in functions of the OPUS software (version 7, Bruker Optik GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany); baseline correction was not needed. FT-IR spectra were collected with a Bruker IFS 66v/S instrument (Bruker Optics, Germany) in the 4000–400 cm−1 spectral range at 4 cm−1 resolution for 256 scans. Approximately 5 mg of sample was mixed with 400 mg of spectroscopy-grade potassium bromide (KBr) (Uvasol, Merck KGaA, Germany) and manually finely ground using an agate mortar and pestle. Background spectra were collected using pure ground KBr. FT-IR spectra were treated using a 64-point rubber band baseline correction and vector normalization over the 3700–500-cm−1 region using the Opus software. XPS spectra were collected using a Kratos Axis Ultra DLD electron spectrometer using a monochromated Al Kα source operated at 150 W. Analyzer pass energy of 160 eV for acquiring survey spectra and a pass energy of 20 eV for individual photoelectron lines were used. The samples were gently hand-pressed using a clean Ni spatula into a special powder sample holder. Because activated carbon samples are conductive, no charge neutralization system was used. Binding energy (BE) scale was calibrated following the ASTM E2108 and ISO 15472 standards. Processing of the spectra was accomplished with the Kratos software. SEM imaging was carried out using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM; Zeiss Merlin) with an in-lens secondary electron detector. The instrument was operated at an accelerating voltage of 5 kV and probe current of 100 pA. Samples were attached to carbon tape mounted on aluminum stubs and coated with 2 nm of platinum using a Quorum Technologies Q150T ES device.

The acetaminophen initial solution concentrations used for the adsorption tests varied from 10 to 1000 mg L−1 at different pH (3.0 to 9.0). Then, aliquots of 20.00 mL of acetaminophen were added to 50.0 mL Falcon flat tubes containing different biochar masses (from 20 to 80 mg). All the adsorption tests were performed at a fixed temperature of 22 °C. First, the Falcon tubes containing acetaminophen and biochars were agitated in a KS250 shaker (IKA Labortechnik) for 1 to 360 min. Afterwards, to separate the biochars from the solutions, the tubes were kept vertical, and a few seconds later, the biochar particles settled down, and with a pipette, the solution was withdrawn; no centrifugation was needed. Next, the residual acetaminophen solutions were measured using a UV–Visible spectrophotometer (Shimadzu 1800) at a maximum wavelength of 243 nm. The adsorption capacity (Eq. 1) and the percentage of acetaminophen removed (Eq. 2) are given below:

where q denotes the removal capacity of acetaminophen adsorbed by the biochars (mg g−1); C0 the initial acetaminophen solution concentration in contact with the biochars (mg L−1); Cf the final acetaminophen concentration after adsorption (mg L−1); m the mass of biochars (g); and V the aliquot of the acetaminophen solution (L) introduced in the tube.

The influence of the mass of the biochars on acetaminophen removal was performed using an initial concentration of 200 mg L−1, a contact time of 6 h, natural pH of 6.0, and biochar mass varying from 20 to 80 mg in 20 mL of acetaminophen solution.

To study of the influence of the initial pH, adsorption tests using acetaminophen solutions with an initial concentration of 200 mg L−1 and pH ranging from 3.0 to 9.0 were carried out using an adsorbent dosage of 2.0 g L−1 and a contact time of 6 h. These experiments were carried out in triplicate. Average values with standard deviation are reported.

For regeneration tests, acetaminophen-laden biochars were washed with water to remove any unadsorbed drug and dried overnight in an oven at 50 °C. The dried-laden biochars were contacted with two eluents, i.e., 0.1 M NaOH + 20% EtOH and 0.25 M NaOH + 20% EtOH and agitated for 6 h [27]. The desorbed pharmaceutical was then separated from the biochar. The latter was washed with water to remove the eluent and dried overnight in an oven at 50 °C. The adsorption capacity of the recycled adsorbent was measured again. A total of four consecutive adsorption–desorption cycles were carried out. This was done in triplicate; average values with standard deviation are reported.

Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and Avrami fractional-order models were used to fit the kinetic data [33,34,35,36]. The mathematical equations of these respective models are shown in Eqs. 3, 4, and 5.

where t denotes the contact time (min); qt and qe are the amount of adsorbate adsorbed at time t and the equilibrium, respectively (mg g−1); k1 is the pseudo-first-order rate constant (min−1); k2 the pseudo-second-order rate constant (g mg−1 min−1); kAV the Avrami fractional-order constant rate (min−1); and nAV the dimensionless Avrami exponent.

Langmuir, Freundlich, and Liu’s models were employed for the analysis of equilibrium data; Eqs. 6, 7, and 8 show the corresponding models [33,34,35,36].

where qe denotes the adsorbate amount adsorbed at equilibrium (mg g−1); Ce denotes the adsorbate concentration at equilibrium (mg L−1); Qmax denotes the maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbent (mg g−1); KL denotes the Langmuir equilibrium constant (L mg−1); KF denotes the Freundlich equilibrium constant [mg g−1 (mg L−1)−1/nF]; Kg denotes the Liu equilibrium constant (L mg−1); and nF and nL are the dimensionless exponents of Freundlich and Liu models, respectively.

The fitting of the kinetic and equilibrium data was evaluated using nonlinear methods, which were evaluated using the Simplex method and the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm using the fitting facilities of the Microcal Origin 2020 software. The suitableness of the kinetic and equilibrium models were evaluated using the determination coefficient (R2), the adjusted determination coefficient (R2adj), and the standard deviation of residues (SD) [25, 27, 33, 34] showed in the Eqs. 9, 10, 11 below.

In the above equations, qi, model is the individual theoretical q value predicted by the model; qi, exp is the individual experimental q value; ({overline{q}}_{i,mathrm{exp}}) is the average of all experimental q values measured; n is the number of experiments; and p is the number of parameters in the fitting model.

The R2adj and SD values were used to compare different models of kinetics and equilibrium presented in this work. The best-fitted model would present the highest R2adj and lowest SD values [25, 27, 33, 34].

Two synthetic aqueous effluents made of different pharmaceuticals, as well as other organic and inorganic compounds (Table 1), were used to test the ability of the biochars for treating real effluents. The relative effectiveness of each biochar to remove contaminants from each effluent was calculated based on the area under the UV–Vis spectra before and after the adsorption treatment under the band of absorption from 190 to 800 nm. As was found in other studies [27], this is a quick and simple method that provides an idea of the behavior of the adsorbent during treatment of mixtures of different chemicals even if the λmax of some of the components is outside the measured spectral range.

All three biochars displayed the same trend of the N2 isotherm curve of adsorption/desorption (Fig. 1a, b, and c), which is closed to the so-called type IV isotherm, according to IUPAC [37]. A type IV isotherm shows hysteresis, which belongs to the mesoporous materials. However, the curves also indicate the presence of some microporosity due to the high N2 adsorption volume at low pressure. The pyrolysis temperature seemed to have influenced only the total N2 amount adsorbed.

N2 isotherms (a, b, and c) and pore size distribution (d, e, and f) for the biochars

Although the temperature did not influence the type of the N2 isotherm, it influenced to a good extent the porosity of the biochar-700, biochar-800, and biochar-900. Table 2 shows that the SSA values increased as the temperature increased. The biochar-900 exhibited the highest SSA equal to 1215 m2 g−1.

All three biochars presented a high presence of mesopores on their structures: 75.4%, 78.5%, and 82.3% for biochar-700, biochar-800, and biochar-900, respectively. In addition, the pyrolysis temperature also influenced the total pore volume with values of 0.7086, 0.7163, and 0.8357 cm3 g−1 for biochar-700, biochar-800, and biochar-900, respectively. Thus, most of the total pore volume is composed of the mesopore contribution (see values in Table 2).

The presence of both mesopores and micropores is significant for their use as adsorbents for micropollutant adsorption applications because they have significant and different roles concerning the efficient pollutant diffusion in the pore networks of the adsorbent materials [25, 38, 39].

BJH measurements show the pore size distribution for the three biochars (Fig. 1d, e, and f). Although the pyrolysis temperature shows no effect on the biochars’ pore structure, the samples show similar curves with the prominent peak in the same region at around 3.7 nm; virtually, no pores larger than 30 nm are present in the samples. In addition, the curves show that from 20 nm smaller sizes, the volume adsorption starts to rise to highlight the presence of a large number of large micropores or mesopores from bigger than 2 and smaller than 20 nm.

To examine the influence of the pyrolysis conditions and H3PO4 activation on the surface morphology of the biochars, they were subjected to SEM analysis. Figure 2 shows the surface morphology of the three biochars. The SEM images display that all samples present intact structures with roughness and irregular structure with big amounts of holes and cavities that seem to be in a bigger extent for the biochar-800 and biochar-900, which is in accordance with the SSA and pore structure results. By the SEM analysis, it is possible to infer that the pyrolysis temperature (under H3PO4 activation) influenced the surface characteristics of the biochars. In addition, the images also show large presence of macropores and ultramacropores; this is very important because if the biochars are used as adsorbent to remove pollutants from waters, they serve as vectors of passage of solution through macropores until it attains smaller pores (in the interior of the biochars).

SEM images of biochars: a biochar-700 at 500 × of magnification, b biochar-700 at 2 KX of magnification; c biochar-800 at 500 × of magnification, d biochar-800 at 2 KX of magnification; e biochar-900 at 500 × of magnification, f biochar-900 at 2 KX of magnification

FTIR analysis was carried out to observe how the pyrolysis temperature influenced the presence of chemical functional groups on the biochars’ surfaces; it provides valuable information about the chemical surface activity of the biochars. The functional groups present in the biochars are shown in Fig. 3a.

FTIR (a) and Raman (b) spectra of the biochars

The spectra identified the presence of –OH stretching vibration at 3438 cm−1. At 2930 cm−1, it can be assigned to the C–H group stretching vibrate in long-chain aliphatic components [40, 41], while the peak at 1628 cm−1 is related to C = O from carboxylic compounds [41]. At 1141 and 1004 cm−1, the amino phosphonic acid functional group and P–OH bonds can be assigned, demonstrating that a reaction occurred between H3PO4 and the precursor matrix to form biochar-700, biochar-800, and biochar-900 [40]. The addition of P-containing functional groups on biochars surfaces might positively affect the acetaminophen adsorption. In addition, the peaks at 611 and 479 cm−1 could be assigned to the C–H of alkenes and alkanes.

Raman spectroscopy analysis was performed to evaluate the degree of graphitization of the prepared biochars. From the spectra was determined the ID/IG band ratio (Fig. 3b) calculated using the area under each peak. The lower ID/IG value indicates that biochar exhibits a more perfect and orderly graphite structures with a high graphitization degree [42], while a higher ID/IG reveals more structural defects in carbon materials. Moreover, ID/IG values also serve to identify the size of the sp2 domain related to graphite structure in the biochar structure [39, 42]. Figure 3b shows that the pyrolysis temperature did influence the graphitization degree of the biochars. The ID/IG band ratios were 1.04 (700 °C), 1.26 (800 °C), and 1.29 (900 °C), respectively. These values suggest a lower degree of graphitization of biochars resulting from the abundant presence of structural defects such as bonding disorders, vacancies, and heteroatoms in the graphene layers [42] as the pyrolysis temperature is increased. These defects may help provide more adsorption sites, which reflect better adsorption properties.

The elemental composition and chemical state of the biochars were evaluated through XPS analysis. XPS spectra provide more details on different surface modifications caused by oxidative-acidic treatments. Figure 4 shows C 1 s, O 1 s, and P 2p3/2 spectra, carbon, oxygen, and phosphorus bonds, respectively.

XPS spectra of the C 1 s, O 1 s, and P 2p for the produced biochars

For all the investigated biochar samples, at least six forms of carbon occurring on the surface can be found (Fig. 4). The deconvolution of the C 1 s spectra shows bands at 284.2 eV which is assigned to graphitic carbon. The bands at 285.4–286.6 eV can be attributed to phenols ethers or alcohols (C–O–) and C–P bonds. At 287.5–287.8 eV, the bands can be attributed to carbonyl, quinone, or carbon bonded to nitrogen structures (C = O, C–N). At 288.5–288.7 eV, the bands are usually assigned to carboxylic groups or esters (COO). Moreover, the band at 290.1 eV is assigned to carbonates, occluded CO, or π-electrons in aromatic rings (C = O/C = C) [43,44,45].

These structures are confirmed by O 1 s spectra (Fig. 4) which shows bands at 530.3 eV, which might correspond to oxygen singly bonded to carbon and phosphorus groups (C–O–P groups), or metal oxides [43,44,45]; C = O bonds can be assigned at around 532 eV [43,44,45], and the band at around 533.9 eV is usually assigned to oxygen singly bounded to carbon in phenols and ethers [45]. The band at around 537 eV seen in the biochar-900 °C is occluded CO or CO2 [45].

For the P 2p spectra, a band at 132.4 or 132.5 eV is observed in all three biochars that is commonly assigned to phosphate species in which P atom is bonded to O atoms (P–OH and or C–O–PO3) [43, 44, 46], which is in agreement with the FT-IR results. The presence of P chemical bonds was also evidenced in the O 1 s spectrum (Fig. 4). Another band at 133.2–133.4 eV is also observed in the three biochars, which is attributed to C–PO3 and or C3–PO [44, 46]. The presence of P is related to the H3PO4 activation process, which acted also as P-doping process and can result in better adsorption properties.

The quantitative information for the main elements, from XPS, is shown in Table 3. The amount of C presented on the three biochars was high and had no significant variance. The O content also showed no big variance and presented high values for all samples. About the P-functional groups, as the temperature increased, the presence of P decreased; a large number of functionalities on the biochars’ surfaces (especially for functional groups related to C = O, C–OH, and P = O (see Table 3) can result in better adsorption performances.

The adsorbent mass or dosage effect on the adsorption process is crucial for making the adsorption process applicable on an industrial scale because it avoids waste generation and minimizes costs associated with the process [47, 48].

The biochar’s mass effect on acetaminophen removal was carried out varying amounts of biochar from 20 to 80 mg in 20 mL of acetaminophen solution, at an initial concentration of 200 mg L−1, 6 h of agitation, pH 6.0, and temperature of 23 °C. The results obtained are presented in Fig. 5.

Influence of the biochar mass on acetaminophen removal a biochar-700, b biochar-800, and c biochar-900. Adsorption experimental conditions: the initial adsorbate concentration was 200 mg L−1, contact time of 6 h; temperature of 22 °C; initial pH adsorbate solution was 6.0 (natural solution pH)

The percentage of removal increases as the biochar mass increases and its maximum (100%) was obtained for masses of 50.0, 60.0, and 70.0 mg for biochar-900, biochar-800, and biochar-700, respectively. Figure 5 shows that the acetaminophen percentage of removal increases, from 52 to 100%, as the biochar-700 mass is increased from 20 to 70 mg, respectively. For the biochar-800, the percentage of removal increased from 56.0 to 100.0% when the mass was increased from 20.0 to 60.0 mg, while for biochar-900, the percentage of removal increased from 68.0 to 100.0% when the mass increased from 20.0 to 50.0 mg. The highest efficiencies followed the highest SSA values, biochar-700, biochar-800, and biochar-900, respectively (see Fig. 5).

Increased biochar mass led to an increase in the available area and adsorption sites responsible for the adsorption process, and, therefore, the adsorption increased [47, 48]. On the other hand, for the adsorption capacity, an increase in the biochar’s mass led to a continuous decrease in the q value as the adsorbent mass increases. This phenomenon could be mathematically explained by Eq. 12.

Considering that when the percentage of removal attains a plateau (its value becomes practically constant) and that the value of volume and initial concentration of the pharmaceutical are fixed values, the sorption capacity is inversely proportional to the mass of the adsorbent.

Based on biochar mass studies, the optimal mass amount of the biochars was set up to be 40.0 mg (2.0 g L−1). At this dosage, the removal capacities were 83, 87, and 98% for biochar-700, biochar-800, and biochar-900, respectively, practically attaining a plateau. This choice is justified because using a mass amount higher than 40 mg would not considerably improve the removal capacity [46, 47].

Therefore, for further adsorption experimental studies (effect of the pH, kinetic and isotherm studies and effluent treatment), the mass of biochar was fixed at 40.0 mg in 20.0 mL of adsorbate solution (2.0 g L−1).

The role of pH in acetaminophen ionization is significant due to the presence of different functional groups on the biochars’ surfaces [25]. Figure 6 shows the adsorption capacity vs. the pH of the acetaminophen solution. It can be seen that for pH values 3–9, the q values were practically constant. These outcomes suggest that the adsorption mechanism for acetaminophen on the prepared biochars should not be electrostatic since it is not pH-dependent [25, 27]. Instead, pore-filling should be the most dominant mechanism of adsorption, which will be discussed later.

Influence of initial pH on the acetaminophen removal. Adsorption experimental conditions: the initial adsorbate concentration was 200 m L−1, contact time of 6 h, temperature of 22 °C, adsorbent dosage of 2.0 g L−1

These results are supported by literature. Saucier et al. [25] prepared magnetic biochar and applied them for adsorption of acetaminophen. They varied the pH from 3 to 10 and found that the removal was practically constant within this pH interval. No pH influence was detected.

Based on the pH studies, further adsorption experiments were carried out with acetaminophen solutions with pH 6.0 (pH of the used deionized water); therefore, it was unnecessary to make any pH adjustments if the solution remains within pH 3.0–9.0. The same is true for the synthetic effluents.

Kinetics of adsorption is an essential factor in determining the adsorption mechanism, associated with other data of characterization of the adsorbent and adsorbate and the equilibrium studies. The adsorption kinetics of acetaminophen on the biochars was explored using nonlinear pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and Avrami fractional-order kinetic models.

The kinetic curves and fitting parameters of the models are shown in Fig. 7 and Table 4, respectively. The suitability of the models was evaluated through the adjusted determination coefficient (R2Adj) and standard deviation (SD) [27, 38, 39, 47,48,49]. Lower SD and higher R2Adj values show a reduced disparity between experimental and theoretical q values and, therefore, higher suitability of the model [38, 39, 49,50,51]. Based on that, the Avrami fractional-order model was the most suitable because it presented the highest R2adj and lowest SD values for the three biochars (Table 4).

Kinetic (a, b, and c) and intraparticle (d, e, and f) curves for acetaminophen adsorption on the biochars. a, d Biochar-700, b, e biochar-800, and c, f biochar-900. Adsorption experimental conditions: the initial adsorbate concentration was 200 mg L−1, temperature of 22 °C, adsorbent dosage of 2.0 g L−1, initial pH adsorbate solution 6.0

These results indicate that the Avrami fractional-order explained better the adsorption process of acetaminophen by all three biochars. The Avrami model indicates that the adsorption is complex, and the adsorption mechanisms follow different pathways [50, 51]. To further understand the adsorption process, intraparticle diffusion graphs are also shown (see Fig. 7d, e, and f). The adsorption dynamics included three stages. The first stage can be related to boundary diffusion, where the adsorbate diffused on the adsorbent exterior surface [36, 52]. Intraparticle diffusion into the pores of the adsorbent represents the second stage [36, 52]. In the third stage, the acetaminophen was adsorbed and diffused into the interior site of the biochars (through smaller pores), which is followed by the attainment of equilibrium [36, 52].

Further evaluating the kinetic process, t0.5 and t0.95 were studied. The values were calculated from the best model, Avrami. They represent the time (min) when 50% and 95% of saturation (qe) is attained, respectively [47, 48]. For biochar-700, t0.5 was 18.92, and t0.95 was 183.2 min. For biochar-800 and biochar-900, the values were 14.10 (t0.5) and 158.3 (t0.95) and 7.39 (t0.5) and 82.2 (t0.95), respectively (see Table 4).

Due to the biochar-900 textural properties and chemical surface features, it had a faster kinetic of adsorption when the values of t0.5 and t0.95 are considered. Biochar-900 displayed the highest SSA and higher amount of micro and mesopores (see Table 2), and this can explain the better efficiency in the adsorption process.

The adsorption work was further continued by establishing the contact times such as 3.5 h. The established contact time was slightly higher than the t0.95 to ensure that the adsorption process had enough time to reach the equilibrium between acetaminophen and biochars because t0.95 will attain 95% saturation; the equilibrium should be established when the complete saturation of the adsorbent is attained.

Equilibrium of adsorption is one of the most critical pieces of information for the correct understanding of an adsorption process. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the adsorption mechanism pathways and effective design of the adsorption system [27, 38, 39, 47,48,49]. Therefore, the equilibrium system between acetaminophen and the biochars was evaluated using the nonlinear fitting of Langmuir, Freundlich, and Liu models and the obtained data are displayed in Fig. 8 and Table 5, respectively.

Isotherm curves for acetaminophen adsorption on the biochar-700 (a), biochar-800 (b), and biochar-900 (c). Adsorption experimental conditions: the initial adsorbate concentration from 10 to 1000 mg L−1, contact time of 3.5 h, temperature of 22 °C, absorbent dosage of 2.0 g L−1, initial pH adsorbate solution 6.0

The suitability of the equilibrium models was evaluated in the same way as for the kinetic studies (through R2Adj and SD values). Based on that, the Liu isotherm model was the most suitable model for all three biochars because it presented the highest R2Adj and lowest SD values. It was, therefore, used to describe the relationship between acetaminophen and the biochars adsorption system.

This isotherm model can be applied to both homogenous and heterogeneous systems, and it has a hybrid adsorption mechanism, which does not follow ideal monolayer adsorption. This is highlighted because Freundlich did not provide a good fit for the experimental adsorption data (see Fig. 8 and Table 5). This suggests that the adsorption process of acetaminophen on the three biochars was more homogenous than heterogeneous.

Based on the porosity, chemical characterization and adsorption data such as SSA, pore size distribution, surface functionalities, initial pH solution, the kinetics of adsorption, and equilibrium studies, the possible acting mechanisms of adsorption of acetaminophen on the biochars are suggested in Fig. 9.

Mechanism of adsorption for acetaminophen on the biochar matrix

It can be stated that electrostatic attraction was not the primary mechanism acting between acetaminophen and the biochars since it depends on pH, and it was shown that the pH did not influence the acetaminophen removal. However, some interactions such as van der Walls (hydrophobic interactions, π–π stacking), hydrogen bonds, and polar interactions of the oxygen and nitrogen groups of the acetaminophen with the polar groups of the biochars took place [35, 49]. In addition, Nguyen et al. [53] also reported a minor contribution of weak van der Waals force in the adsorption mechanism of acetaminophen on biochars.

The major mechanism that took place on the acetaminophen removal was the pore-filling due to the well-developed pore structure and elevated SSA values. Therefore, the pore-filling largely contributed to the high efficiency of acetaminophen adsorption (Fig. 9).

Due to the dimensions of the acetaminophen molecule (1.19 nm (length), 0.75 nm (width), and 0.46 nm (thickness)), it is expectable that it can easily access the wider and also some of the narrower micropores. Galhetas et al. [54] reported that the affinity of acetaminophen molecules is maximized by pores centered at pore widths near 0.7 nm. Table 2 shows that our biochars presented large portions of mesopores that facilitate the acetaminophen adsorption.

Considering the excellent properties of the biochars for acetaminophen removal, it is expected that all three biochars could be effectively employed in the treatment of wastewaters composed of compounds commonly found in effluents from hospitals or pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, two synthetic wastewaters with seven drugs and other organic and inorganic compounds, usually found in wastewaters (Table 1), were employed to test the ability of the biochars to clean them up (Fig. 10).

Effluents spectra of non-treated and treated with biochar-700, biochar-800, and biochar-900. For the composition of effluents A and B, see Table 1

The results showed, for the three biochars, interesting percentage of removals for both effluents. For effluent A, percentages were 68.6%, 74.2%, and 76.3% for biochar-700, biochar-800, and biochar-900, respectively, while for the effluent B, the percentages were 76.4%, 81.6%, and 84.7% for biochar-700, biochar-800, and biochar-900, respectively. Thus, the results strongly support the practical application of the biochars in treating real pharmaceutical wastewaters.

The biochar with the better acetaminophen removal performance (biochar-900) was used to evaluate the regeneration studies. The sample was tested in four adsorption–desorption cycles. The tests were performed at an acetaminophen initial concentration of 300 mg L−1, an adsorbent dosage of 2.0 g L−1, and two eluents were employed (solutions of 0.1 M NaOH + 20% EtOH and 0.25 M NaOH + 20% EtOH).

Figure 11 shows that the eluent 0.1 M NaOH + 20% EtOH resulted in a better recyclability efficiency. The worse efficiency for the 0.25 M NaOH + 20% EtOH eluent could be explained by the fact that the higher concentration of NaOH could compete with the acetaminophen molecules, cover the biochar surface, and get trapped into the small pores of the biochar [27] (17.7% of the SSA is composed of micropores, see Table 2).

Cycles of adsorption of acetaminophen onto biochar-900

With the eluent 0.1 M NaOH + 20% EtOH, the 2nd cycle adsorbed roughly 70% of the acetaminophen, while in the 4th cycle, the removal was approximately 44%. This decrease could be caused by acetaminophen molecules seized in the small pores of the biochar, which is difficult to be removed by the eluent [27].

To sum up, the biochars exhibited good reusability for a second cycle. However, further experiments on testing different eluents could help the biochar to reach even higher adsorption performances after two or more cycles.

In this work, birch wood–based spent mushroom substrate (SMS) was employed as a precursor to prepare highly porous biochars using a single step activation procedure with phosphoric acid (H3PO4) as a chemical activator. The main results from this research can be summarized as follows:

The pyrolysis temperature influenced, positively, the porosity of the biochars. The specific surface areas (SSA) were 975 m2 g−1 (700 °C), 1031 m2 g−1 (800 °C), and 1215 m2 g−1 (900 °C).

The biochars presented a very high percentage of mesopores in their structures, 75.4% (700 °C), 78.5% (800 °C), and 82.3% (900 °C).

Chemical characterization of the biochars indicated disordered carbon structures with the presence of oxygen and phosphorous functional groups on their surfaces.

The kinetic data were fitted to the Avrami fractional-order model and equilibrium of adsorption data was well represented by the Liu isotherm model, attaining a very high adsorption capacity of 236.8 mg g−1 for the sample pyrolyzed at 900 °C.

The adsorption mechanism suggests that the pore-filling mechanism mainly dominates the acetaminophen removal, although van der Walls forces are also involved in the process.

The employment of the biochars in the treatment of simulated pharmaceutical effluents showed a high percentage of removal (up to 84.7%).

The biochars can be regenerated using 0.1 M NaOH + 20% EtOH solution as an eluent; however, the percentage of removal was reduced by approximately 50% after three adsorption–desorption cycles.

The above results strongly suggest that birch wood–based SMS was a highly efficient precursor for biochar preparation, which could be effectively used to treat real effluents containing micropollutants.

We thank Bio4Energy, a Strategic Research Environment appointed by the Swedish government, as well as the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences for supporting this work. The Umeå Core Facility for Electron Microscopy (UCEM-NMI node) and the Vibrational Spectroscopy Core Facility (ViSp) at the Chemical Biological Centre (KBC), Umeå University, are gratefully acknowledged. The Wallenberg Wood Science Center (WWSC) is gratefully acknowledged. This work is also a part of the Johan Gadolin Process Chemistry Centre at Åbo Akademi University. The authors want to thank Alexandr Talyzin, Department of Physics, Umeå University, for the valuable comments on the manuscript.

Open access funding provided by Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. This research was funded by the Re:source program (P42481) and BioInnovation (2017–02705), co-financed by the Swedish State Innovation Department (VINNOVA), the Swedish Energy Agency, and the Swedish Research Council FORMAS (2021–00877).

Alejandro Grimm: conceptualization, methodology, investigation, data curation, writing -original draft, funding acquisition. Glaydson S. dos Reis: data curation, writing — original draft. Van Minh Dinh: data curation, formal analysis. Sylvia H. Larsson: resources. Jyri-Pekka Mikkola: writing — review and editing. Eder C. Lima: writing — review and editing. Shaojun Xiong: writing — review and editing, funding acquisition.

Correspondence to Alejandro Grimm or Glaydson Simões dos Reis.

The authors declare no competing interests.

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Received: 24 November 2021

Revised: 14 March 2022

Accepted: 21 March 2022

Published: 02 April 2022

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13399-022-02618-7


Biochar Microtube Interconnected Hydrotalcite Nanosheets for the Adsorption of Aqueous Sb(III)

2 April, 2022
 

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Received 15 March 2022
Revised 31 March 2022
Accepted 1 April 2022
Accepted Manuscript online 2 April 2022

https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6528/ac639a

Actuated by the non-ionic heavy metal of antimony (Sb) contaminants with undesired toxicity to the environment and human health, capturing Sb is urgent to remedy contaminated water. Herein, the lamellar MnCo hydrotalcite was grown on catkin-derived biochar through the in-situ etching of ZIF-L to construct a hierarchical microtube@nanosheet hybrid (CLMH) for Sb immobilization. The adsorption behaviour and mechanism of trivalent antimony (Sb (III)) on the CLMH were investigated. The CLMH shows good pH applicability for capturing Sb(III) at pH from 2 to 9. The excellent adsorption capacity of CLMH for Sb(III) is 247.62 mg/g at 303 K, and the endothermic process is proved by the positive value of ΔH^0 (10.54 kJ mol-1). The adsorption process is fitted with the intra-particle diffusion model, which can be described with external mass transfer, intraparticle diffusion in pores, and equilibrium stage. The adsorption mechanism is proved, which includes the bind of Metal-O-Sb bonds by inner-sphere complex, the embedding of Sb in the intercalation of hydrotalcite, redox between Mn and Sb, and functional groups dependent anchoring effect. The work benefits the understanding of the antimony removal behaviour over the hierarchical microtube@nanosheet hybrids.

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Johannes Lehmann – Soil Science – Amazon.com

2 April, 2022
 


Biochar Market Size Industry Growth, Feasibility and Forecasts by 2026

2 April, 2022
 

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The worldwide biochar market is predicted to be valued at $1,147,715.3 thousand by 2028, surging from $353,863.5 thousand in 2020, at a noteworthy CAGR of 16.1%.

 

COVID-19 Influence on Biochar Market

The coronavirus outbreak has created huge financial disaster attributable to lockdown imposed throughout numerous nations. Nonetheless, the impression of pandemic on biochar market was very much less or negligible as agriculture and associated actions have been purposeful in the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, the uncooked supplies required for biochar manufacturing corresponding to manure and agricultural waste have been simply out there to the biochar producers. The truth is, the function of biochar in mitigating the local weather change and boosting the crop yield has paved the way in which for numerous funding & development alternatives. As an illustration, in 2021, Normal Biocarbon, the know-how platform that gives numerous options for lowering the atmospheric carbon, obtained $2000 funding from three US-based institutes particularly Coastal Enterprises (CEI), Finance Authority of Maine (FAME), and Maine Expertise Institute (MTI). With the assistance of this funding, Normal Biocarbon should buy tools for producing top quality biochar. The high-quality biochar in pure type of carbon can be produced on the former website of the Nice Northern Paper mill in East Millinocket.

 

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International Biochar Market Evaluation

Rising recognition of biochar being carbon damaging and its function in soil modification is driving the biochar market dimension. Biochar is changing into more and more widespread within the agricultural sector as it’s extremely porous which may retain important soil vitamins corresponding to nitrogen, phosphorous, and water. Biochar obtained from numerous feedstock have completely different advantages. As an illustration, biochar produced from manure is wealthy in nutrient content material. The biochar obtained from woody biomass persists over longer time and doesn’t degrade rapidly. In depleted soil with much less vitamins and insufficient water provides, biochar may be extraordinarily helpful. As an illustration, when biochar is utilized in such soil circumstances, its fertility may be improved by retaining the vitamins and water in addition to biochar can sequester carbon in soils. This prevents the discharge of carbon into the ambiance that helps in lowering carbon emissions and helps in attaining sustainability. The appliance of biochar offers rise to more healthy crops that may enhance the air high quality by consuming extra carbon dioxide. Additionally, biochar reduces the necessity for chemical fertilizers thereby sustaining the great soil well being.

 

Nonetheless, the manufacturing of biochar requires kilns the place the temperature of 400-700 C have to be maintained for a number of hours that produces lot of thermal power and emits carbon. As well as, sewage biochar accommodates heavy metals corresponding to zinc, nickel, chromium, and others that are poisonous and trigger soil compaction. These elements are anticipated to hamper the biochar market dimension in the course of the evaluation timeframe.

 

The usage of biochar in filtration, livestock feed, constructing supplies, and in different sectors is estimated to drive large development alternatives. As an illustration, biochar has excessive carbon content material and activated carbon can be utilized for water filtration which is a less expensive answer. In livestock feed, biochar can act as a binding agent in feed that may enhance the animal well being. As well as, in constructing supplies, biochar plaster is thought to offer wonderful insulation together with sound and odor discount. Additionally, mixing biochar with cement, lime, and different components can improve the plaster properties. Furthermore, biochar software has proven large potential in gasoline cell know-how owing to its chemical properties and electrical conductivity.

 

International Biochar Market, Segmentation

The worldwide biochar market is segmented primarily based on feedstock, manufacturing technique, software, and area.

 

Feedstock:

 

The feedstock phase is additional categorized into agricultural waste, animal manure, and others. Amongst these, the agricultural waste sub-segment is anticipated to have a dominant market share and shall surpass $795,990.4 thousand by 2028, with a rise from $240,148.9 thousand in 2020. Agricultural wastes corresponding to rice, wooden, fruit peels, corn, and others are excessive in hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin. Cellulose has excessive tensile energy and has excessive tolerance to degradation. Therefore, the biochar obtained through pyrolysis of agricultural waste is wealthy in cellulose fiber that has an affect on uptake of vitamins corresponding to nitrogen from the soil. This helps in growing the soil fertility by facilitating enhanced adsorptive motion and retention of important vitamins.

 

Manufacturing Methodology:

 

The manufacturing technique phase is additional categorized into pyrolysis, gasification, and others. Amongst these, the pyrolysis sub-segment is anticipated to have a dominant market share and shall surpass $604,285.9 thousand by 2028, with a rise from $180,811.7 thousand in 2020. Pyrolysis course of entails heating the biomass at elevated temperatures within the absence of oxygen. Pyrolysis is easy and cheap know-how that may course of number of feedstocks corresponding to manure, agricultural waste, and others. Pyrolysis course of limits the quantity of waste coming into the landfill and reduces the emission of greenhouse gases in addition to air pollution. The development of pyrolysis plant is fast and simple course of that helps in producing biochar and power from waste.

 

Utility:

 

The appliance phase is additional categorized into agriculture, livestock feed, constructing supplies, and others. Amongst these, the agriculture sub-segment is anticipated to have a dominant market share and shall surpass $496,764.6 thousand by 2028, with a rise from $145,527.3 thousand in 2020. Biochar fertilizer and biochar soil modification are the necessary functions of biochar in agriculture. The usage of biochar as fertilizer will increase the microbial exercise and helps within the retention of soil vitamins. That is majorly owing to excessive porosity and enormous floor space which act as a protected habitat for micro-organisms. Biochar enhances the microbial exercise for higher nutrient uptake by crops. This helps in growing the crop yield. Additionally, biochar helps in disposing the large quantity of manure generated by livestock.

 

Area:

 

The biochar marketplace for the North America area is projected to amass dominant market share in the course of the forecast interval. This area’s market generated a income of $208,425.6 thousand in 2020 and is projected to achieve as much as $667,970.3 thousand by 2028. Rising environmental issues corresponding to emission of dangerous greenhouse gases is main development driving issue. As an illustration, the usage of biochar prevents the emission of dangerous carbon dioxide and reduces the degradation of soil from agricultural actions. The U.S. authorities has acknowledged the significance of biochar in selling soil well being and offering meals safety. Biochar promotes sustainable farming and helps in soil conservation. Biochar retains carbon within the soil and biochar mixes discover vary of software in agriculture farms, gardens, and family functions. It is likely one of the most cheap strategies of eliminating carbon from the ambiance which is estimated to propel the North America biochar market development.

 

Key Gamers within the International Biochar Market

A few of the main biochar market gamers are

 

Together with the corporate profiles of the important thing gamers available in the market, the report contains the Porter’s 5 forces mannequin that provides deep insights into the aggressive atmosphere of the market.

 

Porter’s 5 Forces Evaluation for the International Biochar Market:

Bargaining Energy of Suppliers: The biochar producers are much less more likely to depend upon the suppliers because the uncooked materials required for biochar manufacturing is definitely out there. Uncooked supplies corresponding to manure, agricultural waste, and others can be found at low value. Therefore, suppliers have much less bargaining potential.   Thus, the bargaining energy of suppliers is low.

Bargaining Energy of Consumers: On this market, the focus of consumers is growing steadily owing to the function of biochar in local weather change and sustainable farming. Biochar is produced from biomass and buy amount of biochar is excessive.  Thus, purchaser’s bargaining energy can be average.

Menace of New Entrants: The specter of new entrants is excessive as this market is evolving quickly internationally. The preliminary capital value for organising biochar plant is average, and demand is excessive. Thus, the specter of the brand new entrants is excessive.

Menace of Substitutes: There are not any substitute for biochar as this market is in its improvement stage and know-how is being adopted progressively by the European and Asia-Pacific nations. Thus, the specter of substitutes is low.

Aggressive Rivalry within the Market: The biochar producers are rising quickly internationally particularly in Asia-Pacific nations corresponding to China and Australia. The producers are specializing in growing their manufacturing capability to draw customers. Due to this fact, aggressive rivalry available in the market is excessive.

 

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Comparative Study of Enriched Biogas Bottling Cylinder in the Presence of Distinct Filler at …

2 April, 2022
 

Biogas production is a very retro technology that requires some technological advancement in order to compete with the recent fuel demand. Only biogas is not sufficient it has to be enriched before applying it to recent applications, i.e., mobile and stationary. In stationary applications mainly household or domestic fuel requirement is focussed. Low-pressure high-volume storage of enriched biogas is such an advancement in the biogas sector. Enriched biogas can be compressed under high pressure (200 bar) in order to increase the storage capacity or increase the energy density. To make it fit for domestic usage the enriched biogas must be bottled at low pressure (20 bar). Our work shows a possibility in the same direction, i.e, storing the enriched biogas at low pressures. The appropriate experiments were performed on the storage cylinder in two ways, one is simple compression and in another method, the cylinder was filled with adsorbing material (activated carbons produced from biomass). Three different materials, i.e., activated biochar derived from coconut shell procured from NORIT, pigeon pea stalk, and bamboo biochar developed within the lab at 500 0C temperature in an inert environment, were used as filler for the bottling cylinder. The desired characterization of raw material and biochar was also performed. Permissible results are found during this study showing that activated biochar is best suited as filler for bottling cylinders to store the enriched biogas.

Keyphrases: Adsorbed biogas cylinder, Biochar, Enriched biogas, Pyrolysis, Thermogravimetric analysis and


Biochar addition stabilized soil carbon sequestration by reducing temperature sensitivity of …

2 April, 2022
 

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Fraction Transformation and Sorption Mechanism of Sulfamethoxazole in the Aged Biochar

2 April, 2022
 

China Pharmaceutical University

China Pharmaceutical University

China Pharmaceutical University

affiliation not provided to SSRN

The effects of ageing time, biochar contents, and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) concentrations on the species changes, the persistence, and sorption mechanisms of SMX were investigated. The results showed that the biodegradation of SMX in the biochar-sediment systems was negligible during the experiment ( p >0.05). Both ageing process and biochar could promote the migration of labile fraction or stably-adsorbed fraction to bound-residue fraction or non-extractable fraction, of which biochar had greater impact. However, even ageing for 56 days, k 2 > k 1 , k 4 > k 3 , k 5 > k 6 , indicating that stably-adsorbed and bound-residue SMX still remained release risk even after ageing. The ecological risk would be underestimated if only the bioavailability of the readily extractable fractions of organic contamination was considered in the remediation process. The half-life of readily extractable SMX in the pure sediment and 1.0% biochar-sediment systems was 50.0-65.5 days and 20.0-38.0 days, respectively, indicating its more persistence in biochar-sediment systems. The formation mechanisms of different species SMX in biochar-sediment systems were different, and chemisorption was the dominant sorption mechanism for the non-extractable SMX.

Keywords: Sulfamethoxazole, Biochar, Ageing time, Sediment, Fraction migration

Suggested Citation

Nanjing Medical University
Jiangning
Nanjing, 211166
China

Nanjing Medical University
Jiangning
Nanjing, 211166
China

Nanjing Medical University
Jiangning
Nanjing, 211166
China

No Address Available

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Full article: Modeling of biochar composite briquette reaction in blast furnace

2 April, 2022
 

Registered in England & Wales No. 3099067
5 Howick Place | London | SW1P 1WG


Nickel-loaded shrimp shell biochar enhances batch anaerobic digestion of food waste

2 April, 2022
 

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Effects of organic molecules from biochar-extracted liquor on the growth of rice seedlings.

2 April, 2022
 

Yang E.; Jun Meng.; Haijun Hu.; Dengmiao Cheng.; Changfu Zhu.; Wenfu Chen.

Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 2019;170:338-345

eng

There are many reports indicating that biochar can promote growth; however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of this study was to show that organic molecules from biochar-extracted liquor affect the growth of rice seedlings. In this study, rice seedlings were cultured under water. Agronomic traits and growth-related genes and proteins were used as markers to describe more precisely the effects of biochar on specific growth parameters of rice seedlings. Our results demonstrated that the 3% biochar-extracted liquor amendment clearly promoted growth. The growth-related gene auxin binding protein 1 and its encoded protein were up-regulated. Molecular simulations revealed that 2-acetyl-5-methylfuran from biochar-extracted liquor could interact with auxin binding protein 1 in a similar way to indoleacetic acid binding. The growth of rice seedlings was therefore affected by biochar-extracted liquor, which acted on the ABP1 signalling pathway.

Charcoal/pharmacology*

Furans/pharmacology*

Gene Expression Regulation, Plant

Indoleacetic Acids/metabolism

Oryza/drug effects*

Oryza/growth & development

Plant Growth Regulators/pharmacology

Plant Proteins/genetics

Plant Proteins/metabolism

Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics

Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism

Seedlings/drug effects*

Seedlings/growth & development

Signal Transduction

中南大学湘雅医学院

地址:湖南省长沙市桐梓坡路172号 邮编:410013 电话:0731-82355182


‪Roghayeh Vahedi‬ – ‪Google Scholar‬

2 April, 2022
 


Effects of biochar from different feedstocks on soil nitrogen transformation and …

2 April, 2022
 

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Bruno Fischer presentations – SlideShare

2 April, 2022
 

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Relationships between biochar and soil humic substances | UL – University of Limerick

2 April, 2022
 

University of Limerick
Limerick
V94 T9PX
Ireland

Tel: +353-(0)61-202700

Registered Charity Number 5806

 

© University of Limerick


Physicochemical Properties of Biochar Produced from Goldenrod Plants | HTML – MDPI

2 April, 2022
 

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Non-profit group focuses on water quality in Catherine Lakes and the Channel – bestinau

2 April, 2022
 

Bestinau got that-

A determined group of residents near Antioch plans to adopt a new tactic to improve the quality of two connected lakes.

Friends of Catherine and Channel Lakes, a nonprofit organization founded in 2016, has a detailed lake management plan to reduce pollution and eradicate invasive species in two of Illinois’ northernmost lakes.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        


Runoff containing phosphorus can lead to algal blooms in local lakes.
– Courtesy of Amy Littleton


These are the types

These are the types of “socks” that will be hung from docks and placed strategically in the Catherine and Channel lakes near Antioch to absorb nutrients that cause algal blooms.
– Courtesy of Biochar Now LLC

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Associations & Organizations > United States Biochar Initiative – Biomass Industry Directory

2 April, 2022
 

Interested in purchasing a listing? | Logout

Home > Associations & Organizations

www.biochar-us.org

P: 503-780-8185
F: 503-292-2919

Mailing Address:
5475 Southwest Arrow Wood Lane
Portland, OR 97225

Company Contact:
Thomas Miles
Executive Director
email(“gmail.com”,”usbiochar”);

Non-profit organization promoting the cost effective use of biochar. Biochar is charcoal made from biomass for use in soil. It is used in soil and growing media to hold water, retain nutrients, balance pH, improve soil texture, as a habitat for beneficial microorganisms, and as a filter to capture contaminants for remediation. Non-soil uses include concrete and asphalt. It can be produced as a co-product of biomass energy though pyrolysis, gasification or combustion. Connect with producers, research and users @USBiochar.


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2 April, 2022
 


标签:Biochar – 英国华人论坛

2 April, 2022
 

Zion Research has published a new report titled Biochar (Pyrolysis, Gasification, Hydrothermal and Others Technology) Market for Agriculture, Water rdquo; According to the report, the global biochar marketwas valued at approximately USD 260…英国华人论坛

Global biochar market is expected to reach USD 5.88 billion by 2022, according to a new report by Grand View Research, Inc. Rising consumption of the product in agricultural operations owing to its soil amending abilities will stimulate in…英国华人论坛

This report is an attempt by Transparency Market Research to identify the potentials and growth of biochar market globally. The market segmentation for biochar, as provided in the report include: technology, feedstock, application and geogra…英国华人论坛

Biochar is a solid material that is obtained from the carbonization of biomass. It is added to soil to enhance soil quality and reduce emissions through carbon sequestration. The use of biochar for carbon sequestration is believed to offset…英国华人论坛

China2uk.Com 英国华人论坛 2020 – 2021


Biochar | Marijuana Growing & Cannabis Forum

3 April, 2022
 


Biochar Fertilizer Market Highlighting The Key Driving and Restraining – Materials Handling

3 April, 2022
 

Overview Of Biochar Fertilizer Market

Biochar Fertilizer is an ecologically-friendly fertilizer prepared by adding organic matter and inorganic substances according to the characteristics of different regions, the growth characteristics of different crops and the principle of scientific fertilizatio.

This has brought along several changes in This report also covers the impact of COVID-19 on the global market.

The rising technology in Biochar Fertilizer Market is also depicted in this research report. Summary Factors that are boosting the growth of the market, and giving a positive push to thrive in the global market is explained in detail. The study considers the present scenario of the data center power market and its market dynamics for the period 2022-2028. It covers a detailed overview of several market growth enablers, restraints, and trends. The report offers both the demand and supply aspects of the market. It profiles and examines leading companies and other prominent ones operating in the market.

Get a Sample PDF copy of the report @ https://www.reportsinsights.com/sample/582781

Key Competitors of the Global Biochar Fertilizer Market are: Biogrow Limited, Biochar Farms, Anulekh, GreenBack, Carbon Fertilizer, Global Harvest Organics LLC

Historical data available in the report elaborates on the development of the Biochar Fertilizer on national, regional and international levels. Biochar Fertilizer Market Research Report presents a detailed analysis based on the thorough research of the overall market, particularly on questions that border on the market size, growth scenario, potential opportunities, operation landscape, trend analysis, and competitive analysis.

Major Product Types covered are:
Organic Fertilizer, Inorganic Fertilizer, Compound Fertilizer

The Application Coverage in the Market are:
Cereals, Oil Crops, Fruits and Vegetables, Others

This study report on global Biochar Fertilizer market throws light on the crucial trends and dynamics impacting the development of the market, including the restraints, drivers, and opportunities.

To get this report at a profitable rate.: https://www.reportsinsights.com/discount/582781

The fundamental purpose of Biochar Fertilizer Market report is to provide a correct and strategic analysis of the Biochar Fertilizer industry. The report scrutinizes each segment and sub-segments presents before you a 360-degree view of the said market.

Market Scenario:

The report further highlights the development trends in the global Biochar Fertilizer market. Factors that are driving the market growth and fueling its segments are also analyzed in the report. The report also highlights on its applications, types, deployments, components, developments of this market.

Highlights following key factors:

:- Business description – A detailed description of the company’s operations and business divisions.
:- Corporate strategy – Analyst’s summarization of the company’s business strategy.
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Effects of straw and straw-derived biochar on bacterial diversity in soda saline-alkaline paddy soil

3 April, 2022
 

In order to provide a scientific basis for the improvement of soda saline-alkaline paddy soil, the pot experiment was performed to explore the effects of rice straw and straw-derived biochar on the diversity of soil bacteria and community structure in soda saline-alkaline soil.

The experiment was four gradients of straw return (3 (RS1), 7.5 (RS2), 12 (RS3), and 16.5 (RS4) t/hm2) and four gradients of biochar return (3 (RB1), 7.5 (RB2), 12 (RB3), and 16.5 (RB4) t/hm2), using 0 t/hm2 as a control (CK). After 5 consecutive years of measuring straw returns, high-throughput sequencing was used to determine the relative abundance, alpha diversity, and changes in the community structure of soil bacteria.

Our results demonstrated that straw return significantly increased the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Sphingomonas and significantly reduced the relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Parcubacteria, Anaeromyxobacter, Pontibacter, uncultured_bacterium_f_Draconibacteriaceae, and Bryobacter. Straw-derived biochar return significantly increased the relative abundance of uncultured_bacterium_f_Draconibacteriaceae and significantly reduced the relative abundances of Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Thiobacillus, and Anaeromyxobacter, indicating that both straw and its associated biochar return changed the relative abundance of the phyla and genera of some bacteria. Straw return affected bacteria phylum and genus more than straw-derived biochar. With the exception of the 16.5 t/hm2 straw return, which reduced bacterial richness, the treatments did not significantly impact alpha diversity. Compared with straw-derived biochar return, straw return significantly changed the bacterial community structure, and the higher the straw return, the higher the impact on the bacterial community structure. Redundancy analysis (RDA) demonstrated that there was a significant correlation between the physicochemical properties of the soil and the community structure of its bacteria. A Mantel test demonstrated that the content of available phosphorus, available potassium, and organic matter was all important environmental factors affecting community structure.

We speculate that straw return regulates the physicochemical properties of the soil, which affects the bacterial community structure.

China is a large agricultural country with one of the highest abundances of straw in the world (Zeng et al. 2007). Its straw output is increasing, and the average annual growth rate of straw is approximately 4% over the past few decades (Hong et al. 2016). At present, burning straw is a serious problem because it is a waste of resources, pollutes the environment, and perturbs the ecological balance of farmland. A major research topic is how to use straw resources to develop new industries that provide ecological and environmental protections, save energy and reduce emissions, and develop sustainable agricultural practices. Straw is rich in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other nutrients, so straw return can increase the content of soil organic matter, improve soil fertility (Sommer et al. 2011; Turmel et al. 2014), promote the growth of soil microorganisms (Miura et al. 2016), and increase crop yield (Wang et al. 2015). However, excess straw return negatively impacts crop production and soil quality, such as reducing soil nitrogen levels (Shindo and Nishio 2005) and causing problems with disease and weeds (Su et al. 2016; Tardy et al. 2015) In recent years, a new method of straw return has attracted increasing attention: biochar. Biochar is a type of high-carbon solid material with rich pores and an aromatic hydrocarbon structure that can be generated by subjecting agricultural and forestry waste to high temperatures under low oxygen or anaerobic conditions (Cayuela et al. 2013). Due to the unique physical and chemical properties of biochar, it is widely used in pollutant adsorption and soil quality improvement (Gul et al. 2015; Gunes et al. 2016; Xie et al. 2014).

Microorganisms are responsible for maintaining the stability of a soil’s ecosystem (Gul et al. 2015) and are sensitive to changes in soil properties. As such, they are used to evaluate soil quality (Marschner et al. 2013). As one of the most abundant microbial species in the soil, bacteria play important functional roles in a variety of soil ecological processes, such as decomposing organic matter and promoting the mineralization of soil nutrients (Hamm et al. 2016). Studies showed that both carbonization and straw return increase the number of bacteria, actinomycetes, and physiological microbe flora in the soil (Gu et al. 2016). Biochar is rich in nutrients, and the unique structure can provide a favorable breeding ground for soil bacteria. This makes biochar conducive to bacterial growth, increasing its relative abundance (Rillig et al. 2010). There are numerous studies assessing the effects of straw and biochar return on soil bacteria; however, its impact on bacterial diversity is often closely related to the raw materials, the return levels of straw and biochar, and the soil type. Bai et al. (2020) found that carbonization return can increase the alpha diversity of soil bacteria in sandy loam soil (pH = 8.51), but that straw return has no significant effect on the alpha diversity of soil bacteria. The biochar of wheat and corn stalks return can increase the diversity of weakly acidic rice soil and black soil, respectively (Yao et al. 2017; Zheng et al. 2016). Straw return increased the alpha diversity of bacteria in acidic soil (Bu et al. 2020) but had no significant impact on the alpha diversity of bacteria in alkaline soil (Sun et al. 2015; Yu et al. 2018; Zhang et al. 2021).

The mechanism behind how straw and straw-derived biochar return affect soil bacterial communities is currently unclear. There is little research on how rice straw and carbonization return affect soil bacterial community diversity and structure in soda saline-alkali soil for many years. Therefore, we explored the effects of different amounts of rice straw and its straw-derived biochar on soil bacterial community diversity over several years, providing a theoretical reference for the practical application of straw agriculturalization.

This experiment was performed in the potted experimental fields (26° 10′ N, 119° 23′ E) of Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, from 2014 to 2018. Daqing City is in the northeast semi-humid, semiarid, grassland-meadow saline area. The soil types are primarily soda-alkalized meadow soil, swampy meadow soil, and soda-salinized meadow alkaline soil. The salinization of this soil is accompanied by an alkalization process. The average annual sunshine is 2726 h, the average annual frost-free period is 166 days, the average annual temperature is 4.2 °C, and the average annual summer temperature is 23.2 °C. The daily temperature difference during the growth and development period of crops exceeds 10 °C, the average annual precipitation is 427.5 mm, and the average annual evaporation is 1635 mm. The tested variety was Kenjiandao 5, which had 12 leaves on the main stem, was 87–90 cm in height, and possessed ≥ 10 °C active accumulated temperature of 2450–2500 °C. The test soil was taken from the 0–15 cm soil layer of soda-salinized meadow alkaline soil in Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University in 2014. The physical and chemical properties of the soil are shown in Table 1.

The biochar material, rice straw, was purchased from Liaoning Jinhefu Agricultural Development Co., Ltd. It had pH 9.04 and was comprised of 56.61% carbon, 13.60% nitrogen, and 21.07% ash. We performed a pot experiment, with single factor complete randomized design at nine levels including a control 0 (CK), and annual straw return 3.0 (RS1), 7.5 (RS2), 12 (RS3), and 16.5 (RS4) t/hm2, respectively, and annual straw-derived biochar return 3.0 (RB1), 7.5 (RB2), 12 (RB3), and 16.5 (RB4) t/hm2, respectively. The test was performed three times, with four pots each time. In the spring of the first year, the saline-alkaline soil was dried, crushed, and mixed, after which 12 kg of saline-alkaline soil was mixed with quantitative biochar and 5 cm rice straw, respectively. It was then placed into a pot (height 30.5 cm, inner diameter 30 cm), and the base fertilizer was buried 10 cm deep in the soil layer. Water was added until it stabilized, after which it was stirred. There were four hills per hot and three seedlings per hill. Following the annual harvest, the soil from each pot was maintained in its original state. The next spring, it was crushed and mixed with biochar and straw and returned to the original pot. The amount of biochar and straw and the management measures were the same for each treatment every year, and the biochar and straw were continuously returned for 5 years. The fertilizers applied were urea, ammonium sulfate, diammonium phosphate, and potassium sulfate. The application rates of basal fertilizers N, P, and K were 39.6 (N), 69 (P2O5), and 42 (K2O) kg/hm2, respectively; the application rates of tillering fertilizer and regulating fertilizer N were 28.35 kg/hm2 and 9.35 kg/hm2, respectively, and the application rates of panicle fertilizer N and K were 14.39 (N) and 28.5 (K2O) kg/hm2, respectively.

In mid-June (rice tillering period) of 2018 (the 5th year of continuous straw and biochar return), soil samples from the 0–10 cm soil were collected, with three repetitions for each. Each repetition was a mixture of three samples from each pot of the four pots. Each soil sample was divided into two parts. One part was placed into a sterile airtight bag and was immediately placed in liquid nitrogen, brought back to the laboratory, and stored at −80 °C for subsequent analysis of the soil bacteria diversity. Another part of the sample was air-dried in a dark and ventilated place to remove gravel blocks and plant residues and was passed through a 2-mm sieve to determine the soil nutrient content.

We weighed 0.5 g of a soil sample, used a PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit to perform DNA extraction, and used agarose gel electrophoresis and a spectrophotometer to detect the purity, concentration, and integrity of the DNA. We then amplified the V3 + V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA with primers 338F (5′-ACTCCTACGGGAGGCAGCA-3′) and 806R (5′- GGACTACHVGGGTWTCTAAT-3′). The reaction system for the first step of PCR amplification was 50 μl, and the reaction procedure was as follows: 95 °C pre-denaturation 5 min; 15 cycles (including 95 °C, 1 min; 50°C, 1 min; 72°C, 1 min); 72 °C, 7 min; and kept warm at 4 °C. The PCR product was then purified with magnetic beads. The second reaction was 40 μl, and the reaction procedure was as follows: 98 °C pre-denaturation for 30 s; 10 cycles (including 98 °C, 10 s; 65 °C, 30 s; 72 °C, 30 s); and 72 °C, 5 min. The PCR product of the second step was purified with magnetic beads and then quantified by NanoDrop 2000, and the samples were mixed according to a mass ratio of 1:1. The library was sequenced using the Illumina Hiseq 2500 platform (Illumina Corporation, USA) with a 2 × 250 bp paired-end sequencing strategy. The total DNA extraction and sequencing of soil microorganisms were performed by Beijing Biomarker Biotechnology Co., Ltd.

We used the USEARCH method to cluster the effective tags of each sample, and cluster sequences with 97% sequence similarity were used to generate operational taxonomic units (OTUs). We used Mothur (version v.1.30) software to analyze the alpha diversity of the samples. R software was used to perform principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) of OTU abundance and study the differences in community structure between different treatments. We used redundancy analysis (RDA) to study the relationship between the physicochemical properties of the soil and its microbial community structure. Excel 2003 was used for data sorting, and GraphPad prism 6.02 software was used to complete the drawing. DPS v7.05 software was used for variance analysis, and the Duncan’s test was applied to identify the significance among the various treatments.

The top ten bacterial phyla in relative abundance are Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Ignavibacteriae, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, and Parcubacteria. In this study, we analyzed the bacteria at the phylum level that significantly differed in relative abundance following straw and straw-derived biochar return (Fig. 1). After straw return, the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes first increased and then decreased, with both reaching their maximum in the RS3 treatment, which were 42.28% and 318.25% higher than the control. The relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, and Parcubacteria first decreased and then increased, while the relative abundance of them in RS2 and RS3 treatments was significantly lower than both the control and other treatments. The relative abundance change of Actinobacteria in each treatment was RS4 > RS2 > CK > RS3 > RS1, and that in RS1 treatment was 48% lower than control. Compared with straw return, straw-derived biochar had a smaller effect on the relative abundance of bacterial phyla after returning to the field. The difference in relative abundance between the control and Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, and Parcubacteria was not significant. The relative abundance change of Actinobacteria was RB1 > RB4 > CK > RB2 > RB3, while that in the RB3 treatment was 52% significantly lower than in the control. The relative abundance of Gemmatimonadetes was RB2 > CK > RB1 > RB3 > RB4, where the RB3 and RB4 treatments were 35.97% and 46.05% significantly lower than the control. Based on these analyses, there are differences in the effect of straw and its derived biochar return on the relative abundance of bacterial community at the phylum level.

Effects of different treatments on the relative abundance of bacterial phyla. Different small letters within one column mean significant difference of Duncan multiple range test among different treatments at 5% level. The same as below

We further analyzed bacterial genera that were significantly affected by the straw and its derived biochar return (Fig. 2). The top ten bacterial genera in relative abundance are uncultured bacterium_f_Anaerolineaceae, Thiobacillus, Anaerolinea, Pontibacter, Sphingomonas, Anaeromyxobacter, uncultured_bacterium_f_Draconibacteriaceae, Bryobacter, uncultured_bacterium_f_Blastocaeraceae_[Subgroup_4], and Geobacter. As straw return increased, the relative abundance of Pontibacter, Anaeromyxobacteruncultured_bacterium_f_Blastocaeraceae_[Subgroup_4] and Bryobacter decreased, and their relative abundance was lowest in the RS3 and RS4 treatments, which were 91.70%, 45.90%, 64.84%, and 49.38% lower than the control. The relative abundance changes of Sphingomonas were RS4 > RS2 > RS3 > CK > RS1. The RS4 treatment was 66.67% higher than the control. As the amount of biochar return increased, the relative abundance of Thiobacillus first decreased and then increased and was 24.80% lower in the RB1 treatment than in the control. The relative abundance of uncultured_bacterium_f_Draconibacteriaceae was increased, and that in RB3 and RB4 were 42.97% and 66.41% higher than in the control. Biochar return significantly reduced the relative abundance of Anaeromyxobacter. Our results demonstrate that straw return impacts the relative abundance of bacteria at the phylum and genus level more than biochar does. RS2 and RS3 treatments have a greater impact on the bacteria at the phylum level, RS4 treatment has a greater impact on bacteria at genus level, and the effects of RB3 and RB4 treatments on bacteria at the phylum and genus levels were relatively large.

Effects of different treatments on the relative abundance of bacterial genera

The statistical results of the OTU number and alpha diversity of each treatment at 97% similarity are shown in Table 2. The sample sequencing depth index values all exceed 99.5%, indicating that the sequencing depth includes most types of bacteria in the sample, and the amount of sequencing data was adequate. The number of bacterial OTUs was between 1676 and 1771. The number of OTUs in the RS3 and RS4 treatments was 4.11% and 4.23% lower than in the control, and the difference between the other treatments and the control was not significant. The Chao1 and ACE index were both used to measure the species abundance. The number of species in the RS4 treatment was significantly lower than in the control, though the differences between the other treatments and the control were not significant. We used Simpson and Shannon indexes to measure species diversity. The Shannon index value is inversely proportional to the Simpson index value, indicating higher species diversity in the sample. In this study, the differences between the control and the Simpson and Shannon indexes in each treatment did not reach a significant level, indicating that straw return and carbonization have no significant effect on bacterial alpha diversity.

In order to study the changes of the bacterial community structure after continuous straw and straw-derived biochar return, PCoA analysis was performed based on the OTU level, and the principal coordinate combination with the largest contribution rate was selected (Fig. 3). The first and second principal axes accounted for 44.54% and 9.31%, respectively, of the variation of the bacterial community structure. The distances of the biochar return treatments were closer to the control, indicating that the community structure is similar. Compared with the biochar return treatments, straw return treatments were clearly distinguishable from the control. As the straw return amount increased, the projection distance of each treatment on the PC1 axis from the control increased, indicating that adding straw changed the soil bacterial community structure, and that high level had a more significant impact.

Principal coordinate analysis of different treatments

The soil physicochemical properties and related bacterial genera were analyzed using RDA (Fig. 4), which further clarified the environmental factors that affect the changes in community structure. The relationship between the rays in the figure is represented by the angle: an obtuse angle represents a negative correlation, and an acute angle represents a positive correlation. RDA analysis demonstrated that the eigenvalues of the two main axes were 28.43% and 9.45%, respectively. Sphingomonas, Hydrogenispora, and Lentimicrobium are negatively correlated with TN; Clostridium_sensu_stricto_1 is negatively correlated with TN and AN and positively correlated with other environmental factors; Pontibacter, Bryobacter, and Anaeromyxobacter are positively correlated with TN and are negatively correlated with other environmental factors; Thiobacillus is positively correlated to pH and negatively correlated with other environmental factors; and Anaerolinea and Geobacter are positively correlated to AP, TK, TP, and PH and negatively correlated with other environmental factors. A Mantel test performed on the soil bacterial flora and soil physical and chemical indicators demonstrated that the relationship between the content of OC, AP, AK, and bacterial community structure was reached significant and extremely significant level (Table 3). Of these, the content of AP and AK had the greatest impact on community structure.

Redundancy analysis of bacteria communities and environmental factors of soil. TP, total phosphorus; AK, available potassium; OC, organic matter; AN, available nitrogen; TN, total nitrogen; TK, total potassium; AP, available phosphorus

Straw crops are rich in nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, which are released after returning to the field. This can improve soil fertility and nutrient cycling (Yin et al. 2018), make the soil loose and porous, and improve microbial and enzymatic activities in the soil (Eagle et al. 2000). Similarly, biochar also has a positive impact on the physical, chemical (Peng et al. 2011), and biological properties of the soil (Van et al. 2010), all of which improve soil quality. Our results demonstrate that straw and straw-derived biochar return changed the relative abundance of some bacteria at phylum and genus level. The relative abundance of Proteobacteria was highest for both control and treatments. This is consistent with previously published results, which found Proteobacteria to be the dominant phylum in soil bacteria (Bai et al. 2020; Bu et al. 2020; Song et al. 2019; Su et al. 2020). The relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes increased following straw return. Previous studies demonstrated that Bacteroidetes are important decomposers of hemicellulose and xylan (Maarastawi et al. 2018), which positively affects carbon circulation in the soil. Firmicutes also play an important role in the decomposition of organic matter, working as a carbon cycle-promoting bacteria to promote cellulose degradation (Xu et al. 2019). Combined with our previous research (Li et al. 2021), it shows that straw return can accelerate the decomposition of organic matter and the release of nutrients, effectively strengthening the soil carbon cycle of paddy fields. Previous studies demonstrated that adding biochar reduced the relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes (Su et al. 2020; Sun et al. 2016; Zheng et al. 2016). In this study, straw and carbonization return both reduced the relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes. The relative abundance of Actinobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes in 12.0 t/hm2 treatment of biochar was significantly lower than that in the control. Our previous studies demonstrated that the pH of the 12.0 t/hm2 biochar return treatment was significantly higher compared to the control and other treatments, and that straw return had the same trend (Li et al. 2020, 2021). Straw return reduced the relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Parcubacteria. Acidobacteria mostly belongs to the oligotrophic group (Bergmann et al. 2010), is conducive to growth in low pH soil environments, and is very sensitive to increases in pH (Mao et al. 2012; Wu et al. 2019). Therefore, we speculate that straw and biochar return increased soil pH, inhibiting the growth of some bacterial growth.

The soil bacterial community plays a key role in the process of soil regulation, and the biomass and composition of soil bacteria determine the sustainability of agricultural soils (Segal et al. 2016). Several studies have been conducted on the effects of long-term straw return and carbonization return on the alpha diversity of soil bacteria, but no consensus has yet been reached. Some studies have demonstrated that straw return increased the bacterial alpha diversity of acidic soil (Bu et al. 2020), but did not have a significant impact on alkaline soil diversity (Sun et al. 2015; Yu et al. 2018; Zhang et al. 2021). Returning crop straw biochar to the field increased the bacterial alpha diversity of weakly acidic soils (Yao et al. 2017; Zheng et al. 2016) and reduced the alpha diversity of weakly alkaline soils (Liu et al. 2019). Yin et al. (2021) found that applying peanut shell biochar had no significant effect on the bacterial alpha diversity of tobacco cinnamon soil (pH = 7.10). Bai et al. (2020) found that straw carbonization can increase the alpha diversity of soil bacteria in sandy loam soil (pH = 8.51); however, straw return did not significantly impact it. Additional analysis demonstrated that the primary reasons for the different test results were the use of different raw materials and the return level of straw and biochar, as well as the soil type. The abundance and diversity of microbial communities largely depend on the pH and nutritional status of the soil (Mao et al. 2012; Tao et al. 2017). Bacteria are very sensitive to pH changes; for example, the diversity and richness of bacteria in desert soils (pH > 8.0) and in temperate and tropical forest soils (pH < 4.5) are both lower than that of grassland soil in Minnesota (pH = 6.1) (Lauber et al. 2009). With the exception of the 16.5 t/hm2 straw return treatment, which reduced bacterial abundance, the effects of other treatments on alpha diversity were not significant. This is consistent with the results of Zhang et al. (2021) and Sun et al. (2015). One reason is that the soda saline-alkaline paddy soil used in this study has a relatively high pH. After adding straw and biochar, the pH exceeds 8.0, which inhibits some bacterial growth. The second reason is that adding large amounts of straw and biochar increases the C/N ratio in the soil, meaning there is not enough nitrogen for bacterial activity. This inhibits the growth of some microorganisms in the soil.

Changes in microbial diversity or community structure could have dramatic impacts on ecosystem processes (Prosser 2002). Straw provides energy and nutrients for bacterial growth (Bai et al. 2018) and can redistribute bacterial community composition (Chen et al. 2017). Previous studies demonstrated that long-term straw return can significantly change bacterial community structure (Bu et al. 2020; Navarro-Noya et al. 2013; Yu et al. 2018). We reached similar conclusions in this study: the straw return significantly changed the bacterial community structure of soda saline-alkaline soil over 5 consecutive years, and the level of influence increased commensurate with application increases. Compared with straw return, straw carbonization return had a smaller impact on bacterial community structure, which was similar to the results of previous studies (Jing et al. 2016; Pan et al. 2016). Some studies demonstrated that the primary factor affecting soil bacterial community structure is soil type (Song et al. 2019). Different soil types respond differently to the composition and structure of soil bacterial communities when adding biochar (Liu et al. 2019). The application of biochar primarily affects the microbial community composition of both acidic and sandy soils (Han et al. 2017; Wang et al. 2016). Previous studies have found that adding organic matter can benefit soil microbial biomass, activity, and community structure (Bronick and Lal 2005). After the straw is returned to the field for a long time, the AK, TOC, and AP contents of the soil all affect the bacterial community (Su et al. 2020). In this study, we found that available phosphorus, available potassium, and organic matter content are important environmental factors affecting the structure of the bacterial community. Our previous research demonstrated that the content of available phosphorus, available potassium, and organic matter after straw return is also important environmental factors that affect the structure of the fungal community (Li et al. 2021). Along with previous studies, we can conclude that straw return changes the physicochemical properties of the soil, affects the living environment of soil microorganisms, and induces changes in the structure of the soil microbial community.

Five consecutive years of straw return and straw-derived biochar return have changed the relative abundance of some bacteria at phylum and genus level in soda saline-alkaline paddy soil. The effect of straw return is higher than that of straw-derived biochar return.

Five consecutive years of straw return and straw-derived biochar return have not significantly increased bacterial alpha diversity. Compared with biochar return, straw return significantly changed the bacterial community structure. Available phosphorus, available potassium, and organic matter content are important environmental factors affecting the differences in soil bacterial community structure.

Based on the above analysis, we conclude that straw return regulates the physicochemical properties of the soil, thereby affecting the bacterial community structure.

The datasets used and analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

Not applicable.

This research was funded by National Key R&D Program of China (2018YFD0300104)

This work was carried out in collaboration between all authors. Authors YX and GZ performed the experimental investigation. Authors MF and HZ performed the data curation and the analysis. Corresponding and first author HL designed the study, performed the supervision, the writing—review and the editing, and funding acquisition. Another author GZ performed the writing—review and the editing and the project administration. The author(s) read and approved the final manuscript.

Correspondence to Hongyu Li.

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All the authors have approved the manuscript that is enclosed.

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Received: 09 December 2021

Accepted: 10 March 2022

Published: 03 April 2022

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13213-022-01673-9


Can You Make Biochar With Hardwood Charcoal | LastDropMugs

3 April, 2022
 

Can You Make Biochar With Hardwood Charcoal? A quick biochar can be made from a commercially available hardwood lump charcoal by the name “Cowboy Charcoal” and available at places like Ace Hardware and Lowe’s. You can also easily and cheaply make your own charcoal.

Can you use wood charcoal for biochar? Yes, but don’t. Most charcoal has other ingredients you don’t want, but it is possible to find just plain hardwood charcoal – wood made warm until pretty much only carbon is left. If you do manage to find pure hardwood charcoal, it will cost you a pretty penny. Meanwhile, making biochar is comically easy and near-free.

Is hardwood lump charcoal the same as biochar? One major difference between charcoal and biochar is the temperature at which it is made. Charcoal is made at roughly 400 degrees Celsius whereas biochar is made between 600–1000 Celsius. Making biochar at lower temperatures causes volatiles (smokeyness) to be left behind, which has been found to limit plant growth.

Can you make biochar from charcoal? Biochar is just charcoal, produced by burning organic matter such as wood, grasses, crop residues and manure, under conditions of low oxygen (pyrolysis).

Biochar is a form of horticultural charcoal produced when wood or other organic matter is roasted (not burned) at 660 degrees Fahrenheit.

If you intend to use an area subjected to Isoxaben or Oryzalin Herbicides, add some hardwood charcoal to the soil just before planting. This will serve a two-fold purpose- diluting the herbicides and precluding the potential growth problems for optimum development of plants.

As long as you use an additive-free, wood charcoal, you can use it as fertilizer. The ash contains potash (potassium carbonate), which is nutritious for many plants. Potash can also increase the pH levels in your soil, but depending on what you’re growing, you want to use it sparingly.

Biochar is a type of charcoal that is used for soil amendment. The key difference between biochar and charcoal is that biochar is a type of charcoal that is made via the modern pyrolysis method, whereas charcoal is produced either from the older method or from the modern method.

A quick biochar can be made from a commercially available hardwood lump charcoal by the name “Cowboy Charcoal” and available at places like Ace Hardware and Lowe’s. You can also easily and cheaply make your own charcoal. After crushing, screen the biochar with ¼” hardware cloth.

However, when biochar is applied in the agricultural land, some previous studies highlighted some drawbacks of biochar implementation: (i) loss of land due to erosion, (ii) soil compaction during the application, (iii) risk of contamination, (iv) removal of crop residues, and (vii) reduction in worm life rates.

Fuel wood—often oak, hickory, ash, or maple—was generally stacked in piles and covered with damp earth, lit from the top of the pile, and left to combust and smolder for days. Burning wood slowly and at low temperatures is still one of the least expensive and easiest ways to make charcoal.

As Epic Gardening highlights, in general, you don’t want to use the type of charcoal briquettes designed for backyard barbecues in potted plants or the garden, because they usually contain additives that can be toxic to plants. However, lump charcoal (without additives) can sometimes be used.

You can make biochar at home on a micro scale by digging a trench or hole and putting a mixture of dry wood and dried plant materials such as sweetcorn stalks or perennial weeds and roots into it. Set fire to the material which will initially give off clouds of white smoke.

Using wood ash in home gardens can increase soil fertility and raise soil pH. What are the potential benefits of using wood ash? Wood ash contains nutrients that can be beneficial for plant growth. Calcium is the plant nutrient most commonly found in wood ash and may comprise 20% or more of its content.

Charcoal is often used as a substitute for perlite as it possesses the same functional qualities. Charcoal speeds drainage, inhibits bacteria and fungal development and allows good air flow and is therefore a good option for inclusion in potting medium for a range of plants.

Horticultural charcoal has many positive qualities but, unlike activated charcoal, horticultural charcoal doesn’t have spongy air pockets, so it lacks the ability to absorb odors or toxins.

Mulch does not always have to be made of plant material. Black charcoal covering the soil surface can create a visual effect while reducing moisture evaporation from the soil and preventing weed growth. Use a layer of natural charcoal as a mulch to contrast with light-colored plants.

Once your used charcoal and ash is completely cold, you can throw it away. We recommend wrapping completely in aluminum foil before tossing into a non-combustible outdoor trash receptacle.

Do not use the remains of coal or charcoal around your yard or garden. This isn’t specific to just roses but to all plants in your yard, particularly a vegetable garden. This is for 2 reasons: Discarded coal has a much lower concentrations of nutrients compared to wood ash.

Ash from coal or anthracite should be put in the waste bin since it has little or no nutritional benefit and is potentially harmful to soil, plants and consumers of edible produce. It should not be put in home composting.

Do not spread ashes around acid-loving plants like blueberries, strawberries, azaleas, rhododendrons, camellias, holly, potatoes or parsley. Plants that thrive with a dressing of wood ash include garlic, chives, leeks, lettuces, asparagus and stone-fruit trees.

The ashes are safe to use in the garden, where they provide a nourishing environment for mycorrhizae, which are beneficial soilborne fungi that help a plant’s root system.

Biochar outperforms straw and compost only with regards to sorption. Comparability criteria for experimental studies are recommended (C, N, H, pH, etc.). Constant laboratory conditions often mask amendment effects in soils. DNA sequencing methods are needed to better understand microbial communities.

Our BioActive Carbon is not from activated charcoal. Activated charcoal is a long chain carbon but considered a spent carbon meaning that is like a sponge to bind toxins only in the GI system. The products we use are long and short chain active carbon molecules, which have the ability to support life.

Regular hardwood (grilling) charcoal is typically made using only hardwood scraps and is perfectly safe and beneficial when crushed and added to your garden soil.

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Removal of Atrizine using Rice Husk Biochar: Characteristic and Equilibrium Studies | SpringerLink

3 April, 2022
 

Pesticides in aqua bodies resulting from drainage of industrial pollutants are the most potential environmental concerns, and their elimination is critical. Atrazine is a broad-leaf herbicide that is widely used around the world. Atrizine, on the other hand, is frequently found in water sources as a result of its long-term use. Biochar has proven potential for sorption of atrazine from solution considering the number and type of functional groups found on it. Adsorption experiments to remove atrizine from water bodies using rice husk biochar as an adsorbent are discussed in this work. Elemental analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) analyzer were used to determine the activation and surface properties of rice husk biochar. For different pesticide concentrations, the effect of contact time on adsorption ability and percentage removal was investigated.

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Correspondence to Vijetha Ponnam.

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Received: 11 December 2021

Accepted: 07 March 2022

Published: 02 April 2022

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40033-022-00345-x

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Predicting methane emissions from paddy rice soils under biochar and nitrogen addition …

3 April, 2022
 

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Fresh biomass derived biochar with high-load zero-valent iron prepared in one step for …

3 April, 2022
 

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Effects of biochar and dicyandiamide combination on nitrous oxide emissions from Camellia …

3 April, 2022
 

Climate Change Data Portal

Greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils contribute substantially to global atmospheric composition. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one important greenhouse gas induces global warming. Nitrification inhibitors (NI) or biochar can be effective soil N2O emission mitigation strategies for agricultural soils. However, due to differences in crop physiological traits or agricultural management, the effectiveness of mitigation strategies varies among agricultural systems. Camellia oleifera is a woody oil plant widely grown and requires intensive N input, which will potentially increase N2O emissions. Thereby, mitigation of N2O emissions from C. oleifera field soil is vital for sustainable C. oleifera development. Besides NI, incorporation of C. oleifera fruit shell-derived biochar into its soil will benefit waste management and simultaneous mitigation of N2O emissions but this has not been investigated. Here, we conducted two studies to examine effects of biochar addition and NI (dicyandiamide, DCD) application on N2O emissions from C. oleifera field soil with different N (urea or NH4NO3) and incubation temperatures. Biochar effects on nitrification rates varied among N treatments. Biochar applied in combination with DCD further reduced nitrification rates (for urea treatment, decreased from 1.1 to 0.3mgkg(-1)day(-1)). Biochar addition consistently increased soil N2O emissions (for urea treatment, increased from 0.03 to 0.08ngg(-1)h(-1)) and their temperature sensitivity. DCD application reduced soil N2O emissions with greater reductions with urea application. In future cultivation of intensively managed C. oleifera gardens, NI should be applied to mitigate N2O emissions if biochar is added, especially when urea is used.


Cattle manure biochar offset earthworm greenhouse gas emissions in forest soil

3 April, 2022
 

IMAGE: THE EFFECT OF CATTLE MANURE BIOCHAR AND EARTHWORM ADDITION TOWARD CO2 AND NO2 EMISSION IN AGROCULTURAL AND FOREST SOILS.

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Biochar as an Eco-Friendly and Economical Adsorbent for the Removal of Colorants (Dyes …

3 April, 2022
 

Dyes (colorants) are used in many industrial applications, and effluents of several industries contain toxic dyes. Dyes exhibit toxicity to humans, aquatic organisms, and the environment. Therefore, dyes containing wastewater must be properly treated before discharging to the surrounding water bodies. Among several water treatment technologies, adsorption is the most preferred technique to sequester dyes from water bodies. Many studies have reported the removal of dyes from wastewater using biochar produced from different biomass, e.g., algae and plant biomass, forest, and domestic residues, animal waste, sewage sludge, etc. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the application of biochar as an eco-friendly and economical adsorbent to remove toxic colorants (dyes) from the aqueous environment. This review highlights the routes of biochar production, such as hydrothermal carbonization, pyrolysis, and hydrothermal liquefaction. Biochar as an adsorbent possesses numerous advantages, such as being eco-friendly, low-cost, and easy to use; various precursors are available in abundance to be converted into biochar, it also has recyclability potential and higher adsorption capacity than other conventional adsorbents. From the literature review, it is clear that biochar is a vital candidate for removal of dyes from wastewater with adsorption capacity of above 80%.

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Biochar Fine Granules Market Outlook 2022 Analysis By Leading Keyplayers – Business Merseyside

4 April, 2022
 

New Jersey, USA,-Biochar Fine Granules Market reports study a variety of parameters such as raw materials, costs, and technology, and consumer preferences. It also provides important market credentials such as history, various extensions and trends, trade overview, regional markets, trade and market competitors.Biochar Fine Granules Market Report Based on market share analysis of major manufacturers The Biochar Fine Granules Market Report covers business-specific capital, revenue, and price analysis, along with other sections such as expansion plans, support areas, products offered by major manufacturers, alliances, and acquisitions. Home office delivery.

The full profile of the company is mentioned. It also includes capacity, production, price, revenue, cost, gross profit, gross profit, sales volume, sales revenue, consumption, growth rate, import, export, supply, future strategy and the technology development they are creating. Report. Biochar Fine Granules market historical and forecast data from 2022 to 2030.

Get | Download Sample Copy with TOC, Graphs & List of Figures@ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/download-sample/?rid=468092

The Biochar Fine Granules Market Research Report study covers global and regional markets with an in-depth analysis of the overall growth prospects of the market. It also illuminates the comprehensive competitive environment of the global market with a forecast period of 2022-2030. Along with the forecast period 2022-2030, the Biochar Fine Granules Market Research report provides an additional dashboard overview of key companies covering successful marketing strategies, market contributions, and recent developments in both historical and current situations. Biochar Fine Granules Market Research Report is highly research-intensive driven by high R&D investment and has strong product analysis to maintain growth and ensure long-term monetization with forecast period 2022-2030.

The major players covered in Biochar Fine Granules Markets:

Biochar Fine Granules Market Breakdown by Type:

Biochar Fine Granules Market breakdown by application:

The Biochar Fine Granules market report has been separated according to separate categories, such as product type, application, end-user, and region. Each segment is evaluated on the basis of CAGR, share, and growth potential. In the regional analysis, the report highlights the prospective region, which is expected to generate opportunities in the global Biochar Fine Granuless market in the coming years. This segmental analysis will surely prove to be a useful tool for readers, stakeholders and market participants in order to get a complete picture of the global Biochar Fine Granuless market and its growth potential in the coming years.

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Biochar Fine Granules Market Report Scope 

Regional market analysis Biochar Fine Granules can be represented as follows:

Each regional Biochar Fine Granules sector is carefully studied to understand its current and future growth scenarios. This helps players to strengthen their position. Use market research to get a better perspective and understanding of the market and target audience and ensure you stay ahead of the competition.

The base of geography, the world market of Biochar Fine Granules has segmented as follows:


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Biochar Fertilizer Market | edocr

4 April, 2022
 

This site uses cookies, including third-party cookies, that help us to provide and improve our services. Read More I Agree Home / Report / Biochar Fertilizer Market Need immediate assistance? Call +44 (0) 20 3287 4268 Or Contact Us Insights About Us Industry Media Biochar Fertilizer Market By Product Type (Organic, Inorganic, Compound), Application (Animal Feed, Agriculture, Fish farming) & Region – Forecast to 2020 – 2030 Biochar Fertilizer Market – Analysis, Outlook, Growth, Trends, Forecasts May 2020 | REP-GB-11606 | 200 pages | Food and Beverage View ToC Request Sample Buy Report BIOCHAR FERTILIZER MARKET – KEY RESEARCH FINDINGS The biochar fertilizer market will exhibit a CAGR of 14.5% between 2020 and 2030 Both organic fertilizer and inorganic fertilizer are likely to be in high demand, enabling both categories to account for the maximum share in the market By application, gardening and agriculture application are anticipated to remain frontrunners Expansion of agricultural sector in organic and compound segments in developing economies and the launch of advanced and organic products and technologies are expected to create growth opportunities for biochar fertilizer market North America is anticipated to exhibit considerably high demand for biochar fertilizer during the forecast period KEY FACTORS SHAPING THE BIOCHAR FERTILIZER MARKET Increasing Use of Biochar Fertilizer in Soil amendment The effect of using biochar on soil relies on regional conditions including soil type, soil (depleted or healthy), temperature, and humidity. The pyrolysis of biomass residue extracted from agricultural or forest provides biofuel. Biochar is a by-product of pyrolysis that can be used to fertilize farms to improve their fertility and stability. Using biochar fertilizers has resulted in remarkable improvement in tropical soils, improving soil fertility and plant disease resistance. Rising Demand from Food Sector Boosts Growth Due to rapid growth of urbanization, hectic and busy life style and conservative supp


IPCC warns food systems must deliver decisive low-carbon shift – AgriCensus

4 April, 2022
 

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Countries, companies and individuals need to do much more to slash greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture, farming and forestry if these sectors are to play a meaningful role in slowing down the pace of climate change, the UN’s climate science panel warned on Monday.

The urgings are a depressingly familiar echo from previous reports from the International Panel on Climate Change, and the sense of urgency has grown even more shrill as the planet’s population nears 8 billion and demand for key food crops such as soybean and protein soars, driving up demand for farmland and carbon-intensive fertiliser.  

“Agriculture provides the second-largest share of the mitigation potential… from cropland and grassland soil carbon management, agroforestry, use of biochar, improved rice cultivation, and livestock and nutrient management,” the IPCC said in its report on mitigation strategies to slow the pace of climate change which is intended to inform national policies.

The report said these measures could reduce global greenhouse emissions by 4.1 gigatonnes (Gt) carbon dioxide-equivalent between now and 2050, compared with estimated global emissions of 59 Gt in 2019 when land-use changes are taken into account.

The UN climate science report said demand-side measures, such as shifting to sustainable healthy diets, reductions in food waste, building with wood, and the use of biochemicals, and bio-textiles, had a combined mitigation potential of 2.2 GtCO2-eq year.

“Most mitigation options are available and ready to deploy,” the report said, but the UN’s wider message in the report was that there must be “rapid, deep and immediate” cuts in GHG emissions, while global emissions of CO2 across all major economic sectors would need to peak within three years to ward off the worst impacts of climate change.

Removal of carbon from the atmosphere on a mass scale will be required to reduce GHG emissions below the threshold of a 1.5C temperature rise, the IPCC said, warning that based on currently-pledged mitigation measures, the planet is on course for a 3.2C rise in average global temperatures, an increase that would render much of the world’s land as uninhabitable.  

The report said polices aimed at reducing emissions from farming and land-use change had largely failed so far, and would require much stronger governance, institutions, long-term and consistent execution of mitigation measures, as well as specific policy setting.

The report noted that so far, $0.7-1.44 billion per year has been spent on GHG mitigation from agriculture and land use, well short of the more than $400 billion year that is estimated to be necessary to deliver up to 30% of the global mitigation effort estimated as necessary to keep the world within the lesser magnitude of climate change.

“This estimate of the global funding requirement is smaller than current subsidies provided to agriculture and forestry. A gradual redirection of existing agriculture and forestry subsidies would greatly advance mitigation,” the report said.

The IPCC said it estimated that absolute GHG emissions from food systems had risen from 14 to 17 GtCO2-eq year in the period 1990-2018.

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IPCC says the tools to stop catastrophic climate change are in our hands. Here's how to use them

4 April, 2022
 

Humanity still has time to arrest catastrophic global warming – and has the tools to do so quickly and cheaply, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has found.

The latest IPCC assessment report, the world’s definitive stocktake of action to minimise climate change, shows a viable path to halving global emissions by 2030.

This outlook is much more favourable than in earlier assessments, made possible by tremendous reductions in the cost of clean energy technologies.

But broad policy action is needed to make steep emissions reductions happen.

We each contributed expertise to the report. In this article, we highlight how the world can best reduce emissions this decade and discuss the potential implications for Australia.

Frank Jotzo, lead author on policies and institutions

The IPCC identifies clean electricity and agriculture/forestry/land use as the sectors where the greatest emissions reductions can be achieved, followed by industry and transport.

Further low-emissions opportunities exist in other areas of production, buildings and the urban sector, as well as shifts in consumer demand.

Overall, half the options to cut emissions by 50 per cent cost less than $US20 a tonne.

The IPCC does not provide a country-level assessment, but it is clear Australia has all these opportunities.

The transition to zero-emissions electricity is well under way.

Decarbonising industry and transport is a next step.

Emerging technologies such as green steel and hydrogen offer Australia new, clean export industries. Fossil fuel use in turn is destined to fall, with coal dropping off particularly quickly.

And Australia’s large land mass provides massive opportunities to remove CO₂ from the atmosphere through plants – and in future, perhaps also through chemical methods.

The IPCC says comprehensive policy packages are needed to make deep emissions cuts happen.

It finds carbon taxes and emissions trading schemes have been effective, alongside targeted regulation and other instruments – such as support for research and development, uptake of advanced technologies and removing fossil fuel subsidies.

The report also emphasises the need for continued technological innovation, and to greatly scale up finance for climate action.

It puts weight on the importance of equity, sustainable development and comprehensive engagement across society to avert unmanageable climate change.

That requires climate action to take centre stage in society, involving all manner of groups. Independent institutions such as Australia’s Climate Change Authority have a strong role to play, and business should be actively involved.

So what’s the IPCC’s overriding message? The world’s governments must go all in on addressing climate change. The opportunities are there and the toolkit is ready.

Annette Cowie, lead author on cross-sectoral perspectives

To have our best shot at holding warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, the world must hit net-zero emissions by mid-century.

Agriculture is a big contributor to global emissions.

But the IPCC confirms the land also has a central role in getting to net zero through measures that remove CO₂ from the atmosphere and store it, such as tree planting, soil carbon management and the use of biochar.

Benefits returned to farmers include improved soil fertility and income from carbon trading.

The way we produce and distribute food accounts for more than one-third of global emissions.

The report says one of the biggest individual contributions we can make to reducing emissions is adopting a sustainable, healthy diet and reducing food waste.

Such a diet is rich in plant-based food, with moderate intake of meat and dairy.

We can also tackle direct emissions from food production. Manure can be made into biogas and feed additives offer promising ways to reduce livestock methane.

Peter Newman, co-ordinating lead author on transport

Jake Whitehead, lead author on transport

A set of technological solutions now exist to reduce emissions across energy, buildings, cities, transport and to a large extent, industry.

They include solar and wind-based power – now the cheapest form of electricity. They also include batteries and storage, electrified transport and “smart” technology that integrates these measures into zero-emissions solutions.

The IPCC report shows in the past decade, unit costs for solar have fallen by 8 per cent, wind by 55 per cent and batteries by 85 per cent. Never before has the world had such an opportunity to decarbonise.

In recent decades, transport has been the laggard in emissions reduction.

But, as the IPCC finds, technologies now exist to change the trajectory. Solar-powered electrification is rolling out for cars, bikes, scooters, buses and trucks.

Continuing advances in battery and charging technologies could enable the electrification of long-haul trucks, including electrified highways.

The IPCC assessed 60 actions individuals can take to reduce emissions.

The largest contributions come from walking and cycling, using electrified transport, reducing air travel, as well as shifting towards plant-based diets.

This highlights how our individual choices matter.

Technology alone is not enough to reduce transport emissions.

Cities must become more oriented toward public transport, walking and cycling. Effective new ways of doing this include on-demand shuttles, trackless trams and high-speed rail.

Governments should provide incentives to supply and use electric scooters, bikes, cars, trucks and buses. This would ensure individuals and businesses who want to reduce their emissions have ways to do so.

The IPCC says cheap green hydrogen will be important to decarbonise aviation, shipping and parts of industry and agriculture. Much work is required in the next decade to bring this solution to fruition.

While government funding is vital to decarbonise transport, this transition also presents significant economic opportunities.

Australia could support transport decarbonisation globally through the mining of critical minerals, as well as the manufacturing, reuse and recycling of electric vehicles.

Huge untapped potential exists to reduce global emissions quickly.

But the window of opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to safe levels is closing at an alarming rate.

As the IPCC shows, fundamental change to both production and demand is required.

Clearly, business as usual is no longer tenable. The IPCC makes one thing patently evident: The time for action is well and truly upon us.

 

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Bioremediation Potential of Bacteria and Rice Husk Biochar for Cadmium and Lead in Wastewater

4 April, 2022
 

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Biochar Market Giants Spending Is Going To Boom | Airex Energy, Diacarbon Energy … – Spooool.ie

4 April, 2022
 

The latest study released on the Global Biochar Market by AMA Research evaluates market size, trend, and forecast to 2027. The Biochar market study covers significant research data and proofs to be a handy resource document for managers, analysts, industry experts and other key people to have ready-to-access and self-analyzed study to help understand market trends, growth drivers, opportunities and upcoming challenges and about the competitors.

Key Players in This Report Include:

Airex Energy (Canada), Diacarbon Energy (Canada), Pacific Pyrolysis (Australia), Phoenix Energy (New York), Biochar Supreme (United States), Cool Planet Energy System (United States), Agri-Tech Producers (United States), Carbon Gold (United Kingdom)

Download Sample Report PDF (Including Full TOC, Table & Figures) @ https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/sample-report/72737-global-biochar-market-1

Definition:

The global Biochar market is expected to witness high demand in the forecasted period due to the upsurging demand for organic farming. Biochar is usually formed when biomass like wood leaves or manure are heated or burned in the presence of oxygen. They are usually formed by a process called pyrolysis and are widely used to improve the quality of the soil and mitigate climate change. Biochar Market can be an important tool to increase food security and cropland diversity in areas with severely depleted soils, hardly organic resources, and inefficient water and chemical fertilizer supplies.  An increase in the use of biochar to enhance soil fertility and crop yields, as well as waste management ability, is also driving the Biochar Market for biochar.

Market Trends:

The Growing  Consumption of Biochar in Livestock Feed

Increasing Environmental Concern among the Population

Market Drivers:

Increasing Usage of Biochar in Energy Production and Greenhouse Gas Remediation

Raising Awareness about the Benefits of Biochar among the Population

Market Opportunities:

Increasing Applications in Energy Production

The Increasing Greenhouse Gas Remediation

The Global Biochar Market segments and Market Data Break Down are illuminated below:

by Application (Agriculture (Livestock, Farming, Others), Gardening, Household, Electricity Generation, Others), Technology Analysis (Pyrolysis, Gasification, Batch Pyrolysis Kiln, Microwave Pyrolysis, Cookstove, Others), Feedstock Type (Woody Biomass, Agricultural Waste, Animal Manure, Others)

Global Biochar market report highlights information regarding the current and future industry trends, growth patterns, as well as it offers business strategies to help the stakeholders in making sound decisions that may help to ensure the profit trajectory over the forecast years.

Have a query? Market an enquiry before purchase @ https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/enquiry-before-buy/72737-global-biochar-market-1

Geographically, the detailed analysis of consumption, revenue, market share, and growth rate of the following regions:

Objectives of the Report

Buy Complete Assessment of Biochar market Now @  https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/buy-now?format=1&report=72737

Points Covered in Table of Content of Global Biochar Market:

Chapter 01 – Biochar Executive Summary

Chapter 02 – Market Overview

Chapter 03 – Key Success Factors

Chapter 04 – Covid-19 Crisis Analysis on Global Biochar Market

Chapter 05 – Global Biochar Market – Pricing Analysis

Chapter 06 – Global Biochar Market Background

Chapter 07 — Global Biochar Market Segmentation

Chapter 08 – Key and Emerging Countries Analysis in Global Biochar Market

Chapter 09 – Global Biochar Market Structure Analysis

Chapter 10 – Global Biochar Market Competitive Analysis

Chapter 11 – Assumptions and Acronyms

Chapter 12 – Biochar Market Research Methodology

Browse Complete Summary and Table of Content @ https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/reports/72737-global-biochar-market-1

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US Activin A Market Set to Register healthy CAGR During 2022-2028 – ChattTenn Sports

4 April, 2022
 

Activin A Market Overview 2022

This has brought along several changes in This report also covers the impact of COVID-19 on the global market.

The report offers detailed coverage of Activin A industry and main market trends. The market research includes historical and forecast market data, demand, application details, price trends, and company shares of the leading Activin A by geography. The report splits the market size, by volume and value, on the basis of application type and geography.

The Top key vendors in Activin A Market include are:- Japan SLC, IBL, Ajinomoto, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Sigma-Aldrich, STEMCELL, PeproTech

Get a Sample PDF copy of this Activin A Market Report @ https://www.reportsinsights.com/sample/580729 

This research report categorizes the global Activin A market by top players/brands, region, type and end user. This report also studies the global Activin A market status, competition landscape, market share, growth rate, future trends, market drivers, opportunities and challenges, sales channels and distributors.

Major Product Types covered are:
IL-4
GM-CSF

The Application Coverage in the Market are:
Human
Animal

Region wise performance of the Activin A industry 

This report studies the global Activin A market status and forecast, categorizes the global Cable Conduits market size (value & volume) by key players, type, application, and region. This report focuses on the top players in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia India and Other regions (Middle East & Africa, Central & South America).

To get this report at a profitable rate.: https://www.reportsinsights.com/discount/580729

The study objectives of this report are:

Scope of the Report:- 

The report scope combines a detailed research of Global Activin A Market 2022 with the apprehension given in the advancement of the industry in certain regions.

The Top Companies Report is designed to contribute our buyers with a snapshot of the industry’s most influential players. Besides, information on the performance of different companies, profit, gross margin, strategic initiative and more are presented through various resources such as tables, charts, and info graphic.

Access full Report Description, TOC, Table of Figure, Chart, etc. @   https://www.reportsinsights.com/industry-forecast/activin-a-market-580729

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Reports Insights is the leading research industry that offers contextual and data-centric research services to its customers across the globe. The firm assists its clients to strategize business policies and accomplish sustainable growth in their respective market domain. The industry provides consulting services, syndicated research reports, and customized research reports.

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IPCC says the tools to stop catastrophic climate change are in our hands. Here's how to use them

4 April, 2022
 

Frank Jotzo is a professor at ANU Crawford School of Public Policy and the ANU Institute for Climate Energy & Disaster Solutions. He is a lead author and contributor to the Summary for Policymakers of the IPCC 6th Assessment Report, and a lead author of the 5th Assessment Report. He has led research projects funded by a variety of funders; none present a conflict of interest on this topic. The Australian government provided funding to support IPCC related activities, while the author's (and all authors') activities for the IPCC are not remunerated.

Annette Cowie is a Senior Principal Research Scientist in the climate branch at the NSW Department of Primary Industries, in a addition to her UNE role. She receives research funding from NSW and Commonwealth government programs and rural research and development corporations. She is a member of Soil Science Australia and an adviser to the Australia New Zealand Biochar Industry Group and the Land Degradation Neutrality Fund.

Dr Jake Whitehead is on unpaid leave from his role as a Research Fellow at The University of Queensland. He is a Lead Author of the AR6 Transport Chapter for The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a Member of the International Electric Vehicle Policy Council, and Director of Transmobility Consulting. He has previously received government funding for several sustainable transport projects, including research on both hydrogen and electric vehicles. He is also holds a part-time position as the Head of Policy at the Electric Vehicle Council.

Peter Newman AO is Professor of Sustainability at Curtin University and has been involved in IPCC reports for the past ten years. The Federal Government has provided travel funds for meetings though the past few years have all been on-line. Like all authors in IPCC this is a voluntary activity.

View all partners

Humanity still has time to arrest catastrophic global warming – and has the tools to do so quickly and cheaply, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has found.

The latest IPCC assessment report, the world’s definitive stocktake of action to minimise climate change, shows a viable path to halving global emissions by 2030.

This outlook is much more favourable than in earlier assessments, made possible by tremendous reductions in the cost of clean energy technologies. But broad policy action is needed to make steep emissions reductions happen.

We each contributed expertise to the report. In this article, we highlight how the world can best reduce emissions this decade and discuss the potential implications for Australia.

letters on blocks reading climate change/chance

The IPCC identifies clean electricity and agriculture/forestry/land use as the sectors where the greatest emissions reductions can be achieved, followed by industry and transport.

Further low-emissions opportunities exist in other areas of production, buildings and the urban sector, as well as shifts in consumer demand. Overall, half the options to cut emissions by 50% cost less than US$20 a tonne.

While the IPCC does not provide a country-level assessment, it is clear Australia has all these opportunities.

The transition to zero-emissions electricity is well underway. Decarbonising industry and transport is a next step. Emerging technologies such as green steel and hydrogen offer Australia new, clean export industries. Fossil fuel use in turn is destined to fall, with coal dropping off particularly quickly.

And Australia’s large land mass provides massive opportunities to remove CO₂ from the atmosphere through plants – and in future, perhaps also through chemical methods.

The IPCC says comprehensive policy packages are needed to make deep emissions cuts happen.

Read more: IPCC finds the world has its best chance yet to slash emissions – if it seizes the opportunity

It finds carbon taxes and emissions trading schemes have been effective, alongside targeted regulation and other instruments – such as support for research and development, uptake of advanced technologies and removing fossil fuel subsidies.

The report also emphasises the need for continued technological innovation, and to greatly scale up finance for climate action.

It puts weight on the importance of equity, sustainable development and comprehensive engagement across society to avert unmanageable climate change.

That requires climate action to take centre stage in society, involving all manner of groups. Independent institutions such as Australia’s Climate Change Authority have a strong role to play, and business should be actively involved.

So what’s the IPCC’s overriding message? The world’s governments must go all-in on addressing climate change. The opportunities are there and the toolkit is ready.

industrial scene at sunset

To have our best shot at holding warming to 1.5℃, the world must hit net-zero emissions by mid-century.

Agriculture is a big contributor to global emissions. But the IPCC confirms the land also has a central role in getting to net-zero through measures that remove CO₂ from the atmosphere and store it, such as tree planting, soil carbon management and the use of biochar.

Benefits returned to farmers include improved soil fertility and income from carbon trading.

The way we produce and distribute food accounts for more than one-third of global emissions.

The report says one of the biggest individual contributions we can make to reducing emissions is adopting a sustainable, healthy diet and reducing food waste. Such a diet is rich in plant-based food, with moderate intake of meat and dairy.

We can also tackle direct emissions from food production. Manure can be made into biogas and feed additives offer promising ways to reduce livestock methane.

Read more: The Morrison government wants to suck CO₂ out of the atmosphere. Here are 7 ways to do it

hand holding biochar

Peter Newman, coordinating lead author on transport

Jake Whitehead, lead author on transport

A set of technological solutions now exist to reduce emissions across energy, buildings, cities, transport and to a large extent, industry.

They include solar and wind-based power – now the cheapest form of electricity. They also include batteries and storage, electrified transport and “smart” technology that integrates these measures into zero-emissions solutions.

The IPCC report shows in the past decade, unit costs for solar have fallen by 85%, wind by 55% and batteries by 85%. Never before has the world had such an opportunity to decarbonise.

In recent decades, transport has been the laggard in emissions reduction. But, as the IPCC finds, technologies now exist to change the trajectory. Solar-powered electrification is rolling out for cars, bikes, scooters, buses and trucks.

Continuing advances in battery and charging technologies could enable the electrification of long-haul trucks, including electrified highways.

The IPCC assessed 60 actions individuals can take to reduce emissions. The largest contributions come from walking and cycling, using electrified transport, reducing air travel, as well as shifting towards plant-based diets.

This highlights how our individual choices matter.

Read more: Thinking of buying an electric vehicle for your next car? Here’s the market outlook and what to consider

Technology alone is not enough to reduce transport emissions. Cities must become more oriented toward public transport, walking and cycling. Effective new ways of doing this include on-demand shuttles, trackless trams and high speed rail.

Governments should provide incentives to supply and use electric scooters, bikes, cars, trucks and buses. This would ensure individuals and businesses who want to reduce their emissions have ways to do so.

The IPCC says cheap green hydrogen will be important to decarbonise aviation, shipping and parts of industry and agriculture. Much work is required in the next decade to bring this solution to fruition.

While government funding is vital to decarbonise transport, this transition also presents significant economic opportunities.

Australia could support transport decarbonisation globally through the mining of critical minerals, as well as the manufacturing, reuse and recycling of electric vehicles.

people cycling and walking

Huge untapped potential exists to reduce global emissions quickly.

But the window of opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to safe levels is closing at an alarming rate. As the IPCC shows, fundamental change to both production and demand is required.

Clearly, business-as-usual is no longer tenable. The IPCC makes one thing patently evident: the time for action is well and truly upon us.

Arunima Malik, Glen Peters, Jacqueline Peel, Thomas Wiedmann and Xuemei Bai contributed to this article. See part one of the article here.

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058-Biochar Basics and More: Digging Deeper Into the Science of Soil – Spreaker

4 April, 2022
 

3 years ago #bed, #compost, #composting, #design, #farming, #food, #garden, #gardening, #growing, #homesteading, #horticulture, #landscaping, #organic, #permiculture, #raised, #small, #vegetable


Post-doctoral position (M/F) – pyrolyse de digestats issus de la méthanisation de plantes invasives

4 April, 2022
 

Assurez-vous que votre profil candidat soit correctement renseigné avant de postuler. Les informations de votre profil complètent celles associées à chaque candidature. Afin d’augmenter votre visibilité sur notre Portail Emploi et ainsi permettre aux recruteurs de consulter votre profil candidat, vous avez la possibilité de déposer votre CV dans notre CVThèque en un clic !

Reference : UMR7361-SIMBEN-007
Workplace : MULHOUSE
Date of publication : Monday, April 4, 2022
Type of Contract : FTC Technical / Administrative
Contract Period : 12 months
Expected date of employment : 1 September 2022
Proportion of work : Full time
Remuneration : from 2690.43€ to 3099.75€ gross monthly (according to experience, for an experience of less than 2 years)
Desired level of education : Engineer
Experience required : 1 to 4 years

The research project concerns the establishment of a research and development strategy for the development, characterization and study of carbonaceous materials (biochars). The objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the production of biochar from digestates and its effectiveness in agricultural applications.
The study will focus on the understanding of the impact of process parameters and the nature of the biomass used on the quality of biochars produced on a semi-industrial scale. The characterization results obtained will be compared with those of small-scale biochars produced under stationary operating conditions, so as to calibrate the operating parameters of the pilot unit according to the defined quality of the biochars.

Four main objectives were identified:
– Characterisation of dry digestates: The objective of this part of the project is to acquire a good knowledge of the composition of the selected digestates, in order to correlate it with the final composition and properties of the biochars obtained by pyrolysis under different conditions.
– Optimization of biochar development parameters from methanation digestates: In this second step, the target is the determination of optimal parameters for the production of biochars from methanization digestates by using thermogravimetry under nitrogen flow. The results will be compared with data from the bibliography. The objective is to be able to verify that the biochars obtained present physicochemical characteristics adapted for soil amendment.
– Characterize the different biochars (elemental analyses, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray spectrometry, nitrogen and carbon dioxide adsorption manometry, Raman spectroscopy)
– Production of biochars on a pilot unit: this task is dedicated to the production of biochars on a pilot unit that can process up to 15 kg of dry matter per hour. The objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of industrial production of biochars from digestates with controlled quality and properties.

The post-doctoral researcher will have all the characterization techniques available on the platform at the IS2M and technical means dedicated to the project (industrial pyrolyser for the preparation of biochars) to successfully carry out his/her research.
Finally, this project, based on the optimization of the biomass recovery process by pyrolysis will enable the researcher to develop complementary and formative scientific and technological skills for the future professional integration.

– Initial training and knowledge in industrial processes and analytical techniques
– Experience in applied R&D , systems understanding
– Mastery the techniques of characterization of solid materials;
– One/more research project management experiences would be appreciated
– Writing articles for international journals and mastering the submission and peer-review process.
– Dynamism and autonomy, ability to work in a team environment, ability to coach
– Fluency in written and oral English and French (mandatory) – Level B2 minimum

The workplace is the Institute of Materials Science of Mulhouse (IS2M), it counts 160 personnel staff and 11 technical platforms certified ISO 9001.
The non-permanent researcher will integrate the Transfer, Reactivity, Materials for Clean Processes (TRM2P) team. The TRM2P team is working on energy storage (hydrogen vector and recovery of fatal heat), material and energy recovery of bio-sourced products (development of chars for agronomic, environmental and energy applications), on the development of innovative processes for the synthesis of clay-type lamellar compounds (modulation of synthesis conditions according to the intended application), on the formulation of composite materials for separation, controlled release of active molecules and adsorption of pollutants in the gas and liquid phase, and on the development and use of specific characterization methods (calorimetry,..) and modelling of process-adapted mass and heat transfers (knowledge model,..).
The post-doctoral researcher will benefit from a dynamic environment and, in agreement with his/her hierarchical manager, internal technical training at the IS2M, training courses offered by the CNRS and participation in international congresses to present the results of his/her research. The researcher will have to travel frequently to Colmar for the biochar production at the semi-industrial scale.

Large-scale production on a semi-industrial pyrolysis pilot will be carried out in collaboration with CRITT RITTMO, located in Colmar. Regular travelling is therefore expected.

Postdoctoral experience inferior to 2 years

Post-doctoral position (M/F) – pyrolyse de digestats issus de la méthanisation de plantes invasives (MULHOUSE) https://bit.ly/3LKAcU1 #Emploi #OffreEmploi #Recrutement


Biochar – Sawdust for your compost loos for sale – Sussex Timber Co

4 April, 2022
 

Our Biochar is made using sustainably sourced local untreated wood, heated above 300°C with little Oxygen to create a high Carbon soil improver that can be used all year round. The structure of the Biochar functions as a carrier for air, water, nutrients and micro-organisms to benefit soil health.

1 bag £18

Web design, Branding, Copywriting and SEO by Hooked Design and Marketing


Full article: The residual impact of straw mulch and biochar amendments on grain quality …

4 April, 2022
 

Registered in England & Wales No. 3099067
5 Howick Place | London | SW1P 1WG


Carbon Negative Biochar Drawing 'Significant Interest' From Energy Sector | Daily Oil Bulletin

4 April, 2022
 

While biochar is presently well-used in agriculture, horticulture and tree care, a Calgary company thinks it has a growing future in the energy sector as well.

Canada’s most trusted and comprehensive source of oil and gas industry insight and intelligence.

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Projects | Ecology I: The Earth System | Civil and Environmental Engineering | MIT OpenCourseWare

4 April, 2022
 
PROJECT COMPONENTS PERCENTAGES DUE DATES
Term paper 85%   1 Topic submission 0% Lec #3 2 Project description 10% Lec #7 3 Introduction 25% Lec #11 4 Experimental design/proposal 25% Lec #15 5 Complete final paper 40% Lec #22 Project presentation 15% Lec #22-25

Term project instructions (PDF)

Project description instructions (PDF)

All student work is used with permission.

STUDENT EXAMPLE PAPERS FILES
A proposal for limited implementation of a sunshade to evaluate the effects of albedo modification on global biogeochemical cycles (PDF) Testing the unintended consequences of lignin reduction in genetically modified trees on trophic interactions (PDF) Investigation of the effects of stratospheric sulfur injection on terrestrial autotroph productivity via experimentation with diffuse radiation controlled greenhouses (PDF) The unintended consequences of sulfate aerosols in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (PDF) Assessing excess carbon emissions and soil toxicity as unintended consequences in applying biochar as a geoengineering scheme (PDF)

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Biochar fillers in biodegradable, recycled, and fossil-fuel derived plastics – ScienceDirect

4 April, 2022
 

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Activated Carbon / Biochar ! | Howick | Gumtree South Africa

4 April, 2022
 

Reason for Reporting


Amine-Modified Biochar for the Efficient Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide in Flue Gas – MDPI

4 April, 2022
 

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Feature Papers represent the most advanced research with significant potential for high impact in the field. Feature Papers are submitted upon individual invitation or recommendation by the scientific editors and undergo peer review prior to publication.

The Feature Paper can be either an original research article, a substantial novel research study that often involves several techniques or approaches, or a comprehensive review paper with concise and precise updates on the latest progress in the field that systematically reviews the most exciting advances in scientific literature. This type of paper provides an outlook on future directions of research or possible applications.

Editor’s Choice articles are based on recommendations by the scientific editors of MDPI journals from around the world. Editors select a small number of articles recently published in the journal that they believe will be particularly interesting to authors, or important in this field. The aim is to provide a snapshot of some of the most exciting work published in the various research areas of the journal.

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Tian, W.; Wang, Y.; Hao, J.; Guo, T.; Wang, X.; Xiang, X.; Guo, Q. Amine-Modified Biochar for the Efficient Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide in Flue Gas. Atmosphere 2022, 13, 579. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13040579

Tian W, Wang Y, Hao J, Guo T, Wang X, Xiang X, Guo Q. Amine-Modified Biochar for the Efficient Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide in Flue Gas. Atmosphere. 2022; 13(4):579. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13040579

Tian, Wengang, Yanxia Wang, Jian Hao, Tuo Guo, Xia Wang, Xiaoju Xiang, and Qingjie Guo. 2022. “Amine-Modified Biochar for the Efficient Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide in Flue Gas” Atmosphere 13, no. 4: 579. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13040579

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Global insurer partners with Perth carbon startup – Business News

5 April, 2022
 

Local carbon removal startup InterEarth has gained backing from Switzerland-based Zurich Insurance Group and London-based investment group Counteract.

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Biochar facilitated bacterial reduction of Cr(VI) by Shewanella Putrefaciens CN32 – SSRN Papers

5 April, 2022
 

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Harbin Institute of Technology – State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Biochar can facilitate the microbial reduction of various pollutants in soil and groundwater environments, but its impact on Cr(VI) reduction by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) remains to be systematically investigated. In this study, we prepared biochars at 500°C and 700°C from wheat straw and grass, and investigated the impact of these biochars on Cr(VI) reduction by a model DMRB, Shewanella Putrefaciens CN32 (CN32). Pristine biochars abiotically reduced Cr(VI), which decreased the concentration and toxicity of chromium to CN32 cells, and brought about higher overall Cr(VI) removal extent after CN32 were added sequentially; on the other hand, no enhancement effect were observed when biochars and CN32 were added simultaneously. Further tests between biologically reduced biochars and Cr(VI) revealed that the reaction rates between bioreduced biochars and Cr(VI) are relatively sluggish compared to that of direct Cr(VI) reduction by CN32, which prohibited biochars from directly accelerating the Cr(VI) reduction by CN32 in simultaneous-addition scenario. The relative importance of biochars’ surface functional groups and surface areas on their reactivities towards Cr(VI) reduction were also investigated. This study deepened our understanding towards the role of biochar played during bacterial Cr(VI) reduction and could potentially contribute to optimizing the biochar-based Cr(VI) bioremediation strategies.

Keywords: Heavy metals, Redox, Extracellular electron transfer, Pyrogenic carbon, Bioremediation

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Biochar Market Size, Growth And Forecast – Business Merseyside

5 April, 2022
 

New Jersey, United States – This Biochar Market report provides detailed market insights to help companies make better business decisions and drive growth plans based on forecast and market trends. The research focuses on a group search of data from primary and secondary sources. This Biochar market report explores the new developments, trends, and prospects, and forecasts the current status and future prospects of the market from 2022 to 2029. It dives deeply into the industry in terms of current and future situations. The research examines a variety of elements, such as Degrees of advancement, technical breakthroughs, and various strategies employed by the current major players in the market.

Furthermore, the objective of this market report is to provide a related assessment of the major players along with the cost and benefits of the programmed market. It also uses charts to focus on industry standards to help businesses move forward smoothly. This market report makes it easy to determine the impact of COVID-19 on market growth. The main objective of this Biochar market report is to include quantitative data in the form of tables and graphs. Knowledge of market fundamentals is presented in a simple and understandable way for the benefit of readers. This well-planned market analysis provides all readers as well as suppliers, buyers, and stakeholders with a detailed understanding of market conditions and the industry environment.

Get Full PDF Sample Copy of Report: (Including Full TOC, List of Tables & Figures, Chart) @ https://www.verifiedmarketresearch.com/download-sample/?rid=63540

Key Players Mentioned in the Biochar Market Research Report:

Cool Planet, Pacific Biochar Benefit Corporation, Genesis Industries, LLC, CharGrow USA LLC, Black Owl Biochar, Phoenix Energy Group, Airex �nergie Inc., Ambient Energy LLC, Avello Bioenergy, ETIA Group and others.

This Biochar Market report also assesses the organization’s economic landscapes to better understand market dynamics at international and regional levels. This study uses benchmarking to uncover up-to-date information about the target market. The best trading techniques are provided in this report that helps to understand the market better. The latest advancements, growth factors, and competitive analysis are all covered in this Biochar market report. He highlighted some of the most effective marketing strategies to drive economic development and help big players reap significant benefits.

Biochar Market Segmentation:  

Biochar Market, By Feedstock Type

• Woody Biomass
• Agricultural Waste
• Animal Manure
• Others

Biochar Market, By Technology

• Pyrolysis
• Gasification
• Others

Biochar Market, By Application

• Electricity Generation
• Agriculture
• Forestry

The market research analysis further talks about the forces of the industry to shape the market. Important drivers and end-user expectations are also discussed in the Biochar market report to gain solutions. The forecast of related revenue is also made in the report. The primary purpose of the report is to categorize opportunities. It also explains what business models are being used, what the current level of success is, what is the market share and size, and what is the current level of competition in the market. It also sheds light on the functional areas of the company. This Biochar market report also shows how dead stock affects profits and how product losses can be eliminated. With the business tactics provided here, it is possible to experience accelerated growth of your business. It also provides a clear picture of how different business sectors are experiencing the negative impact of COVID-19.

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Biochar Market Report Scope 

Determining the pulse of the market becomes easy through this in-detail Biochar market analysis. Key players can find all competitive data and market size of major regions like North America, Europe, Latin America, Asia-Pacific and Middle East. As part of the competitive analysis, certain strategies are profiled which are pursued by key players such as mergers, collaborations, acquisitions and new product launches. These strategies will greatly help industry players to strengthen their market position and grow their business.

Key questions answered in the report: 

1. Which are the five top players of the Biochar market?

2. How will the Biochar market change in the next five years?

3. Which product and application will take a lion’s share of the Biochar market?

4. What are the drivers and restraints of the Biochar market?

5. Which regional market will show the highest growth?

6. What will be the CAGR and size of the Biochar market throughout the forecast period?

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Dulcimer Instruction Market 2022 – Increasing Demand, Growth Analysis and Future Outlook …

5 April, 2022
 

Dulcimer Instruction Market research is an intelligence report with meticulous efforts undertaken to study the right and valuable information. The data which has been looked upon is done considering both, the existing top players and the upcoming competitors. Business strategies of the key players and the new entering market industries are studied in detail. Well explained SWOT analysis, revenue share and contact information are shared in this report analysis.

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Some of the Top companies Influencing this Market include:

D’Addario, Hal Leonard, Dulcimer Players News, Mel Bay, Homespun, Martin, GHS, Hamilton, Dusty Strings, Apple Creek, Folk Roots, Homespun.

Dulcimer Instruction Market research ensures that you will keep/stay informed ahead of your competitors. The research study examines the Dulcimer Instruction using structured tables and data and provides you with a leading product, submarkets, revenue size, and forecast to 2029. Comparatively is also classifies emerging as well as leaders in the industry.

This report also includes information on company profiles, product descriptions, sales, market share, and contact information for various regional, international, and local vendors in the Global Dulcimer Instruction Market. With the surge in scientific innovation and M&A activity in the business, the market proposal is regularly evolving ahead of the competition. Furthermore, several local and regional manufacturers offer specialized application goods for a wide range of end-users. New merchant applicants are finding it difficult to compete with foreign merchants based on reliability, quality, and technological modernity.

The report provides insights on the following pointers:

Market Penetration: Comprehensive data on the product portfolios of the top players in the Dulcimer Instruction market.

Product Development/Innovation: Detailed information about upcoming technologies, R&D activities, and market product debuts.

Competitive Assessment: An in-depth analysis of the market’s top companies’ market strategies, as well as their geographic and business segments.

Market Development: Information on developing markets in its entirety. This study examines the market in several geographies for various segments.

Market Diversification: Extensive data on new goods, untapped geographies, recent advancements, and investment opportunities in the Dulcimer Instruction market.

Global Dulcimer Instruction Market Segmentation:

Market Segmentation: By Type

Books, DVDS

Market Segmentation: By Application

Performance Instruction, Music Teaching

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The cost analysis of the Global Dulcimer Instruction Market has been performed while keeping in view manufacturing expenses, labor cost, and raw materials and their market concentration rate, suppliers, and price trend. Other factors such as Supply chain, downstream buyers, and sourcing strategy have been assessed to provide a complete and in-depth view of the market. Buyers of the report will also be exposed to a study on market positioning with factors such as target client, brand strategy, and price strategy taken into consideration.

Key questions covered in this report?

Table of Contents

Global Dulcimer Instruction Market Research Report 2022 – 2029

Chapter 1 Dulcimer Instruction Market Overview

Chapter 2 Global Economic Impact on Industry

Chapter 3 Global Market Competition by Manufacturers

Chapter 4 Global Production, Revenue (Value) by Region

Chapter 5 Global Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Regions

Chapter 6 Global Production, Revenue (Value), Price Trend by Type

Chapter 7 Global Market Analysis by Application

Chapter 8 Manufacturing Cost Analysis

Chapter 9 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers

Chapter 10 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders

Chapter 11 Market Effect Factors Analysis

Chapter 12 Global Dulcimer Instruction Market Forecast

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Has the IPCC just given the green light for a renewed focus on carbon removals?

5 April, 2022
 

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The world's largest direct air capture facility, named Orca, opened in Iceland in September | Credits: Climeworks

Yesterday, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published its report into climate change solutions, and its message was clear: a significant ramp up in investment and deployment is needed…

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Industry urges governments to 'quadruple wind power roll out to keep 1.5C alive'

Climeworks captures $650m investment boost as interest in direct air technology builds

Electric vehicles witness historic sales surge in March, as car market slumps to 24-year low

The IPCC's Mitigation of Climate Change report: At a glance

Pioneering direct air capture firm says latest equity round will help it build multi-trillion dollar industry, as IPCC concludes technology is now essential for keeping 1.5C goal within reach

Rapid installation rate seen during 2021 underlines industry's resilience, Global Wind Energy Council argues, as it warns roll out needs to accelerate further to deliver on climate goals

The UK has the energy sources and capability to wean itself of gas fairly quickly. but political ambition is needed, writes REA's chief executive Dr Nina Skorupska


Biochar Market Size, Growth And Forecast | Leading Players – Business Merseyside

5 April, 2022
 

New Jersey, United States – The research study on the Biochar Market offers you detailed and accurate analyzes to strengthen your position in the market. It provides the latest updates and powerful insights into the Biochar industry to help you improve your business tactics and ensure strong revenue growth for years to come. It sheds light on current and future market scenarios and helps you understand the competitive dynamics of the Biochar market. The market segmentation analysis offered in the research study demonstrates how different product segments, applications, and regions are performing in the Biochar market.

The report includes verified and revalidated market figures such as CAGR, gross margin, revenue, price, production growth rate, volume, value, market share, and Y-o-Y growth. We have used the latest primary and secondary research techniques to compile this comprehensive Biochar market report. As part of the regional analysis, we explored key markets such as North America, Europe, India, China, Japan, MEA, and others. Leading companies are profiled based on various factors including markets served, production, revenue, market share, recent developments, and gross margin. There is a dedicated section on market dynamics that thoroughly analyzes the drivers, restraints, opportunities, influencers, challenges, and trends.

Get Full PDF Sample Copy of Report: (Including Full TOC, List of Tables & Figures, Chart) @ https://www.verifiedmarketreports.com/download-sample/?rid=78284

The report provides an excellent overview of the main macroeconomic factors having a significant impact on the growth of the Biochar market. It also provides the absolute dollar opportunity analysis which can be crucial in identifying revenue generation and sales increasing opportunities in the Biochar market. Market players can use the qualitative and quantitative analysis provided in the report to get a good understanding of the Biochar market and make strong strides in the industry in terms of growth. The overall Biochar market size and that of each segment studied in the report are accurately calculated based on various factors.

Key Players Mentioned in the Biochar Market Research Report:

Cool Planet, Biochar Supreme, NextChar, Terra Char, Genesis Industries, Interra Energy, CharGrow, Pacific Biochar, Biochar Now, The Biochar Company (TBC), ElementC6, Vega Biofuels 

Biochar Market Segmentation:  

By the product type, the market is primarily split into:

• Wood Source Biochar
• Corn Stove Source Biochar
• Rice Stove Source Biochar
• Wheat Stove Source Biochar
• Other Stove Source Biochar

By the application, this report covers the following segments:

• Soil Conditioner
• Fertilizer
• Others

In this report, researchers focused on social media sentiment analysis and consumer sentiment analysis. For the social media sentiment analysis, they focused on trending topics, mentions on social media platforms including the percentage of mentions, trending brands, and consumer perception of products on social media platforms including negative and positive mentions. As part of the consumer sentiment analysis, they examined the impact of certifications, claims, and labels, factors influencing consumer preferences, key trends, consumer preferences including the futuristic approach and historical scenarios, influential social and economic factors, specification development, and consumers. buying habits.

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Biochar Market Report Scope

Geographic Segment Covered in the Report:

The Biochar report provides information about the market area, which is further subdivided into sub-regions and countries/regions. In addition to the market share in each country and sub-region, this chapter of this report also contains information on profit opportunities. This chapter of the report mentions the market share and growth rate of each region, country, and sub-region during the estimated period.  

 • North America (USA and Canada)
 • Europe (UK, Germany, France and the rest of Europe)
 • Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, and the rest of the Asia Pacific region)
 • Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, and the rest of Latin America)
 • Middle East and Africa (GCC and rest of the Middle East and Africa) 

Key questions answered in the report: 

1. Which are the five top players in the Biochar market?

2. How will the Biochar market change in the next five years?

3. Which product and application will take a lion’s share of the Biochar market?

4. What are the drivers and restraints of the Biochar market?

5. Which regional market will show the highest growth?

6. What will be the CAGR and size of the Biochar market throughout the forecast period?

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Biochar Market Latest Innovations, Demand and Future Projections with top Major Key …

5 April, 2022
 

Glob Market Reports offers an overarching research and analysis-based study on, “Global Biochar Market Report, History and Forecast 2016-2028, Breakdown Data by Companies, Key Regions, Types and Application“. This report offers an insightful take on the drivers and restraints present in the market. Biochar data reports also provide a 5 year pre-historic and forecast for the sector and include data on socio-economic data of global. Key stakeholders can consider statistics, tables & figures mentioned in this report for strategic planning which lead to success of the organization. It sheds light on strategic production, revenue, and consumption trends for players to improve sales and growth in the global Biochar Market.

Download Free PDF Sample Copy of the Report(with covid 19 Impact Analysis): https://www.globmarketreports.com/request-sample/183540

Here, it focuses on the recent developments, sales, market value, production, gross margin, and other significant factors of the business of the major players operating in the global Biochar Market. Players can use the accurate market facts and figures and statistical studies provided in the report to understand the current and future growth of the global Biochar market.

Our Research Analyst implemented a Free PDF Sample Report copy as per your Research Requirement, also including impact analysis of COVID-19 on Biochar Market Size

Biochar market competitive landscape offers data information and details by companies. Its provides a complete analysis and precise statistics on revenue by the major players participants for the period 2022-2028. The report also illustrates minute details in the Biochar market governing micro and macroeconomic factors that seem to have a dominant and long-term impact, directing the course of popular trends in the global Biochar market.

Market split by Type, can be divided into: Wood Sourced Corn Stove Sourced Rice Stove Sourced Wheat Stove Sourced OthersMarket split by Application, can be divided into: Soil Conditioner Fertilizers Livestock Feed Others

Regions Covered in the Global Biochar Market:1. South America Biochar Market Covers Colombia, Brazil, and Argentina.2. North America Biochar Market Covers Canada, United States, and Mexico.3. Europe Biochar Market Covers UK, France, Italy, Germany, and Russia.4. The Middle East and Africa Biochar Market Covers UAE, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Nigeria, and South Africa.5. Asia Pacific Biochar Market Covers Korea, Japan, China, Southeast Asia, and India.Years Considered to Estimate the Market Size:History Year: 2015-2022Base Year: 2022Estimated Year: 2022Forecast Year: 2022-2028

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Key highlights of the Biochar Market report:• Growth rate• Renumeration prediction• Consumption graph• Market concentration ratio• Secondary industry competitors• Competitive structure• Major restraints• Market drivers• Regional bifurcation• Competitive hierarchy• Current market tendencies• Market concentration analysisCustomization of the Report: Glob Market Reports provides customization of reports as per your need. This report can be personalized to meet your requirements. Get in touch with our sales team, who will guarantee you to get a report that suits your necessities.

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Global Electric Scrubber Dryer Market 2022 Industry Research, Segmentation, Key Players …

5 April, 2022
 

The Global Electric Scrubber Dryer Market from 2022 to 2028 scientific report, published by MarketsandResearch.biz, is jam-packed with industry developments, intellectual and functional solutions, and cutting-edge technology to improve the user experience.  The global Electric Scrubber Dryer market report discusses driving factors, chances, and limitations to gain actionable insight.

The study includes significant players such as manufacturers, traders, industry groups, and downstream vendors. The material serves as the foundation for users seeking to enter the global Electric Scrubber Dryer market To identify the factors driving growth, restrictions, possibilities, improvements, and market pressures. This report can help business strategists achieve an efficient increase in international and players in the region. It provides a detailed and factual analysis of current trends, market dynamics, and segmentation analysis.

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Effect of Co-Application of Biochar and Humic Acid on Heavy Metal Contaminated … – SSRN Papers

5 April, 2022
 

Lanzhou University

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Lanzhou University

Lanzhou University

Lanzhou University

Lanzhou University

Lanzhou University

Highlights1.The co-application of BC and HA can reduce Cd effectiveness and increase soil nutrients in an arid area of Northwest China.2 The co-application of BC and HA reduced the accumulation of Cd in the crop, reducing Cd stress on the crop and increasing crop yield.3. The co-application of BC and HA improves the quality of agricultural soils.4. The application of BC and HA can provide ideas for achieving the carbon peaking and carbon neutrality goals in Northwest China.

Keywords: Biochar, Humic acid, Cadmium, soil quality

Suggested Citation

222 Tianshui South Road
Chengguan
Lanzhou, 730000
China

No Address Available

222 Tianshui South Road
Chengguan
Lanzhou, 730000
China

222 Tianshui South Road
Chengguan
Lanzhou, 730000
China

222 Tianshui South Road
Chengguan
Lanzhou, 730000
China

222 Tianshui South Road
Chengguan
Lanzhou, 730000
China

222 Tianshui South Road
Chengguan
Lanzhou, 730000
China

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Noxious weed prickly acacia to be turned into 'green coal' by renewable energy company in …

5 April, 2022
 

One of the foremost harmful weeds in Australia will soon be utilized to create a “green” elective to coal. Prickly acacia, initially from Africa, has been a multi-million-dollar issue over outback Queensland for decades, swarming prime touching arrive, murdering local prairies, and debasing soil wellbeing.

But after a decade of investigation, one company has found how to turn the little, prickly bush into a carbon impartial vitality source that will be utilized in cogeneration control plants. Green Day Vitality will construct a $30 million plant within the northwest Queensland town of Richmond, where thorny acacia has been out of control since the 1990s.

The thorny acacia will be gathered, made into wood chips, and at that point broiled to get to be a fuel source like warm coal. Biochar is another fabric made from thorny acacia that can be utilized to form green hydrogen.

It can moreover be included to the soil to make strides in its well-being and quality and can offer for up to $2,000 a ton – whereas coal offers for around $400 a ton. Green Day Vitality author Brad Carswell said the $30 million venture was a game-changer when it came to handling the intrusive weed.

“I think it’s been looked at [sometime recently] but not within the way we’ve been looking at it,” Mr. Carswell said. “We’ve continuously said you wish a financial arrangement to thorny acacia, [or] its never reaching to be touched. “We have a tall gifted group and have been coming to Richmond for the past 10 years.”

Richmond Shire Board Chairman John Wharton said the locale had been attempting to gather thorny acacia for as long as he might keep in mind. “When I was a youthful fella we utilized to harm them, but we’ve come a long way since at that point,” Mr. Wharton said.

“We’ve gone through a parcel of money and time attempting to control thorny acacia and we have to make it a reasonable item for an industry.

© 2021 The ABJ -The Australian Business Journal. All Rights Reserved.


Making Biochar on the Small Scale | TryBooking Australia

5 April, 2022
 


Biochar production and job promotion for civilian corps integration — The Webinar Portal

5 April, 2022
 

 

Apr 28, 2022 11:00 am US/Eastern

Length: 01:00   (hh:mm)

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Our webinar Speaker this month is Kelpie Wilson. Kelpie is an engineer and analyst with 35 years of experience in renewable energy, sustainable forestry and resource conservation. Since 2008, she has focused on biochar. She has consulted with private industry and government agencies through her company Wilson Biochar. Her contracts have included work for the International Biochar Initiative, Washington Department of Ecology, North Dakota Forest Service, Great Plains Biochar Initiative, Oregon Biochar Solutions, Long Tom Restoration Council, California Almond Board, and many others. She is also a founding board member of the US Biochar Initiative. Kelpie works directly with forest managers, the wood products industry, and farmers to develop systems for making biochar from waste biomass.

For information about the U.S. Biochar Initiative, click here.

 

Additional Resources:

United States Biochar Initiative
US Forest Service (biochar related)
More Biochar related Webinars
The Forest Products Network
Southern Forests (biochar related)
Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetic Resources
UT Institute of Agriculture – Biochar
University of Georgia – Biochar

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'This Magical Moment': A Community Works Together to Prepare for Wildfire – Redheaded Blackbelt

5 April, 2022
 

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5 April, 2022
 

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[Operative4/1/2022]Biochar, Cal. Code Regs. tit. 3 § 2306 | Casetext Search + Citator

5 April, 2022
 


A comparison between the characteristics of a biochar-NPK granule and a commercial NPK …

5 April, 2022
 

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A study on the thermochemical co-conversion of poultry litter and elephant grass to biochar

5 April, 2022
 

Elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) and poultry litter are waste materials readily available all year round in West Africa that can be harnessed for the production of biochar via simultaneous thermochemical processing. In this study, the quality of biochar produced via the low-temperature thermochemical conversion of poultry litter and elephant grass at averaged temperature of 300 °C was evaluated in a retort heated, non-electrically powered, top-lit updraft reactor. The product was characterised using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses. From the FTIR, it was observed that the co-conversion of poultry litter with elephant grass do not significantly increase the functional groups present in the biochar in comparison with those from the single feedstock. The specific surface areas of the biochar from poultry litter, elephant grass and combined feedstock were 307.0, 475.1 and 398.6 m2/g, respectively. The char obtained are mesoporous and possess large pore size which reinforces its potential for multiple environmental and agricultural applications. The findings of the study are advantageous in efforts for solid waste management and environmental pollution control.

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Enquiries about data availability should be directed to the authors.

The authors have not disclosed any funding.

Correspondence to Adewale George Adeniyi.

The authors declare that there are no conflicts of interest.

This article does not contain any studies involving human or animal subjects.

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Received: 16 November 2021

Accepted: 14 March 2022

Published: 04 April 2022

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10098-022-02311-3

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Co-application of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal and Biochar in Pb-polluted Soil … – Genialreviews

6 April, 2022
 

Muhammad Iqbal

Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Government College University, Faisalabad, 38000, Pakistan

Email: iqbal.farhad528@gmail.com

The co-existence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and biochar in Pb-polluted soil can reduce Pb distribution in barley and mitigate associated Pb toxicity to humans. A soil polluted from Pb-acid batteries effluents (SPB) was amended with AMF inoculum (four AMF species), lignin (LG), lignin biochar (LGB), and combinations of AMF inoculum with LG and LGB to obtain five treatments, i.e., control, AMF, LG, LGB, LG+AMF, and LGB+AMF. Barley was grown on SPB amended with these treatments. After harvest, the grain parameters studied were grain Pb concentrations, nutrition, and yield.

Moreover, AMF parameters related to soil Pb-bioavailability, i.e., AMF root colonization, total and extractable glomalin (TG and Ex-G, respectively), soil bioavailable Pb (Pbbio), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were measured. The safety of grains for human consumption was assessed through the human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK 293) cytotoxicity assay.

Results revealed that LGB+AMF improved grain yield (54%), grain P (36%), K (33%), Mg (41%), Fe (71%), Zn (45%), and Mn (29%) contents, compared to control. Additionally, augmentation in AMF root colonization (218%), TG (197%), Ex-G (81%), and MBC (57%), while reduced Pbbio (57%) were found. The HEK-293 assay also showed that grain produced on LGB+AMF did not result in cell apoptosis, distortion, and cohesion loss.

Our findings endorse that AMF root colonization, TG, Ex-G, and MBC reduced Pbbio to plants via Pb adsorption on AMF mycelium and Pb binding with TG and Ex-G in LGB+AMF treatment. Conclusively, LGB+AMF treatment can remediate Pb˗polluted soils and produce safer grain.

 Keywords: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Pb˗polluted soils, Barley, Glomalin, HEK-293 assay

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What are the example methodology for Biochar aside from furnacing avocado seed? – Bartleby.com

6 April, 2022
 


Biochar-Climate Chaos Solution, Lily Springs Farm, Osceola, 30 April – AllEvents.in

6 April, 2022
 

Tony C. Saladino, one of the founders of ECO-Tours of Wisconsin Inc. and our guide on this ECO-Tour would first like to credit the photograph above, it is a scanning electron micrograph of char made from corn stalk by Johannes and Lehmann at Cornell.

Nearly fifteen years ago, Tony stumbled onto old research about terra preta, biochar or “black earths” of the Amazon. He continues to study, learn and share his knowledge with people about using biochar to grow more vegetables in less space, keeping healthy critters and dialing down atmospheric carbon. Research shows that biochar has too many benefits to list here but among them are increasing habitat for the soil microbiome, the basis of soil health; protection of vital water resources, both surface and groundwater, the elimination of methane emissions from soil and stabilizing soil moisture and temperature.

“From the beginning, I knew that this information had to be shared.” Tony said recently and to that end he continues to teach this ancient blend of art and science. Come learn, spend a day in nature and find out why he remains so inspired by something as seemingly mundane as charcoal. Once made, biochar changes the nature of soil in so many positive ways that he won’t plant a seed in soil that does not have biochar in it. Come, learn why, find out how simple the six steps to success are and you will go away ready to sequester carbon forever while reaping the rewards of healthier soil!

Our presentation provides overview, demonstration and practice making and inoculating biochar. We will also take a deep dive into sepecific tools and techniques and scaling them to your particualr situation. This soil amendment creates thriving and diverse microbial communities for healthy soil. We will teach and practice how to make and process biochar with materials and inputs you have on-site or in your area.

Build a healthy, diverse microbiome in the soil! Learn about the process of adding minerals, nutrients, and microbes to char (made from pine slash available at this site) in order to create biochar. We will learn about the soil food web and what part each species plays in the production of rich, healthy soil. Soil health is crucial for all forms of life, providing healthy plants, nutrient dense foods, and mitigating climate change by sequestering carbon in soil.

Our day will begin about ten in the morning with brief introductions between and among participants, and a basic overview of the vision, mission, goals and current situation at Lily Springs Farm and the vision, mission, goals and current situation at ECO-Tours of Wisconsin Inc.

11A-1P We will cover the first steps required to Make excellent quality charcoal, which begins the process and Moisturizing, Micronizing and Mineralizing the char which is the beginning of the miraculous transformation into biochar. We will be learning to complete in a matter of weeks, what Mother Nature requires decades or even centuries to achieve, building healthy soil.

From 1-1:30 We urge people to eat a little something. Due to continuing Covid-19 protocols, please maintain social distance. Try not to congregate around shared food options. Please bring something that will nourish and satisfy your hunger for the next few hours because we will cover adding Microbes and Maturation of the char and the need for healthy microbial communities and sources of nourishment for them, after our brief meal break. We are no good to others until we first take care of our selves!

1:30-3P Discussion will focus on likely sources rich in soil life and how to go about importing healthy soil microbes into the prepared char. Each step of the way we will be concentrating on the variety of ways to tackle each step in the process. Our focus throughout is on layering functions and using techniques that provide multiple ecological services, to efficiently transform the char. We pay special attention to what each of us can find locally and help students brainstorm about what they may have available already that can be used to make and process their own biochar. We also cover where not to find microbes for our developing biochar.

3P-4P We will delve into specific circumstances, questions, where each of us can source feedstock, dry woody material, how to refine each of the six steps required and consultation about any aspect of the process. After wrapping up, each student is encouraged to contact Tony if they run into any challenges along the way or need additional assistance in making biochar work for your specific situation. Whether you are just enriching soil for a few houseplants or you manage thousands of acres, our inspiration is your successful utilization of this ancient gift our human ancestors have left behind for us. ECO-Tours of Wisconsin is committed to healing the rift between humankind and nature and our goal is to help you succeed.

Tickets are $50 per person, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds. Please pay the full price if you are able (in order to help the organizers cover costs). Contact Tony (YmlvY2hhcm1hc3RlciB8IGdtYWlsICEgY29t) for details on scholarships or reduced-priced entry, include a brief description of how you intend to use the knowledge gained from this class.


Global Biochar Fuel Market 2022 Supply Chain Analysis, Structure, Industry Inspection, and …

6 April, 2022
 

The Global Biochar Fuel Market from 2022 to 2028 is examined in a new MarketandResearch.biz research study. The report covers previous year’s growth trends, market share, industry analysis, growth drivers, limitations, opportunities, and challenges, as well as key market player profiling.

Our firm provides in-depth market trends analysis as well as revenue projections. Growth patterns are established by economic factors that impact the development of a product in a certain location. The research necessitates a thorough investigation of the world’s fastest-growing industries Biochar Fuel market, including product offerings, business overviews, regional presence, business strategies, mergers and acquisitions, SWOT analysis, current developments, and critical financial data.

DOWNLOAD FREE SAMPLE REPORT: https://marketandresearch.biz/sample-request/118336

Market position, profit margins, future advancements, economic variables, opportunities, difficulties, dangers, and entry barriers are all factors in the Biochar Fuel business. When analysing the manufacturing process, the distribution of production plants, capacities, raw material supply, R&D status, technology source, and commercial output are all taken into account. This section provides an overview of the Biochar Fuel industry in general.

This course lays the groundwork for market segmentation.

The market’s most important players.

The Biochar Fuelmarket is a classification system for commodities based on their attributes.

The study looks at major locations all across the world, including

ACCESS FULL REPORT: https://marketandresearch.biz/report/118336/world-biochar-fuel-market-research-report-2022-covering-usa-europe-china-japan-india-south-east-asia-and-etc

The industry has benefited from the Biochar Fuel market, as has the world economy. The research examines the current condition of the industry and makes recommendations for those who wish to grow and benefit from it. The assessment of industrial capabilities, as well as demand and supply characteristics, can be aided by mapping import-export data by country.

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Botanical Supplements Market Analysis, Leading Players, Future Growth, Business … – FMIBlog

6 April, 2022
 

The botanical supplements market is valued at US$ 55.6 Bn in 2022 and is projected to grow at a CAGR of 7.7% during the forecast period, to reach a value of US$ 116.7 Bn by 2032. Newly released data from Future Market Insights market analysis shows that global botanical supplements demand is projected to grow year-on-year (Y-o-Y) growth of 7.3% in 2022.

The team of researchers at Future Market Insights are focussing on research and market study to produce different Botanical Supplements Market forecasts and predictions at both national and international levels. They have considered several leads of information pertaining to the industry like market figures and merger estimations to assess and produce reliable and informative insights on the Botanical Supplements Market.

Get Sample Copy Of Botanical Supplements Market@  https://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/sample/rep-gb-14424

Apart from providing authentic taste to products, botanical supplements also come with perceived health benefits. For instance, green tea extract can well maintain cardiovascular health and Echinacea plant can boost immune system. According to research, 97% of European consumers can perceive the term of botanical or herbal supplements well, while 82% trust on such products to maintain a natural and strong health.

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Biochar Market Worth US$ 368.85 Mn, Globally, by 2028 at 11.1% CAGR – Daily Advent

6 April, 2022
 

NEW YORK, April 6, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Insight Partners published latest research study on Biochar Market to Forecast 2028 – COVID-19 Impact and Global Analysis – by Feedstock, Application, and Geography,” the biochar market is projected to reach US$ 368.85 million by 2028 from US$ 177.06 million in 2021. It…

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Biochar Addition to Stored Slurry Reduces Carbon Dioxide, Nitrous Oxide, and … – SSRN Papers

6 April, 2022
 

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Coventry University

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Biochar is known for its adsorptive capacity. International aspirations for global Net Zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have raised the profile of carbon emissions from meat production with agriculture a major source of environmental pollutants including toxic substances. Stored domestic livestock slurry emits GHGs as well as ammonia whose atmospheric deposition threatens soils and wild plant diversity while hydrogen sulphide emissions are highly toxic. We tested the efficacy of biochar addition to stored slurry in adsorbing gases and, thus, its potential in mitigating global climate change, biodiversity loss and potential human health impacts. A laboratory experiment added low (1L), medium (2L) and high (3L) concentrations of biochar to slurry (15L) stored for four weeks with gas fluxes measured and compared to controls with no biochar added. Biochar significantly reduced carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions by up to 67% and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions by up to 71% but had no overall impact on total GHG emissions due to having no effect on methane (CH 4 ) which represented 98% of total GHGs. There was no treatment effect on ammonia (NH 3 ). Hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) was a rare product but when it occurred its concentration exceeded the safe occupational exposure limit of <10ppm. Hydrogen sulphide was more likely to occur in controls and at higher concentration (average 170 ppm, max. 370 ppm), less likely to occur in the low biochar treatment and at lower concentration (average 48 ppm, max. 120 ppm) and was not emitted at all by medium or high biochar treatments. Biochar addition to stored slurry reduced carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and hydrogen sulphide, but not ammonia, methane or total greenhouse gas emissions suggesting limited application in climate change mitigation or ammonia reduction but some potential in preventing toxic gas related farm accidents.

Keywords: Adsorption, climate change, mitigation, sustainability, toxic

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Nutrients enriched biochar production through Co-Pyrolysis of poultry litter with banana …

6 April, 2022
 

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What are the Properties of Goldenrod Plant Biochar? – AZoM

6 April, 2022
 

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In an article recently published in the open-access journal Materials, researchers reported the physicochemical characteristics of biochar made from goldenrod plants.

Study: Physicochemical Properties of Biochar Produced from Goldenrod Plants. Image Credit: Greens and Blues/Shutterstock.com

Biomass has recently emerged as a viable alternative to solid fossil fuels in the hunt for energy sources that have a lower environmental impact. Biomass has a lot of technological and development potential, and it's one of the most important renewable energy sources.

However, due to its wetness, flash point, and bulk density, biomass's physicochemical qualities make it difficult to burn. Biomass can be thermally treated to increase its energy, and improve its chemical and physicomechanical properties. Thermolysis is defined as the chemical degradation of material produced by an increase in temperature. Torrefaction is one of the techniques of thermolysis.

Average ash content in biomass and biochar. All data are expressed as mean ± SD. Bars with a different letter indicate significant differences according to Fisher’s LSD test (p < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant). Homogeneous groups are marked with the same letters (lowercase letters a, b, c for biomass homogeneous groups, uppercase letters A, B, C, D, E for biochar homogeneous groups). Image Credit: Łapczy ´nska-Kordon, B. et al., Materials

Biochar, an environmentally-friendly, porous carbon substance made by pyrolysis from raw biomass, has recently been proposed as a foundation for powdered photocatalytic platforms. The properties of biochar produced through the torrefaction process can vary significantly depending on the origin and type of the biomass, its duration, the temperature of the process, and the initial moisture content.

The torrefaction technique was used to treat a variety of plant and waste biomass from agro-food processing and municipal garbage. The Asteraceae plant family, which includes goldenrod, could be a possible raw material for biochar manufacturing.

In this study, the authors discussed the utility of goldenrod (Solidago canadensis and Solidago gigantea) to make biochar. The plant's vegetative and generative components, as well as the entire plant, were torrefied at temperatures of 250 °C and 275 °C for 3 hours. The raw material's and biochar's physicochemical parameters, such as ash content, bulk density, moisture content, calorific value, volatile matter content, and heat of combustion, were determined. Raw biomass and biochar bulk densities were also quantified.

The researchers evaluated the physicochemical features of biochar made from the whole plant, as well as the generative and vegetative sections of two goldenrod species. The ability to evaluate the viability of employing goldenrod in the creation of biochar was demonstrated.

The team split plants into vegetative and generative sections, and laboratory tests were performed on each of the specified parts as well as the entire plants before and after the torrefaction process. The indirect drying method was used to determine the material moisture content. The ash content of the tested material was determined using a muffle furnace in compliance with the EN ISO 18122:2016-01 standard. EN ISO 18123:2016-0 was used to determine the volatile matter content. Using the KL-12 calorimeter, the bomb calorimeter determined the heat of combustion and calorific value.

The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to see if the studied factors had an effect on the observed variables. The statistical investigation of thermochemical processes with biochar generated from plants in the Asteraceae family, which included goldenrod, was also done using ANOVA.

Average volatile matter content in biomass and biochar. All data are expressed as mean ± SD. Bars with a different letter indicate significant differences according to Fisher’s LSD test (p < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant). Homogeneous groups are marked with the same letters (lowercase letters a, b, c for biomass homogeneous groups, uppercase letters A, B, C, D, E, F, G for biochar homogeneous groups). Image Credit: Łapczy ´nska-Kordon, B. et al., Materials

The biomass of Giant goldenrod and Canadian goldenrod had a bulk density of 331 to 487 kg.m-3. The bulk density of the produced biochar ranged between 149 and 324 kg.m-3.  The moisture level of the analyzed biomass ranged from 9.18% to 12.86%. The moisture level of Giant goldenrod—whole plant ranged from 9.18% to 10.73%. At 250 °C, the moisture content of biochar ranged from 5.28% to 8.96%. The biochar derived from the Giant goldenrod—whole plant had the lowest moisture content, whereas the Giant goldenrod—generative section had the greatest.

The average volatile matter concentration of the analyzed biomass ranged from 65 to 80%. The content of the Giant and Canadian goldenrod vegetative sections, as well as the generative part of the Giant goldenrod, ranged from 77 to 78%. Biomass had a calorific value ranging from 17 to 21 MJ.kg-1. The calorific value of the Giant goldenrod—whole plant was around 18 MJ.kg-1, and it ranged between 18–19 MJ.kg-1 in the vegetative parts of both species and the generative component of the Giant goldenrod.

The ash content of biochar produced at 250°C and 275°C showed no significant variations. The volatile matter concentration of biochar produced at 275

°C ranged from 40% to 54%. At a temperature of 275 °C, the average calorific value of torrefaction ranged from 15.47 to 22.68 MJ.kg-1. The complete plant of the Giant goldenrod had the lowest value of 15.47 MJ.kg-1, whereas the generative section of the Canadian goldenrod had the greatest value of 22.68 MJ.kg-1.

Combustion heat of biomass and biochar. All data are expressed as mean ± SD. Bars with a different letter indicate significant differences according to Fisher’s LSD test (p < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant). Homogeneous groups are marked with the same letters (lowercase letters a, b, c for biomass homogeneous groups, uppercase letters A, B, C for biochar homogeneous groups). Image Credit: Łapczy ´nska-Kordon, B. et al., Materials

In conclusion, this study elucidated that the entire plant of both goldenrod species had a substantial impact on the ash and volatile matter content of biochar and fresh biomass. The ash content, calorific value, and heat of combustion increased following biomass torrefaction, while volatile matter content declined. The plant species and sampled portions had a substantial impact on the ash content, calorific value, volatile matter content, and heat of combustion in both raw biomass and biochar.

The authors also observed that the calorific value of biomass and biochar, as well as the heat of combustion, are significantly dependent on the sample type (generative part, vegetative part, whole plant). They also determined that the heat of combustion and calorific value of biochar produced at a greater temperature are both higher.

Łapczy ´nska-Kordon, B., Slipek, Z., Słomka-Polonis, K., et al. Physicochemical Properties of Biochar Produced from Goldenrod Plants. Materials 15(7) 2615 (2022). https://www.mdpi.com/1996-1944/15/7/2615

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Diacarbon Energy, ElementC6, Carbon Gold, Agri-Tech Producers, Swiss Biochar GmbH, etc.

6 April, 2022
 

The research team projects that the Granular Biochar Market size will grow from XXX in 2022 to XXX by 2028, at an estimated CAGR of XX. The base year considered for the study is 2021, and the market size is projected from 2022 to 2028.

The prime objective of this report is to help the user understand the market in terms of its definition, segmentation, market potential, influential trends, and the challenges that the market is facing with 10 major regions and 50 major countries. Deep researches and analysis were done during the preparation of the report. The readers will find this report very helpful in understanding the market in depth. The data and the information regarding the market are taken from reliable sources such as websites, annual reports of the companies, journals, and others and were checked and validated by the industry experts. The facts and data are represented in the report using diagrams, graphs, pie charts, and other pictorial representations. This enhances the visual representation and also helps in understanding the facts much better.

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By Market Players:

Diacarbon Energy

ElementC6

Carbon Gold

Agri-Tech Producers

Swiss Biochar GmbH

Biochar Now

BlackCarbon

The Biochar Company

Kina

BioChar Products

Cool Planet

Carbon Terra

By Type

Wood Source Biochar

Corn Source Biochar

Wheat Source Biochar

Others

 

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Soil Conditioner

Fertilizer

Others

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North America

United States

Canada

Mexico

East Asia

China

Japan

South Korea

Europe

Germany

United Kingdom

France

Italy

Russia

Spain

Netherlands

Switzerland

Poland

South Asia

India

Pakistan

Bangladesh

Southeast Asia

Indonesia

Thailand

Singapore

Malaysia

Philippines

Vietnam

Myanmar

Middle East

Turkey

Saudi Arabia

Iran

United Arab Emirates

Israel

Iraq

Qatar

Kuwait

Oman

Africa

Nigeria

South Africa

Egypt

Algeria

Morocoo

Oceania

Australia

New Zealand

South America

Brazil

Argentina

Colombia

Chile

Venezuela

Peru

Puerto Rico

Ecuador

Rest of the World

Kazakhstan

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Besides the standard structure reports, we also provide custom research according to specific requirements.

The report focuses on Global, Top 10 Regions and Top 50 Countries Market Size of Granular Biochar 2018-2022, and development forecast 2022-2028 including industries, major players/suppliers worldwide and market share by regions, with company and product introduction, position in the market including their market status and development trend by types and applications which will provide its price and profit status, and marketing status & market growth drivers and challenges, with base year as 2021. 

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Key Indicators Analysed

Market Players & Competitor Analysis: The report covers the key players of the industry including Company Profile, Product Specifications, Production Capacity/Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin 2018-2022 & Sales by Product Types.

Global and Regional Market Analysis: The report includes Global & Regional market status and outlook 2022-2028. Further the report provides break down details about each region & countries covered in the report. Identifying its production, consumption, import & export, sales volume & revenue forecast.

Market Analysis by Product Type: The report covers majority Product Types in the Granular Biochar Industry, including its product specifcations by each key player, volume, sales by Volume and Value (M USD).

Markat Analysis by Application Type: Based on the Granular Biochar Industry and its applications, the market is further sub-segmented into several major Application of its industry. It provides you with the market size, CAGR & forecast by each industry applications.

Market Trends: Market key trends which include Increased Competition and Continuous Innovations.

Opportunities and Drivers: Identifying the Growing Demands and New Technology

Porters Five Force Analysis: The report will provide with the state of competition in industry depending on five basic forces: threat of new entrants, bargaining power of suppliers, bargaining power of buyers, threat of substitute products or services, and existing industry rivalry. 

Key Answers Questions such as:

1. What is the market size and forecast of the Granular Biochar Market?
2. What are the inhibiting factors and impact of COVID-19 shaping the Granular Biochar Market during the forecast period?
3. Which are the products/segments/applications/areas to invest in over the forecast period in the Granular Biochar Market?
4. What is the competitive strategic window for opportunities in the Granular Biochar Market?
5. What are the technology trends and regulatory frameworks in the Granular Biochar Market?
6. What is the market share of the leading vendors in the Granular Biochar Market?
7.What modes and strategic moves are considered suitable for entering the Granular Biochar Market?

COVID-19 Impact

Report covers Impact of Coronavirus COVID-19: Since the COVID-19 virus outbreak in December 2019, the disease has spread to almost every country around the globe with the World Health Organization declaring it a public health emergency. The global impacts of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are already starting to be felt, and will significantly affect the Granular Biochar Market in 2021. The outbreak of COVID-19 has brought effects on many aspects, like flight cancellations; travel bans and quarantines; restaurants closed; all indoor/outdoor events restricted; over forty countries state of emergency declared; massive slowing of the supply chain; stock market volatility; falling business confidence, growing panic among the population, and uncertainty about future.

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Fine Biochar Powder Market Size, Growth Drivers And Forecast | Leading Players

6 April, 2022
 

New Jersey, United States – This Lithium Foil Market report provides a comprehensive overview of important aspects that will drive market growth such as Market drivers, restraints, prospects, opportunities, restraints, current trends, and technical and industrial advancements. The detailed industry study, industry sector development and improvement, and new product launches presented in this Lithium Foil market report are of tremendous help to the significant new commercial entrants entering the market. This Lithium Foil market report carries out an attentive market assessment and offers an expert analysis of the market considering the market development the current market situation and future projections. This Lithium Foil market report study further highlights the market driving factors, market overview, industry volume, and market share. Since this Lithium Foil market report offers an effective market strategy, key players can reap huge profits by making the right investments in the market. As this Lithium Foil Market report depicts the ever-changing needs of consumers, sellers, and buyers across different regions, it becomes easy to target specific products and attain significant revenue in the global market. 

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The report includes company profiles of almost all the major players operating in the Lithium Foil market. The Company Profiles section provides valuable analysis of key market players’ strengths and weaknesses, business developments, recent advances, mergers and acquisitions, expansion plans, global footprint, market presence, and product portfolios. This information can be used by players and other market participants to maximize their profitability and streamline their business strategies. Our competitive analysis also includes key insights to help new entrants identify barriers to entry and assess the level of competitiveness in the Lithium Foil market.

Key Players Mentioned in the Lithium Foil Market Research Report:

Ganfeng Lithium, Albemarle, Chemetall (BASF), CNNC Jianzhong, American Elements, Tianqi Lithium, CEL, NCCP, FMC Corporation 

Lithium Foil Market Segmentation:  

By the product type, the market is primarily split into:

• 2N
• 3N
• 4N
• 5N

By the application, this report covers the following segments:

• Lithium Battery
• Pharmaceutical and Intermediate
• Others

The study included in this report will help organizations in understanding the top threats and opportunities faced by retailers in the global market. In addition, the study provides an overview of the competitive landscape as well as a SWOT analysis. This report provides detailed information about product or technological developments in the Lithium Foil market and an overview of the impact of these developments on the potential growth of the market.

In order to maintain their supremacy in the Lithium Foil industry, the majority of companies are currently implementing new technologies, strategies, product innovations, expansions, and long-term contracts. After reviewing key companies, the report focuses on startups driving business growth. The report’s authors identify possible mergers and acquisitions between the startups and key organizations in the study. Big players are working hard to adopt the latest technologies to gain a strategic advantage over the competition as new technologies are introduced regularly.

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Lithium Foil Market Report Scope

Geographic Segment Covered in the Report:

The Lithium Foil report provides information about the market area, which is further subdivided into sub-regions and countries/regions. In addition to the market share in each country and sub-region, this chapter of this report also contains information on profit opportunities. This chapter of the report mentions the market share and growth rate of each region, country, and sub-region during the estimated period.  

 • North America (USA and Canada)
 • Europe (UK, Germany, France and the rest of Europe)
 • Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India, and the rest of the Asia Pacific region)
 • Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, and the rest of Latin America)
 • Middle East and Africa (GCC and rest of the Middle East and Africa) 

Key questions answered in the report: 

1. Which are the five top players in the Lithium Foil market?

2. How will the Lithium Foil market change in the next five years?

3. Which product and application will take a lion’s share of the Lithium Foil market?

4. What are the drivers and restraints of the Lithium Foil market?

5. Which regional market will show the highest growth?

6. What will be the CAGR and size of the Lithium Foil market throughout the forecast period?

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Biochar stability and impact on soil organic carbon mineralization depend on … – ScienceDirect.com

6 April, 2022